Monthly Archives: September 2017

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL

It’s that time again, folks! Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL needs *YOUR* content! We’re looking for articles, annotated bibliographies, and materials reviews! You can submit one of two ways:
1. Through the Codex website at http://codex.acrlla.org
2. Or directly to this email (lowe@ulm.edu)
Regardless of which way you choose to submit, please make sure to read the Author’s Guidelines page(http://journal.acrlla.org/index.php/codex/about/submissions#authorGuidelines).

Deadline for submissions will be Friday, October 27, 2017, by 4:30pmRemember: you don’t have to be a librarian, work in Louisiana, or even be a member of ACRL or ACRL-LA to submit – we welcome submissions from staff and LIS students as well! We’re all in this together! Please feel free to share this with your colleagues!
If you have questions regarding submissions to the journal, or would like to talk to me about an idea for an article, please don’t hesitate to contact me!
Megan Lowe, Editor

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

Transforming the Information Community: NASIG 33rd Annual Conference

NASIG 33rd Annual Conference

Transforming the Information Community

June 8 to 11, 2018

Atlanta, GA

Publishers, vendors, librarians, and others in the fields of electronic resources, serials, library publishing and scholarly communication are encouraged to submit proposals relating to scholarly communication, publishing, resource acquisition, management, and discovery. Proposals based on emerging trends, case studies, and descriptive and experimental research findings are encouraged.  Proposals reflecting the conference theme will be especially valued.

As we have in recent years, the PPC specifically welcomes programs focusing on the Core Competencies that the NASIG Core Competency Task Forces developed for Electronic Resources Librarians, Print Serials Management, and Scholarly Communication Librarians. Please refer to the Core Competencies at https://goo.gl/hDbvyu

Program topics inspired by the Core Competencies include:

  • Electronic resource life cycle and management
  • Collection analysis and development
  • Standards and systems of cataloging and classification, metadata, and indexing
  • Licensing and legal framework
  • Standards, initiatives, and best practices
  • Personal qualities of electronic and/or print serials resources librarians as defined in the NASIG Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians and Print Serials Management.
  • Scholarly communication (copyright, institutional repositories, publishing, data management)
  • Life cycle of print serials
  • Workflow of print resources
  • Effective communication with those within and outside the library community
  • Supervision and management of staff working in areas included in the core competencies
  • Management of projects related to electronic and/or print resources or scholarly communication

Please use the online form at https://proposalspace.com/calls/d/800  to submit a proposal or program or idea. This Call for Proposals opens on September 18, 2017 and will close on November 15, 2017.

Please note the following:

  • The PPC welcomes proposals that are still in the formative stages, and may work with potential presenters to focus their proposals further.
  • Proposals should name any particular products or services that are integral to the content of the presentation. However, as a matter of NASIG policy, programs should not be used as a venue to promote or attack any product, service, or institution.
  • Time management issues generally limit each session to one to three speakers for conference sessions. Panels of four (4) or more speakers are discouraged and must be discussed in advance with the Program Planning Committee (prog-plan@nasig.org)
  • Please refer to the NASIG reimbursement policy for reimbursement of speaker expenses.
  • All session speakers must complete a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) prior to speaking at the conference.
  • All speakers must honor NASIG’s Code of Conduct at https://goo.gl/zrRhuc
  • NASIG may provide online live streaming of presentation sessions, and all speakers will be required to give NASIG the right to stream this content.

Inquiries may be sent to PPC at: prog-plan@nasig.org

Code4Lib 2018

Code4Lib 2018 is a loosely-structured conference that provides people working at the intersection of libraries/archives/museums/cultural heritage and technology with a chance to share ideas, be inspired, and forge collaborations. For more information about the Code4Lib community, please visit http://code4lib.org/about/.

The conference will be held at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, from February 13, 2018 – February 16, 2018.  More information about Code4lib 2018 is available on this year’s conference website http://2018.code4lib.org.

We encourage all members of the library, archives, museums, cultural heritage organizations, and technology community to submit a proposal for a prepared talk. Prepared talks should focus on one or more of the following areas:

– Projects you’ve worked on which incorporate innovative implementation of existing technologies and/or development of new software

– Tools and technologies – How to get the most out of existing tools, standards, and protocols (and ideas on how to make them better)

– Technical issues – Big issues in library technology that are worthy of community attention or development

– Relevant non-technical issues – Concerns of interest to the Code4Lib community which are not strictly technical in nature, e.g. collaboration, diversity, organizational challenges, etc.

