Category Archives: Higher Education

2018 NMC Summer Conference

The Global EdTech Forum for Higher Education, Museums, Libaries and Schools

June 12-14, 2018

Denver, CO

For more information go to: https://www.nmc.org/nmc-event/2018-nmc-summer-conference/

The NMC Summer Conference (#NMC18) is a one-of-a-kind event, attracting highly skilled education professionals interested in the integration of emerging technologies and innovative approaches into teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Join us as we celebrate 25 years of sparking innovation, learning, and creativity!

Do you work every day to foster authentic learning? To improve the teaching profession? To spur innovation in your environment? The annual NMC Summer Conference is an ideal opportunity to share your work with participants who are just as passionate about driving real change in education and view edtech as an enabler. You have ideas and projects worthy of sharing, and we want to help you get them in front of people who will benefit from your vision — and help build upon it. Join us June 12-14 in Denver, Colorado and answer the call for proposals.

So, what’s it all about? Learn about the session tracks and types that will help define your proposal.

Timelines

The Call for Proposals will open Monday, November 27, 2017

The Call for Proposals will close on Sunday, February 4, 2018.

Presenters will be notified in mid-March 2018.

 

Handbook of Research on Challenges and Opportunities in Launching a Technology-Driven International University

Call for Chapters

Propose a Chapter

IMPORTANT DATES

November 30, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline

December 13, 2017: Notification of Acceptance

January 30, 2018: Full Chapter Submission

March 30, 2018: Review Results Returned

April 30, 2018: Revised Chapter Submission

May 15, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification

May 30, 2018: Submission of Final Chapters

Editors

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., Information Resources Management Association (IRMA), USA

Introduction 
The global digital economy is rapidly increasing the demand for educated, highly trained and globally focused professionals. Launching accessible technology-driven higher learning institutions that offer a transformational educational and research experience can effectively prepare future leaders with the knowledge resources and tools they need to meet the demands of the 21st century. Launching any academic and/or research-based institution can be a challenge. There are various struggles involved in creating a robust curriculum and recruiting top-rated faculty from across the globe; while also meeting the critical facility approval and accreditation criteria to offer sound and effective academic programs and degrees to culturally diverse students from all over the world.

 

Objective 
The aim of this comprehensive publication is to offer both empirical and theoretical research focused on the effective construction of technology-driven higher learning international universities.  Themes such as: developing an accelerated and innovative curriculum, the recruitment and retention of internationally renowned faculty and researchers to lead courses, as well as the development of an on-campus and distance learning system will be presented. Also, taking into consideration the financial and economic impacts of launching a university – specifically, how to identify the appropriate locale for universities and/or branch campuses, which will ideally complement the local interest of business sectors within the selected location.

 

The goal of every university should be to create a transformative impact on society through continual innovation in education, research, and entrepreneurship. Also, creating a direct connection between education and workforce development; offering programs that are designed to align with and exceed standard models and that focus on deep disciplinary knowledge, critical thinking and problem solving, leadership, communication, professional development, and interpersonal skills. Overall, assisting students with realizing their educational goals by integrating core values such as: educational excellence, student-centered course development, lifelong learning, a respectful environment, flexible learning, diversity, global leadership, research contributions, entrepreneurship, partnership, excellent service, and of course the highest quality.

Target Audience 
Entrepreneurs, practitioners, academicians, instructional designers, administrators, government officials, and independent researchers and consultants focused on digital research and scholarship, educational leadership and administration, educational marketing, educational policy, course management, instructional design, educational theory and practice, human resources in educational settings, and curriculum design.

