Category Archives: Education

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference
3rd National Conference: March 21-22, 2018
http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/
Call for Proposals (Deadline October 6, 2017)

March 21 (Wednesday) – March 22 (Thursday), 2018

Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/

Proposals are now being accepted for the 3rd National Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference, a 2-day event focused on all aspects of the first year experience and the personalization of outreach and services for incoming students. The conference will be hosted by Kelvin Smith Library at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio) on March 21-22, 2018.

The conference will focus on starting library initiatives to support first year students, assessing outcomes of services and resources, and building the collaborative relationships throughout the organization to prepare a holistic approach to student success and retention.

The 2 days will feature 1-2 keynotes panel discussions, and lightning talks, surrounded by a number of concurrent sessions organized around proposed tracks of interest. Participants are welcomed from all types of organizations and levels of staffing. Programming will be offered to improve established programs or prepare for a new initiative.

We are accepting proposals for concurrent sessions organized by tracks, panel discussions, lightning presentations, and poster presentations. We welcome all proposals for consideration, but are particularly interested in sessions that consider:

  • How to measure impact & success; assessment methods

  • Relationship building (internal & external to the library)

  • The “future” and next generation programs

  • Focus on international students

  • Focus on underserved communities or at risk communities

  • Transition to 2nd year support

  • Strategic ways for engagement and increased participation with FYE Students

  • Other topics will be considered

Other topics may include:

  • “Personal Librarian” services such as direct interactions, custom experiences, etc.

  • Starting new programs or initiatives

  • Views and goals of campus administrators

  • Student stories & testimonies

  • Staffing models

  • Overall role within a larger information literacy instruction program

  • Events, programs, orientations, etc.

  • Challenges & concerns

  • Marketing & communication

  • Diversity issues and approaches

  • Developing relationship with parents

Submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking about personal librarian programs and first-year experiences. Acceptance will be competitive and conducted by a conference committee consisting of Kelvin Smith Library employees and virtual committee members from several university libraries involved in personal librarian and/or FYE programs.

Registration costs will be the responsibility of each attendee and presenter, and will not be covered by the conference organizers.

SUBMIT PROPOSALS BY October 6, 2017

Web Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/GUAHRsSadQOJd0sr1

Email questions to Brian Gray: bcg8@case.edu

YTH Live 2018

YTH Live is the conference that ignites innovation in youth, technology, and health. Plus, this year will mark the 10 year anniversary of the conference making it the biggest yet.

YTH Live takes place May 6-7, 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The conference includes sessions on video games, non profit outreach, mobile apps, texting, and social media all being used to address issues like mental health, reproductive rights, peer education, drug use, HIV and AIDS, STDs, and more. Information can be found at http://yth.org/ythlive/about/

At YTH Live 2018, attendees will meet youth leaders, app developers, hackers, designers, health workers, policymakers, as well as educators, researchers, and other advocates who are using technology to make a difference in the health and wellness of youth.

Learn more at yth.org/live and register at yth.org/register. Click here for additional assets and if you need drafted social media posts or any other materials let us know and we would be happy to provide those for you.

Our call for abstracts is now open, where those who want to share an innovative project, campaign, program, or research in youth health, technology, and health tech are invited to submit a proposal, to be considered to speak at our conference. The deadline for this is Friday, October 27, 2017. We’d love to invite you to submit and to share this opportunity with your networks!

8th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference

Emerging Learning Design is now accepting proposals for the

8th Annual Emerging Learning Design Conference (#ELDc18)

May 31st – June 1st, 2018 at Montclair State University.

 

The theme for this year’s conference is

From Learner Centered to Learner Experience (LX)

 

Education has changed more in the last 25 years than the 250 before that. Whereas once the norm was teacher-focused, sage-on-the-stage, a shift is still going on that places the learner at the core of the learning experience.  Driven by the wide adoption of design thinking and user experience processes, LX pushes to make sure the learner voice is integrated more purposefully by sharing the experience development and iteration process with those for whom it is designed.

 

From an emphasis on scaffolding and creating software with Learner Centered Design to the wide adoption of design thinking and user experience processes with Learning Experience (LX) Design the goal continues to be to create effective and meaningful experiences for the learner.  ELDc18 seeks to bring together diverse voices and innovative approaches to designing with the learner in mind.

 

The following topics are examples, but are in no way exhaustive or limited:

  • How might learners be involved in the design and evaluation of learning experiences?
  • What are examples of personalized learning and what can we learn from these experiments?
  • How can we use learning analytics to better understand aspects of learning experiences?
  • What are some organizational approaches to incorporating user experience research and iteration into the learning design process?

