Here’s why learning another language should be compulsory in every school


“Now, after spending most of my adult life in higher education, researching languages, cultures and cognition, I have become more convinced than ever that nothing teaches us about the world and how to think more effectively better than learning new languages. That is why I advocate for fluency in foreign languages. But for this to happen, language-learning needs to make a comeback as a requirement of both primary and secondary education in the United States. Learning another language benefits each learner in at least three ways – pragmatically, neurologically and culturally.”

Read the full article by Dan Everett, published October 14, 2018

Dan Everett currently serves as Dean of Arts and Sciences at Bentley University in Waltham, MA. He is well known for his work on Piraha.

Learning a foreign language opens door to greater marketability

“Careers and promotions: A second language is now becoming a vital part of the basic preparation for an increasing number of careers. I am not talking about majoring in foreign languages. Any profession today, coupled with the knowledge of a second language, prepares the professional to be ahead of the curve.

Many major U.S. corporations that currently make a high percentage of their profits from international markets are hiring professionals with a proficiency in foreign languages. Even in a tight job market, many graduates report that their foreign language skills enhance their hiring. Many employers are responding to the need to hire bilingual people by offering more money to start and higher raises throughout their staffer’s career, whether they stay home or are posted overseas.”

Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/community/lsjournal/article221326665.html#storylink=cpy
by Emmanuel Ngomsi, The Kansas City Star, November 7, 2018

Experts, Educators Say Benefits of Bilingualism Are Brushed Aside in U.S. Schools

Here is a story on the June event held by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) on “The link between foreign languages and US national security”.
by Terry West, The Washington Diplomat, September 29, 2017

Read the post: http://www.washdiplomat.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=16041:experts-educators-say-benefits-of-bilingualism-are-brushed-aside-in-us-schools&catid=1562&Itemid=428

You can also watch the full video at the site of the CFR

A journey to the East and back


Here is a brief story about Morgan Alexander Jones, MBA ’15 of the Johnson Graduate School of Management at College University, who learned Chinese early on in his life, and is now the COO of US-China Strong.

“One of the basic ways to start understanding Chinese culture is to learn the Chinese language.”
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On Capitol Hill for Language Advocacy Day


On Thursday, February 16th, more than 150 language experts from across the U.S. will descend on Capitol Hill to lobby for languages.

Dr. William P. Rivers, the Executive Director of the Joint National Committee for Languages (JNCL-NCLIS), the organization that hosts Language Advocacy Day, shares why he and hundreds of others believe that foreign languages need advocacy and how any concerned citizen can advocate for languages in their community.

Read the interview:
https://medium.com/@AC_Global/on-capitol-hill-for-language-advocacy-day-a-conversation-with-dr-william-p-rivers-866b6e2a17a2#.29hx4f2tg

Learning Mandarin – a view from the UK

 

“How Mandarin can unlock our children’s potential in an increasingly connected world”

by Mark Herbert, The Telegraph, January 10, 2017

An essay about the value of learning another language in general and Mandarin in particular. Mr. Herbert provides background information on the “Excellence in Mandarin Programme”, which was started in the UK in September 2016. The goal of the program is to educate 5,000 students by the year 2020 to become fluent in Mandarin.

Learning a foreign language revealed a world I never knew existed

pbs
Growing up in a small town in North Carolina, Lauren Collins never needed to speak a foreign language outside of high school Spanish classes. It wasn’t until she met her French-speaking husband and moved to Switzerland that she felt the need to become bilingual. She offers her humble opinion on the value of learning a new language.

PBS NewsHours, December 7, 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEbX-mDylsM

More than words

InsideHigherEducation
Princeton general-education proposal would require all students — even those already proficient in a foreign language — to study a language other than English. Most of the shrinking number of institutions with requirements let students test out of them.
by Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed, November 2, 2016

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Learning a new language can transform your experience of life

HuffIndiaThe benefits of knowing a second or a foreign language in today’s world are many. The world has turned into a global village. In this globalized existence, the knowledge of a foreign language in particular and the accompanying cultural competency are being increasingly recognized as valuable assets that give an advantage to those who possess such skills.

by Shonu Nangia, The Huffington Post India, June 30, 2016

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