Category Archives: Diversity

Urban Librarians Unite Conference

April 13th, 2018

@ Brooklyn Public Library

Theme: Library Revolution!

Submission deadline: December 28th, 2017

Do you see the revolution taking place in public libraries?  Are you helping change how we deliver information and services to patrons?  Have you been pushing the field into the 21st Century?  Have you been doing this all with limited funding?  On April 13th, Urban Librarians Unite will be holding Library Revolution! our 6th Annual Urban Librarians Unite conference at Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Library.

For Library Revolution! we are looking for the librarians who starting a revolution in their library world. It’s been a year of insane upheaval, what changes have you made in your library? How have you responded to community needs, technological changes or even just something in your day to day work? How have you fomented revolution?

We are looking for twelve speakers – Four main auditorium sessions and eight smaller “Break-out” sessions. All sessions will be an hour and a half long and will focus on a Library Revolution. Examples of what we’ve done before can be found here. We are looking for topics about the Library Revolution including but not limited to:

  • Changing how the public view libraries and/or librarians
  • Reaching out to diverse communities and changing services
  • Impact of current events on library trends
  • Innovation and changes in roles, responsibilities, services and resources
  • Impact of technology
  • Leadership and leadership development
  • Leading through Change
  • Diversity & inclusion
  • Career planning, professional development
  • Post-truth information literacy, and digital literacy
  • Civic engagement, partnerships, and community building
  • Librarians as knowledge gatekeepers, personal freedom, and privacy

Please submit your proposal via the attached form. We require a title and short description.

Proposals will be due December 28th. For questions please email us at urbanlibrariansunite@gmail.com

CAPAL18 Community, Diversity, and Education: Academic Librarianship in Challenging Times

CAPAL18

Community, Diversity, and Education:
Academic Librarianship in Challenging Times
will be held in conjunction with Congress of the Humanities and Social
Sciences 2018 at University of Regina, Saskatchewan, 29-31 May, 2018
(Preconference 28 May, 2018)

CAPAL18 provides an opportunity for academic librarians to critically examine
and discuss the ways in which collaboration, respect for differences, and
professionalism empower us at a time when the values of our profession are in
danger of being eroded, both within our universities and within the wider
world.  It is time to consider the role of academic librarianship in a
changing world and the ways in which academic librarians can challenge the
corporatization of our universities and libraries, institutional inequities,
and the attempts to deprofessionalize academic librarians.

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they
need not be limited to them):

— Challenges to academic status for librarians
–The identity of academic librarians in uncertain times
— Challenging racism in Canadian universities
–The role of academic librarians in the changing academic library environment
and culture
–The ways in which professionalism intersects with race and gender, and how
it may reinforce institutional power dynamics
–Challenges to academic freedom and intellectual freedom
–Challenges to academic integrity in a “fake news” and anti-science world
–The roles and responsibilities of academic librarians in Reconciliation
–Resisting the corporatization of universities and academic libraries
–Confronting barriers to diversity in academic libraries

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as
proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be
original and not have been published elsewhere.
•        Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual
papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation
title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

•        For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than
400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical
statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each
presenter. Please provide contact information for all participants.
•        Incomplete proposals or proposals that exceed the requested word count
will not be considered.
Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a
paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an
attachment as a .doc or .docx file, using the following filename conventions:
•        Lastname_Keywordoftopic.docx
Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chairs, Lorna Rourke and Laura Koltutsky, at capalproposals@gmail.com.
Deadline for Proposals is: 22 December, 2017
Further information about CAPAL 2018 and Congress 2018 are available at:
http://conference.capalibrarians.org/  &  https://www.congress2018.ca/

Please note:  The University of Regina is pleased to offer the Congress 2018
Graduate Student Travel Awards (https://www.congress2018.ca/student-funding), funded by the President’s Planning Committee for Congress 2018. Fully-qualified graduate students and recent PhD graduates will be able to apply for a subsidy of up to $500 towards accommodation, meal, & bookstore credits to facilitate participation at Congress 2018.

3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018: Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community

Call for Proposals

Deadline November 15, 2017

Submit proposals here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference is promoted by the Joint Council for Librarians of Color whose purpose is “To promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and to host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color every four to five years.”

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision makers interested in exploring inclusive policies and practices in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC strives to deepen connections across constituencies, create spaces for dialogue, promote the telling and celebrating of one’s stories, and encourage the transformation of libraries into more democratic and diverse organizations. This conference is sponsored by the five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association: the American Indian Library Association (AILA), Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA). JCLC 2018 follows the first gathering in 2006 in Dallas, TX and the second in 2012 in Kansas City, MO.

