Category Archives: Diversity

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

Conference Announcement & Call for Proposals:

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

MILEX 2019 Spring Conference

Thursday, April 25, 2019, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Loyola Graduate Center, 8890 McGaw Rd, Columbia, MD

(Registration forthcoming)

The Maryland Information Literacy Exchange (MILEX) is a collaborative of Maryland academic librarians to promote information literacy in higher education.

Join us at this year’s MILEX Spring Conference featuring presentations on the role of libraries in culturally responsive teaching.  A keynote will be given by Ashleigh D. Coren, Special Collections Librarian for Teaching and Learning at University of Maryland Libraries, whose teaching focuses on diverse students and finding stories in the collection. Coren is co-developer of the LGBTQ Oral History Project at UMD, and was recognized as an Emerging Leader by ALA in 2018.

Registration fees (light breakfast and hot lunch included):

MILEX member                      $45

Non-member                           $75

Membership + Registration     $65

Student                                    $20

For more information, visit the MILEX website: www.milexmd.org.

Call for Proposals! (Due March 4th)

We’re looking for presentations that demonstrate how librarians are engaging in culturally responsive teaching. Submit proposals to the chair of the conference committee, Jordan Sly, at jsly@umd.edu by Monday, March 4, 2019.

Include the following in your proposal:

1.       In a paragraph or two, what your presentation will entail; a general outline is fine.

2.       Student learning outcomes (what will students learn/develop as a result of the activity)

3.       Optimal amount of time that should be allotted for your presentation

4.       Any resources you will need

5.       Short biographical statement

Registration will open on March 12 at the MILEX website:www.milexmd.org/events.html.

Register early, as space will be limited.

Please don’t hesitate to contact Jordan Sly with your questions and concerns: 301-405-9290.

Funds raised will be administered by the University System of Maryland Foundation, Inc. for the benefit of MILEX – Maryland Information Literacy Exchange.

Pitfalls of neutrality: What does inclusivity mean in libraries?

The ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) is looking for panelists for our accepted program at ALA Annual 2019 in Washington, D.C. The program is called “Pitfalls of neutrality: What does inclusivity mean in libraries?” It is scheduled for Saturday, June 19, at 9:00 am. Each panelist will have approximately 10-15 minutes to speak. To be considered as a panelist, please submit a brief summary of the issue(s) you would address, including your type of library to Laura Bonella (laurab@ksu.edu) by Monday, January 21.

Program description: Librarians are committed to promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion, but what does this mean in today’s political climate? We are frequently required to make decisions that pit free speech against the comfort and safety of other patrons (e.g. allowing political or hate groups to use our meeting rooms), or called upon to defend our collection, exhibit, or program decisions in the face of patron challenges. Even our decisions about configuring the space in our libraries may create controversy – gender neutral restrooms, prayer rooms, lactation rooms, or how we make our buildings accessible.

We are looking for a diverse group of speakers who have handled these challenges and can share their experiences and how they dealt with various situations. Attendees will have the chance to ask questions and interact with the speakers and each other. We would like them to leave the program with strategies from different libraries to consider when examining their own perspectives on equity, diversity, and inclusion and how to address these issues in their libraries. The program is co-sponsored by the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom and will have a panelist from their office.

 

All the best,

Laura Bonella

2019 WGSS Program Planning chair

International Intersectionality Conference

Link to pdf: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdornsife.usc.edu%2Fassets%2Fsites%2F80%2Fdocs%2FCFR_International_Intersectionality_Conference_CFP_-_FINAL.pdf&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C0d1fe79ddcab44dba36d08d665e3e14c%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636808426748363078&sdata=5mtTTSJelpttrWskRww0BCJfmz4qezwi9LJzq1zRcyM%3D&reserved=0

Call for Papers:
International Intersectionality Conference University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, USA March 6-8, 2019
The Center for Feminist Research at the University of Southern California (USC) invites submissions of paper proposals for our 2019 Internationality Intersectionality Conference to be held on March 6-8, 2019 on the campus of USC in Los Angeles, CA. Papers presented will be considered for inclusion in a forthcoming Handbook of Intersectionality co-edited by Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro and Nira Yuval-Davis.
This year’s conference theme, “Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production,” will focus on approaches to intersectional research over time, emphasizing the role of intersectional research in shaping the scope of cutting-edge work across disciplines including but not limited to political science, public health, sociology, psychology, feminist media studies, ethnic studies, literature, social movements, law and public policy.
Proposal Guidelines:
Individual paper proposals should include a 500-word abstract, including a paper title. Please submit proposals in Word format along with contact information including name, address, and institutional affiliation to InterIntersectionality.2019@gmail.com by 11:59 PM Pacific Standard Time on January 7, 2019 to be considered. Questions can be sent to Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Director of the USC Center for Feminist Research and Conference Convener: ahancock@usc.edu
As we plan our conference in Southern California, a geographic area with a rich cultural history long before European contact, we are mindful of the multi-various ways that power is structured through space and place and how those structures interact with race, gender, gender-identity, nationality, class, [dis]ability, and sexuality.
“Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production” will explore the history of intersectional research, challenges that drive the field today, and ways to build up intersectional and cross-generational networks for the future. While the notion of echoes conjures up important thinking about haunting and the past, our theme includes and welcomes engagements with non-Western, nonlinear, and non-capitalist temporalities.
We seek papers that explore and/or expand the boundaries of intersectionality as a growing field of study. Comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinary, and cross-generational work that are either interpretive, quantitative, qualitative, or use multiple methods are welcome. Below are some topics that potential contributors might consider:
*Mapping the presence/absence of categories of difference like class or culture *Race, gender, and sexuality in the digital era
*Migration and belonging during times of war or political conflict *Scholar-activism as a practice of radicalizing feminist futures
*Language, cultural meanings, and practices of identity in politics
*Health inequality and future intersectional frameworks of care for self and others *Critical race theory and interconnections with class, gender, and sexuality *Womxn of color and public policy
*Quantitative patterns of intersectional inequality

