Category Archives: Higher Education

EdMedia + Innovate Learning

June 25-29, 2018


For more information go to

Submissions due Jan. 30, 2018


EdMedia + Innovate Learning, the premier international conference in the field since 1987, spans all disciplines and levels of education attracting researchers and practitioners in the field from 70+ countries.

This annual conference offers a forum for the discussion and exchange of research, development, and applications on all topics related to Innovation and Education.

EdMedia + Innovate Learning is an international conference organized by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Co-sponsored by the:


The following nine themes codify the vision and goals of EdMedia + Innovate Learning for advancement and innovation in:

Advanced Technologies for Learning and Teaching

Assessment and Research

Educational Reform, Policy, and Innovation

Evaluation and Quality Improvement Advances

Global Networks, Partnerships, and Exchanges

Innovative Approaches to Learning and Learning Environments

Open Education

Technologies for Socially Responsive Learning

Virtual and Distance Education

Who Attends?

Anyone can attend and/or submit proposals to present at conference. The  conference is designed to engage:

Educators in ALL disciplines


Educational administrators


Curriculum developers

Technology & education companies

Anyone with an interest in educational media

and technology


Library Trends : Disabled Adults in Libraries

Issue title: Disabled Adults in Libraries (title is intentional)
Submission deadline: January 1, 2018
Co-editors: Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich
Submit to:
Publication date: May 2019

Nature and scope of this issue:

Though scholarship about disabilities has been robust in various social science and humanities disciplines for decades, libraries have been slow to theorize or systematically examine the experiences of dis/ability in libraries. This special issue will be geared toward the experience of being a Disabled adult in libraries, as user or worker. Through a mixture of empirical research, case studies, interviews, and theoretical papers, this issue will capture perspectives of Disabled members of our broad library community.

There are many possible approaches one can take to examine disabilities and disability theory. The approach guiding this issue is taken from an in-press work by one of the editors.

There is no universally accepted definition of disabilities or single approach to disability theory. Legalistic definitions, including those presented in the Americans with Disabilities Act and the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities tend to be exclusionary and restrictive in their ideations about humanity. By this, I mean that in their construction of disability and disabled people, they work from a deficit model in which disabled humans are treated as corporeal abnormalities. However, if one out of every seven human beings could be considered disabled, as research demonstrates, disability is a common part of human existence. For many of us, when we talk about in/accessibility in libraries, we’re not just talking about things that others experience; we’re talking about ourselves.

Critical disability studies (CDS) is one approach that offers a way of including disabled people in academic discourse. In this approach, disabled people are participants and researchers who can engage in self-reflexive critiques, not just objects of study. While some theoretical models focus on binary categories that are presented in contrast to each other, such as contrasting social and medical models or disability and impairment, CDS scholars focus on the entire lived experiences of disabled people. This allows for more complicated modes of analysis, such as acknowledging that disabilities may include both social and medical aspects.

We are intentionally seeking out reviewers and authors who have diverse experiences and backgrounds, including library workers of color, library workers who have LGBTQIA+ identities, and those who have Disabled identities. Because we anticipate that several authors will have experience both as Disabled library workers and as Disabled library users, we want to allow either or both perspectives to be incorporated into their research. However, to provide some limits on the scope of this issue, we are focusing on the library experiences of Disabled adults.

January 1, 2018 Article proposals are due
February 1, 2018 Editors will notify people if proposals are accepted
June 1, 2018 Article drafts are due
August 1, 2018 Reviewer feedback will be sent
September/October 2018 Final edits
November 1, 2018 Final manuscripts are due to the publisher

The writing style follows Chicago rules. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the style rules can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal requirements:

A complete proposal will include the following:

  • abstract of proposed article (200-300 words is preferred)
  • a short author biography — it doesn’t have to be formal at this point; we welcome casual explanations of how your background and experience influences your desire to write in this area

Submit to

If you need help with your abstract or framing your article, the Article Framework Questions used by In the Library with the Lead Pipe are very helpful:

If you plan to include statistical analysis, please let us know how you will ensure that your methodology and analysis are solid.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Jessica Schomberg, co-editor
Shanna Hollich, co-editor

eLearning Africa

eLearning Africa is the key networking event for ICT supported education, training and skills development in Africa. Bringing together high-level policy makers, decision makers and practitioners from education, business and government, eLearning Africa 2018 will take place from 26 – 28 September 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda. Call for Proposal deadline is January 30, 2018.

TechTrends special issue on learning technologies and effect on teaching and learning process

Special issue of TechTrends related to current trends, issues, and research involving emerging learning technologies and their effects on the teaching and learning process. Both research and practitioner proposals are welcome, however, all submissions should include collected data. Additional information can be found in the Call for Chapters. Deadline is January 15, 2018.

Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE)

Washington, DC

March 26-30, 2018

Final Call for Papers due: January 22, 2018

For more information go to:

SITE 2018 in Washington, DC, March 26-30, is the 29th annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education. This society represents individual teacher educators and affiliated organizations of teacher educators in all disciplines, who are interested in the creation and dissemination of knowledge about the use of information technology in teacher education and faculty/staff development. SITE is a society of the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

SITE promotes the development and dissemination of theoretical knowledge, conceptual research, and professional practice knowledge through conferences, books, projects, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (JTATE).

Global Learn 2018

Global Conference on Learning and Technology

April 17-18, 2017

University of Central Florida

Orlando, FL

Proposals due Dec. 29, 2017

For more information go to:

This annual conference serves to further the advancement and innovation in learning and technology. As the educational world becomes increasingly global, new ways to explore, learn, and share knowledge are needed. Global Learn is a means to connect and engage creative educators, researchers, consultants, training managers, policy makers, curriculum developers, entrepreneurs, and others in the topics and fields in which they are passionate. Global Learn offers an opportunity to meet and discuss their ideas, findings, and next steps.

Learning analytics and the academic library: Critical questions about real and possible futures, Special issue of Library Trends

Special issue information
Learning analytics and the academic library: Critical questions about real and possible futures
Abstract submission deadline:
April 1, 2018
Publication date:
March, 2019
Nature and scope of this issue
Learning analytics is the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs.”[1] If the academic library is the “most important observation post” for understanding how students learn, then it follows that libraries in colleges and universities should be a primary focus of data mining and analysis initiatives in higher education.[2] Integration of library data in learning analytics is fledgling at best, but there are growing calls for such activity to increase, especially to enhance a library’s ability to prove their resource expenditures and demonstrate alignment with wider institutional goals (e.g., improve learning outcomes, decrease costs, etc.).[3]
The efficacy of learning analytics is premised on an institution’s ability to identify, aggregate, and manage a wide variety and increasingly large volume of data about students, much of which needs to be identifiable in order to develop personalized, just-in-time learning interventions. So, in the fashion of other Big Data initiatives, institutions are beginning to dredge their information systems for student behaviors, personal information, and communications, all of which hold potential to reveal how students learn and uncover structural impediments to learning.
It is enticing to assume good things about library participation in learning analytics. The profession wants to provide just the right information at just the right time, and professional librarians want that information to aid students as they develop personally, academically, and professionally. Moreover, the profession seeks to further cement its position as a key player in the educational experience, and learning analytics may enable librarians to make stronger claims about their pivotal role once they gain access to new sources of data and the metrics that come from data analysis. But, like all technologies, learning analytics are not neutral; they are embedded with and driven by political agendas, which may not be congruent with—or necessarily aware of—extant values and ethical positions, such as those espoused by academic librarians and users of their libraries.[4] Consequentially, scholars and practitioners need to take a critical approach to the growing role of learning analytics in academic libraries and the wider higher education context in order to better inform conversations concerning the intended and unintended positive and negative outcomes learning analytics can bring about.
This special issue is motivated by Neil Selwyn’s position that the “purposeful pursuit of pessimism” [L1] [JK2] as it relates to educational technologies is constructive and fruitful.[5] In contrast, optimism around emerging technologies—and the denial of critical voices—perpetuates a belief that technological progress is always a good thing. While we often perceive a pessimistic attitude towards technology as destructive or equate it to traditional Luddism, there is actually much to be gained by critically questioning the political agendas driving educational technology design, adoption, and diffusion.
This issue will invite authors to explore and push back against statements that learning analytics will somehow improve academic libraries by addressing questions around political positions and value conflicts inherent to learning analytics, coded in related information systems, and embedded in emerging data infrastructures.
Instructions for submission
The guest editor requests interested parties to submit an abstract of 500 words or less, following APA format for parenthetical and reference list citations, by April 1, 2018. Abstracts should be sent to with the subject of “Library Trends: Abstract Submission.”
For full details, see the webpage at Library Trends (

9th International Conference on New Horizons in Education (INTE)

The Association of Science, Education and Technology (TASET), Governors State University and Sakarya University are pleased to invite you to the 9th “International Conference on New Horizons in Education” to be held in Paris, France on July 18-20, 2018.

The main aim of this congress is to bring scholars, researchers, educators, students, professionals and other groups interested in education to present their works in educational studies. This conference is now a well-known educational event worldwide and the number of paper submissions and attendees are increasing each year. Prospective presenters are encouraged to submit proposals for oral, poster and video presentations that offer new research and theoretical contributions in the field of education.

All accepted papers will be published in the Proceeding Book.  All English papers will be published  in TOJET ( as a Special Issue. TOJET is indexed on Scopus and ERIC.  Modified version of selected papers will be published in peer reviewed journals such as TOJNED andTOJDEL.