The 2018 JCLC Steering Committee invites you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community”. Proposal submission deadlines are listed below.

What’s on the page:

JCLC Tracks and Topics

JCLC 2018 seeks conference session presentations in all areas of diversity, including, but not limited to, the topics below, focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.” Ideal sessions will provide:

  • Insights, skills, tools, and strategies that stress solutions, implementation, and practical applications
  • Highlight exemplary programs, approaches, and models
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, and understanding around significant issues affecting conference constituencies
  • Discuss efforts to create more inclusive environments, curricula, and programs.

The Program Committee will strive to select a balance of academic, school, tribal, special, and public libraries learning opportunities.

  • Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration
    Marketing; outreach to diverse populations; community collaborations; user spaces; public policy; health education; using census data and other government information; cultural programming; services to and rebuilding of communities hit with disaster; research; undocumented, urban, rural and low-income communities; etc.
  • Collections, Programs and Services
    Ethnic and multicultural collections; film and music; information literacy; children’s, youth and adult programming; programs for diverse populations; reference; instruction; grant funded programs; technical services; archives; preservation; digital inclusion; documenting traditional knowledge; research; cataloging/subject headings/controlled vocabulary; etc.
  • Bridge Building, Intersectionality and Inclusion
    Fostering awareness, acceptance, and inclusion of all communities; disabilities; gender; celebrating elders; religion; sexual orientation/LGBTQIA populations; nationality; sharing traditional knowledge; serving the incarcerated; immigrant and refugees; cross cultural issues; transnational communities; multiculturalism; best practices and model programs promoting bridge building, intersectionality, and inclusion; microaggressions; cultural humility; etc.
  • Leadership, Management and Organizational Development
    Administration; staff development/training; recruitment and retention; leadership; organizational culture; management; cultural competencies; mentoring; assessment; mid-career strategies; staff and paraprofessional issues; conflict resolution and mediation; reorganization and restructuring; leading during tight economic times; institutional change; research; fundraising; institutional racism; breaking the glass ceiling; etc.
  • Technology and Innovation
    Teaching and learning; emerging technologies; e-repositories; social networking applications; digitization; equal access for users; library tools; e-books; mobile devices; widgets; mashups; online learning and collaboration; open access movements; social aspects of technology and implications for use; videos; etc.

Session Formats

All sessions are 75 minutes long with the exception of preconferences (Preconference programs may be either 4 or 8 hours) and may take one of the following formats:

  • Panel Presentation
  • Individual Paper/Presentation
  • Roundtable
  • Workshop
  • Poster Session
  • Film with discussion
  • Preconferences

JCLC will also accept proposals in different formats (other than those listed above) that will excite, engage, and create a new learning environment for conference attendees. Proposals may be accepted on the condition of combining proposed sessions into a single session with other proposals or as a different format than originally accepted.

Prohibited Submissions

Program proposals promoting or selling products/services during conference sessions will not be accepted.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on November 15, 2017. No late submissions will be accepted. Notifications of proposal selection will be made on a rolling basis beginning on January 15, 2018 and ending on February 15, 2018.

Selection Criteria

All proposals will be reviewed by the JCLC Program Committee. Proposals are evaluated on quality and clarity of content, uniqueness of topic, relevance to conference attendees, ability to engage the audience, and the relationship of the proposal to the mission and theme of the conference, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.”
All presenters of selected programs must register for the conference. Only registered participants will be allowed to present.

Proceedings

JCLC will encourage the selected conference presenters, in all formats, to publish their content using the online conference program application. The content will be directly linked to the program abstract and remain posted for one year. It is recommended that all program content be uploaded by the day of the presentation. Authors will retain copyright to their original work and are encouraged to publish their content in other established venues.

Submission site

Please submit your proposal here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

Questions

Many questions can be answered on the FAQ. Questions not answered in the FAQs may be sent to the JCLC Programs Committee at jclc2018programs@gmail.com.


2018 Transformative Learning Conference

March 8-9, 2018
Downtown Oklahoma City, OK

March 7, 2018, Pre-Conference Institute, Edmond, OK

For more information go to http://sites.uco.edu/central/tl/conference/2018conference/about.asp

The Transformative Learning Conference emerged seven years ago as a venue for UCO faculty to share their experiences, strategies, and challenges of incorporating transformative learning into their courses.  In 2015, the Conference moved off campus and became a national discussion on applied TL.  The following year, international scholars joined the Conference.  In the last several years, around 350 scholars have joined the discussion each year, considering everything from conceptualizing and measuring TL to creating official student records of their transformative education. This year’s conference includes a pre-conference institute, March 7, 2018, for teams of two or more from institutions launching or implementing “Beyond Disciplinary Learning,” which we refer to as “STLR” (Student Transformative Learning Record) at UCO.