In order to provide increased opportunities for a diversity of speakers and topics, all presentations will be listed by title and description only during the voting period. Speaker names will not be included until the program is posted. We will also be soliciting 10, 15, and 20 minute talks. You’ll be asked to indicate which talk lengths you would be willing to accommodate for your proposal. In addition, we are holding a poster session at the conference. If you would be interested in presenting your topic as a poster, please indicate so on the submission form.

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdtLIIPmQeOJRUoPDl6mEj0thtmV3qu4Me9z8-ffbne0qUqTw/viewform?usp=sf_link

As in past years, the Code4Lib community will vote on proposals that they would like to see included in the program. The top 10 proposals are guaranteed a slot of their preferred length at the conference. The Program Committee will curate the remainder of the program in an effort to ensure diversity in program content and presenters. Community votes will, of course, still weigh heavily in these decisions.

Presenters whose proposals are selected for inclusion in the program will have conference registration slots held for them (up to 2 speakers per talk). In addition, panel participants will have registration slots held. The standard conference registration fee will apply.

Proposals can be submitted through Sunday, October 15,, 2017 at midnight PST (GMT−8). Voting will start on Monday, October 23, 2017 and continue through Monday, November 13, 2017.

**The URL to submit votes will be announced on the Code4Lib website and mailing list and will require an active (free) code4lib.org account to participate. The final list of presentations will be announced in December. **

Thank you,

The Code4Lib 2018 Program Committee

18th Distance Library Services Conference

Proposals for panel sessions, poster sessions, and workshops are being accepted for the 18th Distance Library Services Conference. The conference will be held April 11-13, 2018, in San Antonio, TX.

Panel Sessions:

Panel sessions are an opportunity for three or four presenters from different institutions to interactively address an issue of importance to distance librarianship and should focus on helping attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic. Active participation is an important element of these sessions, so panelists are encouraged to engage in debate, pose questions to the audience or each other, and help the audience engage actively.

Poster Sessions:

Poster sessions provide an informal forum to report on innovative projects, introduce new services and resources, or test research ideas of interest to distance librarianship. Posters should be a creative visual representation of a topic, including graphs, tables, charts, and images. A contest will be held to encourage creativity in poster design and content. Attendees will vote on their favorite posters and the winning poster will be awarded a $50 Amazon gift certificate.

Workshops:

Workshops are two (2) hour sessions that provide active learning opportunities for attendees. Participants will engage an issue, learn a new skill, or develop an action plan or other activity where hands-on learning is integral. Workshops should allow participants to be involved in and contribute to the learning process and the learning experience should excite and encourage the participants to be fully engaged. Participants should leave the workshop with ideas, information, techniques, or skills to share with their colleagues. Workshops will be held on the first day of the conference, April 11, 2018..

Proposals will be accepted through Oct. 1, 2017. To submit a proposal, please visit http://libguides.cmich.edu/dls2018/call_for_proposals.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thad Dickinson

Coordinator, Distance Library Services Conference

Central Michigan University

thad.dickinson@cmich.edu

Coalition for Networked information (CNI)

Proposals are now being accepted for project briefings to be presented at CNI’s Fall 2017 CNI Membership Meeting on December 11-12 in Washington, DC, at the Omni Shoreham Hotel.
Project briefings are 30-minute, 45-minute or one-hour sessions that focus on a discussion of a hot topic, or on a specific institutional/organizational project related to digital information; the submission process is open to all, including non-members. A limited number of project briefings are accepted.
A link to the online submission form is available here:
Submissions are due no later than Wednesday, October 11.
Follow this meeting: #cni17f
We look forward to seeing you in DC!

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by October 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

 

Creativity and Personal Growth for Librarians

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of aspects and angles of the library profession as a creative endeavor, within the library walls and beyond. We are looking for ideas that can serve as a foundation, to incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. The focus is on library staff professional and personal growth and development, NOT creative programming and services for patrons.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by October 30, 2017, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com