CAPAL19: The Politics of Conversation: Identity, Community, and Communication

CAPAL/ACBAP Annual Meeting – June 2 -4, 2019 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2019

University of British Columbia

Vancouver, British Columbia

The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) invites you to participate in its annual conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2019 at the University of British Columbia on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓ əm (Musqueam) people. This conference offers librarians and allied professionals across all disciplines an alternative space to share research and scholarship, challenge current thinking about professional issues, and forge new relationships.

Theme

In keeping with the Congress 2019 theme, Circles of Conversation, the theme of CAPAL19 is Politics of Conversation: Identity, Community, and Communication.

 This conference provides an opportunity for the academic library community to critically examine and discuss the ways in which our profession is influenced by its social, political, and economic environments. By considering academic librarianship within its historical contexts, its presents, and its possible futures, and by situating it within evolving cultural frameworks and structures of power, we can better understand the ways in which academic librarianship may reflect, reinforce, or challenge these contexts both positively and negatively.

In what kinds of conversation are we or are we not engaging within the profession, academia, and civil society? How are the various identities that constitute our communities reflected (or not) within academic librarianship, and how do we engage in conversations within our own communities and with communities that we may see as external.

Potential Topics:

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they need not be limited to them):

·       Diversity: how do we ensure our circles (communities, spaces) are diverse? What are the circles available to librarians, and how do we ensure that librarians are not circumscribed by their identities within these circles? This could apply both to academic vs. public librarianship, or academic librarian vs. the broader academic community, but perhaps more importantly, it could ask these questions with respect to women, people of colour, and Indigenous librarians.

·       Intellectual and academic freedom: How do we define our responsibilities and our liberties in these areas? Are these positive or negative freedoms, especially with respect to broader communities?

·         “Imagined Communities”: It is the 35th anniversary of Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities. How do librarians see themselves in various “imagined communities” (nationality, community of practice, inter- and cross-disciplinary), and what are the politics of our participation?

·       Conversations outside the circles: how do we make our research relevant outside LIS? Is this different for different kinds of research? How do we bring public values and ideas into our work and research?

·       Labour and solidarity: how to we organize ourselves within academic librarianship; how do we connect our conversations with other library workers, other academic workers, other workers as a whole.

·       Conversations within practice/praxis: how are communications and connections established and maintained with the profession and between academic librarians and administrators, faculty, students, and other researchers.

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be original and not have been published elsewhere.

·       Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

·         For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each presenter. Please identify and provide participants’ contact information for the panel organizer.

Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an attachment in your preferred format (open formats welcome!), using the following filename convention:

 Lastname_Title.<extension>

Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chair, Sam Popowich at

Sam.Popowich [at] ualberta.ca

Deadline for Proposals is: 21/12/2018

Further information about the conference, as well as Congress 2019 more broadly, will be available soon.

Diversity, Equity, and Justice Talks: In and Beyond the Library

Members of LITA’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee are seeking to fill its ALA panel slot “Diversity, Equity, and Justice Talks: In and Beyond the Library” with presentations from three panelists interested in approaching the topic of Diversity, Equity, and Justice from their own personal and/or institutional perspective. As libraries, archives, and cultural heritage institutions attempt to embed diversity and equity into the core of their institutional practices, it can be helpful to provide ample platforms for discovering, engaging with, and highlighting powerful narratives that reflect the work we must do in order to continue pushing against institutional oppression–or to highlight where we are not pushing hard
enough.

They invite potential panelists to submit brief proposals around any topic that relates to diversity and equity work at large: employing anti-racist praxis in libraries/your library work, navigating microagressions, allyship, cultural competency–to name a few. However, any and all topics are welcome, and do not need to speak directly speak to technology in any way.

The deadline to submit is December 9.

You can find the online form here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf8GoZ4GBvd_–xCOBQ907Y4JCH0fGJKz8KzrDI57SAd55inw/viewform

If you have any questions, please reach out to the committee Chair, Jennifer Brown (jebrown@barnard.edu) or Vice Chair, Jharina Pascual (jharinapascual@hotmail.com).