Recommended Topics:

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Administration and faculty recruitment
  • International student recruiting programs
  • Curriculum development
  • Online learning management systems
  • Synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching
  • Blended learning programs
  • Student services for online programs
  • Online faculty professional development
  • Online education and job placement programs
  • Online programs and business partnerships
  • Licensing and accreditation processes
  • Selecting an optimal location
  • Technical considerations in facility development
  • Educational marketing techniques
  • Student retention programs
  • Putting together a business proposal and plan
  • Funding and budgeting programs and processes
  • Complementing the local business economic interests
  • Financial and economic impacts on local economy
  • Environmental sensitivity and considerations
  • Selection and design of a course delivery system
  • Design and management of technology infrastructure
  • Leadership and management of the institution
  • Managing operational aspects of the institution

 

Submission Procedure:

Authors are invited to submit a brief chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by November 30, 2017. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by no later than December 13, 2017 about the status of their proposals and will receive chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by January 30, 2018. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind basis. Contributors may also be requested to be engaged as reviewers for this project.

Language:
Submissions will be made in English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language paper submission may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English will use editing/proofreading services on their own. IGI Global recommends eContent Pro® Copy Editing Services.

 

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released as part of the 2019 copyright year.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this publication. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.

Inquiries:

Inquiries may be directed to:
Ms. Courtney Tychinski, Managing Editor – Acquisitions and Development

ctychinski@igi-global.com

Propose a Chapter

International Journal of Digital Literacy and Digital Competence (IJDLDC)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJDLDC:

The mission of the International Journal of Digital Literacy and Digital Competence (IJDLDC) is to provide a platform for experts, scholars, stakeholders, and other professionals involved in the use of information communication technologies in education and society to share theories, studies, experiences, projects, instruments, and applications. The journal covers ideas concerning digital literacy and digital competence that will penetrate the whole society and create shared and commonly accepted educational paradigms to be used in academics by means of a practice-theory-practice paradigmatic approach to education. The journal publishes innovative findings from leading experts, including engineers, researchers, scientists, educators, and practitioners in the creation of hardware-software instruments in everyday education, training, and school work, but it also focuses on the methods and processes for the integration of digital technological equipments in the same contexts.

Indices of IJDLDC:

  • ACM Digital Library
  • Bacon’s Media Directory
  • Cabell’s Directories
  • DBLP
  • Google Scholar
  • INSPEC
  • JournalTOCs
  • Library & Information Science Abstracts (LISA)
  • Linguistics & Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA)
  • MediaFinder
  • PsycINFO®
  • The Standard Periodical Directory
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJDLDC:

Topics to be discussed in this journal include (but are not limited to) the following:

Definitions/features for digital literacy and digital competence
Digital competence assessment
Digital divide and digital literacy
Digital literacy and digital competence interaction with:

  • Communities of practice
  • Computer science education
  • Construction of learning environments
  • Information systems
  • Knowledge management
  • Learning organizations
  • New teaching paradigms
  • Psycho-pedagogical paradigms
  • School curricula
  • Social Networking
  • Social-technical approach to MIS use
  • Teacher profession/updating
  • Ubiquitous computing
  • Virtual learning environments
  • Web technologies

Digital literacy, digital competence, and diversely able people
Digital literacy, digital competence, and knowledge society with a special attention to:

  • E-citizenship
  • E-government
  • Lifelong learning
  • Multicultural society
  • Net generation
  • Personal knowledge management
  • Personal learning environments

Digital literacy in developing countries
Digital literacy in the large, as a need for corporate and organizations in their knowledge management strategies
Frameworks for digital literacy and digital competence analysis
National and international initiatives for digital literacy
National and international policies for digital literacy

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-digital-literacy-digital/1170

TERS 2018

 Present and publish your educational technology research!

The Pennsylvania Association for Educational Communications and Technology (PAECT) is honored to offer you the opportunity to present at the 2nd annual Technology Education Research Symposium (TERS) 2018!

Proposals are now being accepted at:

https://www.smore.com/mvnaf

Priority submission deadline for proposals — Dec. 1, 2017
Deadline for proposals — Feb. 1., 2018
*Based on availability with no assurances of acceptance*
When is TERS 2018? April 14th, 2018

Where? Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania
  • Present your educational technology research to others
  • Accepted publications will be published in Volume 2, Issue 1 of the PAECT: Technology Education Research Journal
  • Attend sessions to learn from other Ed Tech leaders and researchers

Who should attend?