 

Submission are encouraged that tie to the theme, our mission, or, any of our ELDc18 Keywords

 

ELDc18 Submission Information

  • Proposal Deadline: November 1, 2017
  • Visit the ELDc18 Conference Website for
    • Proposals Submission Form
    • Session Types & Keywords
    • FAQs

Join our digital community Google Group at bit.ly/eldcommunity

Join us on Facebook for ELDc and ELDjGoogle+, Twitter, and LinkedIn!

 

ELD conferences provide physical space for the ongoing discussion of how pedagogy, research, and scholarship can be be enhanced and transformed by technology. The ELD Annual Conference is a space designed to showcase innovation as well as to engage in a vibrant and dynamic discourse. The ELD Annual Conference makes its home at Montclair State University (MSU.)

 

Please contact eldc.program@gmail.com for more information.

16th International Conference on Education and Information Systems, Technologies and Applications: EISTA 2018

Please consider contributing by submitting an article in the area “Educational Technologies” or any other included in the 16th International Conference on Education and Information Systems, Technologies and Applications: EISTA 2018 (http://www.2018iiisconf.org/eista), to be held on July 8 – 11, 2018, in Orlando, Florida, USA, jointly with:

  • The 12th International Multi-Conference on Society, Cybernetics, and Informatics: IMSCI 2018
  • The 22nd World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics: WMSCI 2018
  • The 11th International Multi-Conference on Engineering and Technological Innovation: IMETI 2018

The respective web sites of the above events and the others being jointly organized can be found at the general CFP posted at: http://www.2018iiisconf.org/cfp-summer2018.asp

To submit your article, please click the “Authors” tab on the conference website. Submissions for face-to-face and virtual presentations are both accepted.

The deadlines for this first CFP are the following:

  • October 10th, 2017: Article submissions
  • October 10th, 2017: Invited session proposals
  • November 23rd, 2017: Notifications of acceptance
  • December 14th, 2017: Uploading of camera-ready or final version

IMSCI/EISTA and all its collocated events are being indexed by Elsevier’s SCOPUS since 2005. The 2018 proceedings will also be sent to Elsevier’s SCOPUS.

Authors of early submissions to EISTA 2018 (or any of its collocated events) and, consequently, of early acceptances and registrations will be:

  1. Considered in the selection of keynote speakers because this selection will need additional reviews.
  2. Invited for submitting a second paper on special topics; which, if accepted, will require no additional fee for its presentation. These topics, which will be selected by the Organizing Committee, are very important topics, but are not necessarily among the usual grants priorities. The IIIS will finance this kind of papers which are important for many authors but are not among the priorities of policy makers in organizations which might financially be supporting participations in conferences.

Details about the following issues have also been included at the URLs given above:

  • Pre- and post-conference virtual sessions.
  • Virtual participation.
  • Two-tier reviewing combining double-blind and non-blind methods.
  • Access to reviewers’ comments and evaluation average.
  • Waiving the registration fee of effective invited session organizers.
  • Best papers awards.
  • Publication of best papers in the Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics, and Informatics (JSCI), which is indexed in EBSCO, Cabell, DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals), and Google Scholar, and listed in Cabell Directory of Publishing Opportunities and in Ulrich’s Periodical Directory. (All papers to be presented at the conference will be included in the conference printed and electronic proceedings)

Please consider forwarding to the appropriate groups who might be interested in submitting contribution to the above mentioned collocated events. New information and deadlines are posted on the conference and the IIIS web site (especially at the URL provided above).

Best regards,

EISTA 2018 Organizing Committee

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

18th Distance Library Services Conference

Proposals for panel sessions, poster sessions, and workshops are being accepted for the 18th Distance Library Services Conference. The conference will be held April 11-13, 2018, in San Antonio, TX.

Panel Sessions:

Panel sessions are an opportunity for three or four presenters from different institutions to interactively address an issue of importance to distance librarianship and should focus on helping attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic. Active participation is an important element of these sessions, so panelists are encouraged to engage in debate, pose questions to the audience or each other, and help the audience engage actively.

Poster Sessions:

Poster sessions provide an informal forum to report on innovative projects, introduce new services and resources, or test research ideas of interest to distance librarianship. Posters should be a creative visual representation of a topic, including graphs, tables, charts, and images. A contest will be held to encourage creativity in poster design and content. Attendees will vote on their favorite posters and the winning poster will be awarded a $50 Amazon gift certificate.