Open Doors: Reaching Unserved Populations

Amigos Online Services Online Conference

As librarians, providing equitable access to all patrons should be a top priority. The patrons visiting our libraries should reflect the diversity of the communities we live in. Unfortunately, there are many populations that go under-served. How can we broaden our reach to better serve all our community?

Join Amigos Library Services by submitting a presentation sharing your experiences providing services to commonly under-served populations. Our online conference will take place on Thursday, February 28.

Suggested topics include experiences providing equitable access and services in the following categories:

§  People with disabilities

§  People of color

§  LGBTQ community

§  People experiencing poverty and/or homelessness

§  Non-English-speaking and/or multilingual populations

§  Rural, Native, and Tribal libraries

§  Bookmobiles

§  Illiteracy

§  Older adults

§  Active military and veterans

§  Incarcerated populations

If you can speak on one of these topics, or have another topic in mind, please submit your proposal here by December 16, 2018. Don’t worry if you’ve never presented online. It’s easy, and we are happy to train you and will provide technical support during your presentation.

For more information about this conference, contact Megan Bryant at bryant@amigos.org or 800-843-8482, ext. 2896.

ACRL DVC Fall 2018 Program

When: October 26, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Where: Drexel University’s Learning Terrace

Theme:  Librarians as Advocates:  Leading Activism on Your Campus and Beyond

This program seeks to provide insight into the activism and advocacy work being done in libraries in higher education across the Delaware Valley region. In times of inequity, discrimination, and social injustice, libraries have the opportunity to be institutions of resistance, understanding, and hope. We are bringing together librarians who would like to share how they have incorporated democracy, equity, intellectual freedom, and privacy into their projects and collaborations to advocate for their communities.  Successful proposals will demonstrate an analysis of the underlying power structures that motivate their efforts. Whether your advocacy work takes the form of outreach projects, pedagogical techniques, systems or application development, cataloging practice, or collaborative projects, we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work and its impact with colleagues.

Topics should be related to library leadership in social change including:

  • Services for students with marginalized identities, including documentation status
  • Poverty, food insecurity, or homelessness
  • Voter registration and electoral issues
  • Social, mental, and health-related services
  • Access and textbook-related services
  • Library-related legislation
  • Privacy
  • Diversity, inclusion, and equity
  • Workplace fairness and rights issues

The deadline to submit is September 10 with notification by September 15, 2018.

Submission Information

Proposals must include the following information:

  1. Proposal title
  2. Names, affiliations, positions, and email addresses of the presenters
  3. Preferred presentation format
    1. Option A – 10-minute lightning round presentation only
    2. Option B – 10-minute lightning round presentation and roundtable facilitation.
  4. A 250-word summary of the topic you wish to present including the points you intend to make and the way(s) you intend to engage the audience, if applicable

To propose a session please visit: https://goo.gl/forms/ZOls6D1Xker3b1o83

Questions? E-mail Jess Denke at jessicadenke@muhlenberg.edu

Advances in Library Administration and Organization Critical Librarianship and Library Management

Call for proposals

Publication due 2020

Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College

Volume Editor: David Ketchum, University of Oregon

 

The critical librarianship movement has shone light on many aspects of our profession and encouraged us to question why we do things the way we do them. One area underexplored in this moment, however, is library management: Are there management practices that need to be questioned or interrogated? Are there progressive practices that have not received the recognition they deserve?

 

ALAO seeks submissions for the “Critical Librarianship and Library Management” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to critically examine library management.

 

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:

  • Implicit bias and library management/operations
  • Retention and hiring for diversity and inclusion
  • Social justice in library leadership and management

 

This will be the first volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2020.

About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series:

ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot. Through this series, practitioners glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries.

How to submit:

We are currently seeking proposals for the 2019 volume on Critical Librarianship and Library Management. If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send a proposal including a draft abstract of 500 words or less, author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu by August 31, 2018.

Submission deadlines:

 

Submission deadline for proposals: August 31, 2018

Notification of acceptance sent by: October 31, 2018

Submission deadline for full chapters: February 28, 2019

Comments returned to authors: April 30, 2019

Submission deadline for chapter revisions: June 15, 2019

 

Preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

 

Dr. Marta Deyrup

University Libraries

Seton Hall University

Marta.deyrup@shu.edu

Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

 

Libraries: All Inclusive 2018 ILA Annual Conference

Peoria Civic Center

October 9-11, 2018

Call For Programs – IL Library Association 2018 Conference

Speakers from outside the Illinois library community will receive a one-day waiver of their registration fee.

Seeking topics including, but not limited to:

Reaching underserved populations and/or segments of your community

Building communities

Passive programming (library card not required)

Fandom

The Deadline for submission is 11:59 p.m. on Friday, March 16.

Please follow this link for more information: https://www.ila.org/events/conference-call-for-programs