Higher education faculty

Doctoral students

Educational Technology researchers

Educators

School Administrators

Corporate e-learning specialists

Instructional technology specialists

Anyone interested in educational technology research topics!

Click here to submit a proposal for presentation, publication, and to learn more about this event.

2018 Transformative Learning Conference

March 8-9, 2018
Downtown Oklahoma City, OK

March 7, 2018, Pre-Conference Institute, Edmond, OK

For more information go to http://sites.uco.edu/central/tl/conference/2018conference/about.asp

The Transformative Learning Conference emerged seven years ago as a venue for UCO faculty to share their experiences, strategies, and challenges of incorporating transformative learning into their courses.  In 2015, the Conference moved off campus and became a national discussion on applied TL.  The following year, international scholars joined the Conference.  In the last several years, around 350 scholars have joined the discussion each year, considering everything from conceptualizing and measuring TL to creating official student records of their transformative education. This year’s conference includes a pre-conference institute, March 7, 2018, for teams of two or more from institutions launching or implementing “Beyond Disciplinary Learning,” which we refer to as “STLR” (Student Transformative Learning Record) at UCO.

 

Mission

The mission of the Transformative Learning Conference is to support, promote, and foster individuals interested in discussing, implementing, or measuring transformative education. In 2006, the hosting institution, the University of Central Oklahoma, added transformative learning to its mission:

 

The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) exists to help students learn by providing transformative education experiences to students so that they may become productive, creative, ethical and engaged citizens and leaders serving our global community. 

 

Important Deadlines

Registration Opens:  June 8, 2017 

Deadline for Early Pricing of Registration: January, 12, 2018 at 11:59 PM

Regular rates apply: January 13, 2018 – March 9, 2018

Call for Proposals Opens:  August 29, 2017

Deadline for Submissions: November 26, 2017 at 11:59 pm

Deadline for Notification of Acceptance by: December 18, 2017

Accepted authors that have not registered for the conference by January 12, 2018 will be withdrawn from the program

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference
3rd National Conference: March 21-22, 2018
http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/
Call for Proposals (Deadline October 6, 2017)

March 21 (Wednesday) – March 22 (Thursday), 2018

Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/

Proposals are now being accepted for the 3rd National Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference, a 2-day event focused on all aspects of the first year experience and the personalization of outreach and services for incoming students. The conference will be hosted by Kelvin Smith Library at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio) on March 21-22, 2018.

The conference will focus on starting library initiatives to support first year students, assessing outcomes of services and resources, and building the collaborative relationships throughout the organization to prepare a holistic approach to student success and retention.

The 2 days will feature 1-2 keynotes panel discussions, and lightning talks, surrounded by a number of concurrent sessions organized around proposed tracks of interest. Participants are welcomed from all types of organizations and levels of staffing. Programming will be offered to improve established programs or prepare for a new initiative.

We are accepting proposals for concurrent sessions organized by tracks, panel discussions, lightning presentations, and poster presentations. We welcome all proposals for consideration, but are particularly interested in sessions that consider:

  • How to measure impact & success; assessment methods

  • Relationship building (internal & external to the library)

  • The “future” and next generation programs

  • Focus on international students

  • Focus on underserved communities or at risk communities

  • Transition to 2nd year support

  • Strategic ways for engagement and increased participation with FYE Students

  • Other topics will be considered

Other topics may include:

  • “Personal Librarian” services such as direct interactions, custom experiences, etc.

  • Starting new programs or initiatives

  • Views and goals of campus administrators

  • Student stories & testimonies

  • Staffing models

  • Overall role within a larger information literacy instruction program

  • Events, programs, orientations, etc.

  • Challenges & concerns

  • Marketing & communication

  • Diversity issues and approaches

  • Developing relationship with parents

Submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking about personal librarian programs and first-year experiences. Acceptance will be competitive and conducted by a conference committee consisting of Kelvin Smith Library employees and virtual committee members from several university libraries involved in personal librarian and/or FYE programs.

Registration costs will be the responsibility of each attendee and presenter, and will not be covered by the conference organizers.