You can submit your abstract through or email at:

For our all conferences please visit TASET at


Proposal & Abstract Submission Deadline: Until July 13, 2018

Full Paper Submission : Until August 20, 2018

Registration: Until July 13, 2018


2018 NMC Summer Conference

The Global EdTech Forum for Higher Education, Museums, Libaries and Schools

June 12-14, 2018

Denver, CO

For more information go to:

The NMC Summer Conference (#NMC18) is a one-of-a-kind event, attracting highly skilled education professionals interested in the integration of emerging technologies and innovative approaches into teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Join us as we celebrate 25 years of sparking innovation, learning, and creativity!

Do you work every day to foster authentic learning? To improve the teaching profession? To spur innovation in your environment? The annual NMC Summer Conference is an ideal opportunity to share your work with participants who are just as passionate about driving real change in education and view edtech as an enabler. You have ideas and projects worthy of sharing, and we want to help you get them in front of people who will benefit from your vision — and help build upon it. Join us June 12-14 in Denver, Colorado and answer the call for proposals.

So, what’s it all about? Learn about the session tracks and types that will help define your proposal.


The Call for Proposals will open Monday, November 27, 2017

The Call for Proposals will close on Sunday, February 4, 2018.

Presenters will be notified in mid-March 2018.


Handbook of Research on Challenges and Opportunities in Launching a Technology-Driven International University

Call for Chapters

Propose a Chapter


November 30, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline

December 13, 2017: Notification of Acceptance

January 30, 2018: Full Chapter Submission

March 30, 2018: Review Results Returned

April 30, 2018: Revised Chapter Submission

May 15, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification

May 30, 2018: Submission of Final Chapters


Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., Information Resources Management Association (IRMA), USA

The global digital economy is rapidly increasing the demand for educated, highly trained and globally focused professionals. Launching accessible technology-driven higher learning institutions that offer a transformational educational and research experience can effectively prepare future leaders with the knowledge resources and tools they need to meet the demands of the 21st century. Launching any academic and/or research-based institution can be a challenge. There are various struggles involved in creating a robust curriculum and recruiting top-rated faculty from across the globe; while also meeting the critical facility approval and accreditation criteria to offer sound and effective academic programs and degrees to culturally diverse students from all over the world.


The aim of this comprehensive publication is to offer both empirical and theoretical research focused on the effective construction of technology-driven higher learning international universities.  Themes such as: developing an accelerated and innovative curriculum, the recruitment and retention of internationally renowned faculty and researchers to lead courses, as well as the development of an on-campus and distance learning system will be presented. Also, taking into consideration the financial and economic impacts of launching a university – specifically, how to identify the appropriate locale for universities and/or branch campuses, which will ideally complement the local interest of business sectors within the selected location.


The goal of every university should be to create a transformative impact on society through continual innovation in education, research, and entrepreneurship. Also, creating a direct connection between education and workforce development; offering programs that are designed to align with and exceed standard models and that focus on deep disciplinary knowledge, critical thinking and problem solving, leadership, communication, professional development, and interpersonal skills. Overall, assisting students with realizing their educational goals by integrating core values such as: educational excellence, student-centered course development, lifelong learning, a respectful environment, flexible learning, diversity, global leadership, research contributions, entrepreneurship, partnership, excellent service, and of course the highest quality.

Target Audience 
Entrepreneurs, practitioners, academicians, instructional designers, administrators, government officials, and independent researchers and consultants focused on digital research and scholarship, educational leadership and administration, educational marketing, educational policy, course management, instructional design, educational theory and practice, human resources in educational settings, and curriculum design.

Recommended Topics:

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Administration and faculty recruitment
  • International student recruiting programs
  • Curriculum development
  • Online learning management systems
  • Synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching
  • Blended learning programs
  • Student services for online programs
  • Online faculty professional development
  • Online education and job placement programs
  • Online programs and business partnerships
  • Licensing and accreditation processes
  • Selecting an optimal location
  • Technical considerations in facility development
  • Educational marketing techniques
  • Student retention programs
  • Putting together a business proposal and plan
  • Funding and budgeting programs and processes
  • Complementing the local business economic interests
  • Financial and economic impacts on local economy
  • Environmental sensitivity and considerations
  • Selection and design of a course delivery system
  • Design and management of technology infrastructure
  • Leadership and management of the institution
  • Managing operational aspects of the institution


Submission Procedure:

Authors are invited to submit a brief chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by November 30, 2017. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by no later than December 13, 2017 about the status of their proposals and will receive chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by January 30, 2018. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind basis. Contributors may also be requested to be engaged as reviewers for this project.

Submissions will be made in English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language paper submission may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English will use editing/proofreading services on their own. IGI Global recommends eContent Pro® Copy Editing Services.



This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit This publication is anticipated to be released as part of the 2019 copyright year.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this publication. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.


Inquiries may be directed to:
Ms. Courtney Tychinski, Managing Editor – Acquisitions and Development

Propose a Chapter