 

Mission

The mission of the Transformative Learning Conference is to support, promote, and foster individuals interested in discussing, implementing, or measuring transformative education. In 2006, the hosting institution, the University of Central Oklahoma, added transformative learning to its mission:

 

The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) exists to help students learn by providing transformative education experiences to students so that they may become productive, creative, ethical and engaged citizens and leaders serving our global community. 

 

Important Deadlines

Registration Opens:  June 8, 2017 

Deadline for Early Pricing of Registration: January, 12, 2018 at 11:59 PM

Regular rates apply: January 13, 2018 – March 9, 2018

Call for Proposals Opens:  August 29, 2017

Deadline for Submissions: November 26, 2017 at 11:59 pm

Deadline for Notification of Acceptance by: December 18, 2017

Accepted authors that have not registered for the conference by January 12, 2018 will be withdrawn from the program

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided

CALL FOR CHAPTER CONTRIBUTORS

The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and
beyond.

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.
Trump

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or
contemporarily

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT (hbmgpt@rit.edu) by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration
elsewhere.

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

Violence Against Women: Special Issue on Gender-based violence on college campuses

Submissions for a special issue of the journal *Violence Against Women* are
sought from scholars and community activists working to end gender based
violence on college campuses. Papers in the special issue will examine
activist and other transformational responses to GBV by students, faculty
and staff, and the ways they are enacting change locally to challenge the
scaffolding of GBV, often described as rape culture (Buchwald, Fletcher &
Roth, 2005; Henry & Powell, 2014), lad culture (Phipps and Young, 2015),
and laddism (Lewis, Marine, & Kenney, 2016). The prioritising of
programmatic, solution-based interventions to tackle GBV in the university
context poses unique challenges to meaningful cultural transformation,
which this volume will productively explore. The special issue provides an
opportunity for critical engagement with institutional policies and
practices in terms of how they contribute to or inhibit cultural
transformation.

Abstracts of 250 words should be submitted by *August 7th* to *Dr. Ruth
Lewis *(ruth.lewis@northumbria.ac.uk) and *Dr. Susan Marine* (
marines@merrimack.edu).

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Michigan.
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
July 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, YOUR LAST NAME on subject
line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJBIDE:

The International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) investigates critically the positioning of diverse individuals in formal and informal contexts of education – from kindergarten to adult education, but also lifelong learning. Diversities here refer to different identity markers such as ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, citizenship, disabilities, educational background and language(s). IJBIDE is clearly positioned within a non-essentialist and non-culturalist perspective. IJBIDE also aims to promote original research methods by linking up macro- and micro- methodological approaches. The journal is fully blind peer reviewed by the best experts in the field and publishes empirical and conceptual research and case studies from around the world.

Indices of IJBIDE:

  • Cabell’s Directories
  • Google Scholar
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJBIDE:

The topics covered in the contributions include (but are not limited to):

  • The perception, place and role of diversities in (teacher) education (students, teachers, student-teachers, leadership, etc.)
  • Bullying, bias, segregation and discrimination in education
  • Academic and student mobility and diversities
  • Diversities and informal learning
  • School choices and diversities
  • Teaching about diversities (intercultural/global competence)
  • Forms of discrimination and segregation in education
  • Place/space and diversities
  • Diversities and digital educational technologies
  • Links between ‘home’ and school in relation to diversities (parents)
  • Media representations of diversities in education
  • Assessment, evaluation and diversities
  • Role and place of diversities in education policies
  • Diversities within a school system
  • Teaching material and diversities
  • History of diversities in education
  • Interactions between and integration of students of diverse backgrounds
  • Role and place of teachers of diverse backgrounds
  • Perception and integration of the ‘foreigner’ in education
  • Diversities and multilingual education
  • Methods or methodologies/conceptual approaches and researching diversities
  • Reflexivity and/or critical awareness around diversities in education
  • Social Action and Diversities
  • The commodification or processes of commodifying of diversities in education
  • Inclusive education and diversities
  • The impact of globalization on diversities
  • Social processes and diversification/differentiation
  • Multimodality and diversities

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-bias-identity-diversities/125026