SUBMIT PROPOSALS BY October 6, 2017

Web Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/GUAHRsSadQOJd0sr1

Email questions to Brian Gray: bcg8@case.edu

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

ISTE 2018

 Chicago IL

June 24-27, 2018

For more information go to: https://conference.iste.org/2018/presenters/submit_proposal.php

ISTE 2018 is the place where educator-tested strategies come together with proven resources for transforming learning and teaching. It’s also the place to get connected to the brightest minds in edtech, then network with them all year long.

We seek proposals from educators at any career stage, from all backgrounds and all parts of the world, and we love to see student participation in presentations! We also welcome exhibitor proposals that demonstrate noncommercial uses of technology to transform education.

Proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. PT, September 29, 2017.

What makes a good proposal?

We’re looking for presentations that:

  • Take advantage of student-centered pedagogy; show how educators can individualize learning by differentiating instruction and introducing real-world problem-solving; and support your ideas with the latest scientific research on how students learn.
  • Enhance educators’ knowledge. Our goal is to increase both the technical knowledge and the pedagogical content knowledge of educators and teacher candidates.
  • Help develop leadership skills. Explore ways to encourage and empower educators and students to lead.
  • Advance digital age learning. Delve into systems, models, practices and strategies for creating meaningful digital age learning experiences, both virtual and face to face.
  • Address the ISTE Standards. How does your proposal support the ISTE Standards? Provide a model for achieving standards-aligned objectives.
  • Encourage audience participation. Think beyond the lecture and devise new ways to engage your audience. Our session formats include interactive lectures, BYODs, snapshots, roundtables, open-area poster sessions and more. Demonstrate the use of technology to model instructional best practices.
  • Add to the conversation around current relevant challenges, including computer science and integration of computer science into curriculum, higher ed topics and virtual reality.

 

Educational Forum Themed issue on Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Call for Manuscripts for Themed Issue

The Educational Forum

Volume 82, No. 3

Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Editors: Alan Amtzis, Tabitha Dell’Angelo, and Ryan Flessner

Due date: November 1, 2017

What is the impact of political polarization on curricula, pedagogy, funding, and other imposed policies across the educational landscape? How are P-16+ educators and school leaders responding to politically motivated intellectual and policy challenges at the school level? In what ways are teacher educators revising their materials and methods in response to political strife? How are educators negotiating political conflicts with government and community stakeholders at all levels?

For example, some educators in the UK hope to revive political education at the school level as a means to create a more civically literate society. Similarly, in the US, where the federal administration has taken controversial stances on climate change, civil rights, and immigration, many teachers are adjusting curricula and pedagogy to emphasize and retain access to social and scientific knowledge important to a just and inclusive democracy. In many countries and cultures around the globe, educational processes are being mediated by state-sponsored mandates. This themed issue seeks to explore and highlight the educational advocacy and activist work being done in the name of global literacy, social justice, and resistance in a political climate where new filters on knowledge may seek to dismantle public education and affiliated social institutions by limiting critical perspectives in students’ educational experience.

Research articles, essays, and policy briefs might address questions or ideas such as:

  • the ways schools and communities are implementing strategies that recognize and respond to conditions that contribute to (or address) education inequity
  • the methods educators are taking to actualize and maintain strong social justice stances in and out of the classroom
  • the approaches educators, students, and communities are taking to organize as participants in the growing movement to resist political agendas
  • the individual or local pedagogic practices and wide-scale reforms being implemented to ensure student access to all knowledge

These questions suggest topic areas but are not exhaustive. We encourage submissions not only from scholars and researchers but also from students, teachers, and community members.

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words, including all references.

We seek previously unpublished thematic essays or empirical research. For full instructions, please visit: http://www.kdp.org/publications/theeducationalforum/authorguidelines.php

Submission deadline: November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/utef

Please include the code “823” at the beginning of your manuscript title.

For more information, please contact the issue co-editors:

Dr. Alan Amtzis (amtzis@tcnj.edu),

Dr. Tabitha Dell’Angelo (dellange@tcnj.edu), or Dr. Ryan Flessner (rflessne@butler.edu).