Workshops:

Workshops are two (2) hour sessions that provide active learning opportunities for attendees. Participants will engage an issue, learn a new skill, or develop an action plan or other activity where hands-on learning is integral. Workshops should allow participants to be involved in and contribute to the learning process and the learning experience should excite and encourage the participants to be fully engaged. Participants should leave the workshop with ideas, information, techniques, or skills to share with their colleagues. Workshops will be held on the first day of the conference, April 11, 2018..

Proposals will be accepted through Oct. 1, 2017. To submit a proposal, please visit http://libguides.cmich.edu/dls2018/call_for_proposals.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thad Dickinson

Coordinator, Distance Library Services Conference

Central Michigan University

thad.dickinson@cmich.edu

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

ISTE 2018

 Chicago IL

June 24-27, 2018

For more information go to: https://conference.iste.org/2018/presenters/submit_proposal.php

ISTE 2018 is the place where educator-tested strategies come together with proven resources for transforming learning and teaching. It’s also the place to get connected to the brightest minds in edtech, then network with them all year long.

We seek proposals from educators at any career stage, from all backgrounds and all parts of the world, and we love to see student participation in presentations! We also welcome exhibitor proposals that demonstrate noncommercial uses of technology to transform education.

Proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. PT, September 29, 2017.

What makes a good proposal?

We’re looking for presentations that:

  • Take advantage of student-centered pedagogy; show how educators can individualize learning by differentiating instruction and introducing real-world problem-solving; and support your ideas with the latest scientific research on how students learn.
  • Enhance educators’ knowledge. Our goal is to increase both the technical knowledge and the pedagogical content knowledge of educators and teacher candidates.
  • Help develop leadership skills. Explore ways to encourage and empower educators and students to lead.
  • Advance digital age learning. Delve into systems, models, practices and strategies for creating meaningful digital age learning experiences, both virtual and face to face.
  • Address the ISTE Standards. How does your proposal support the ISTE Standards? Provide a model for achieving standards-aligned objectives.
  • Encourage audience participation. Think beyond the lecture and devise new ways to engage your audience. Our session formats include interactive lectures, BYODs, snapshots, roundtables, open-area poster sessions and more. Demonstrate the use of technology to model instructional best practices.
  • Add to the conversation around current relevant challenges, including computer science and integration of computer science into curriculum, higher ed topics and virtual reality.

 

Educational Forum Themed issue on Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Call for Manuscripts for Themed Issue

The Educational Forum

Volume 82, No. 3

Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Editors: Alan Amtzis, Tabitha Dell’Angelo, and Ryan Flessner

Due date: November 1, 2017

What is the impact of political polarization on curricula, pedagogy, funding, and other imposed policies across the educational landscape? How are P-16+ educators and school leaders responding to politically motivated intellectual and policy challenges at the school level? In what ways are teacher educators revising their materials and methods in response to political strife? How are educators negotiating political conflicts with government and community stakeholders at all levels?

For example, some educators in the UK hope to revive political education at the school level as a means to create a more civically literate society. Similarly, in the US, where the federal administration has taken controversial stances on climate change, civil rights, and immigration, many teachers are adjusting curricula and pedagogy to emphasize and retain access to social and scientific knowledge important to a just and inclusive democracy. In many countries and cultures around the globe, educational processes are being mediated by state-sponsored mandates. This themed issue seeks to explore and highlight the educational advocacy and activist work being done in the name of global literacy, social justice, and resistance in a political climate where new filters on knowledge may seek to dismantle public education and affiliated social institutions by limiting critical perspectives in students’ educational experience.

Research articles, essays, and policy briefs might address questions or ideas such as:

  • the ways schools and communities are implementing strategies that recognize and respond to conditions that contribute to (or address) education inequity
  • the methods educators are taking to actualize and maintain strong social justice stances in and out of the classroom
  • the approaches educators, students, and communities are taking to organize as participants in the growing movement to resist political agendas
  • the individual or local pedagogic practices and wide-scale reforms being implemented to ensure student access to all knowledge

These questions suggest topic areas but are not exhaustive. We encourage submissions not only from scholars and researchers but also from students, teachers, and community members.

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words, including all references.

We seek previously unpublished thematic essays or empirical research. For full instructions, please visit: http://www.kdp.org/publications/theeducationalforum/authorguidelines.php

Submission deadline: November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/utef

Please include the code “823” at the beginning of your manuscript title.

For more information, please contact the issue co-editors:

Dr. Alan Amtzis (amtzis@tcnj.edu),

Dr. Tabitha Dell’Angelo (dellange@tcnj.edu), or Dr. Ryan Flessner (rflessne@butler.edu).