Category Archives: Higher Education

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference
3rd National Conference: March 21-22, 2018
http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/
Call for Proposals (Deadline October 6, 2017)

March 21 (Wednesday) – March 22 (Thursday), 2018

Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/

Proposals are now being accepted for the 3rd National Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference, a 2-day event focused on all aspects of the first year experience and the personalization of outreach and services for incoming students. The conference will be hosted by Kelvin Smith Library at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio) on March 21-22, 2018.

The conference will focus on starting library initiatives to support first year students, assessing outcomes of services and resources, and building the collaborative relationships throughout the organization to prepare a holistic approach to student success and retention.

The 2 days will feature 1-2 keynotes panel discussions, and lightning talks, surrounded by a number of concurrent sessions organized around proposed tracks of interest. Participants are welcomed from all types of organizations and levels of staffing. Programming will be offered to improve established programs or prepare for a new initiative.

We are accepting proposals for concurrent sessions organized by tracks, panel discussions, lightning presentations, and poster presentations. We welcome all proposals for consideration, but are particularly interested in sessions that consider:

  • How to measure impact & success; assessment methods

  • Relationship building (internal & external to the library)

  • The “future” and next generation programs

  • Focus on international students

  • Focus on underserved communities or at risk communities

  • Transition to 2nd year support

  • Strategic ways for engagement and increased participation with FYE Students

  • Other topics will be considered

Other topics may include:

  • “Personal Librarian” services such as direct interactions, custom experiences, etc.

  • Starting new programs or initiatives

  • Views and goals of campus administrators

  • Student stories & testimonies

  • Staffing models

  • Overall role within a larger information literacy instruction program

  • Events, programs, orientations, etc.

  • Challenges & concerns

  • Marketing & communication

  • Diversity issues and approaches

  • Developing relationship with parents

Submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking about personal librarian programs and first-year experiences. Acceptance will be competitive and conducted by a conference committee consisting of Kelvin Smith Library employees and virtual committee members from several university libraries involved in personal librarian and/or FYE programs.

Registration costs will be the responsibility of each attendee and presenter, and will not be covered by the conference organizers.

SUBMIT PROPOSALS BY October 6, 2017

Web Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/GUAHRsSadQOJd0sr1

Email questions to Brian Gray: bcg8@case.edu

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

ISTE 2018

 Chicago IL

June 24-27, 2018

For more information go to: https://conference.iste.org/2018/presenters/submit_proposal.php

ISTE 2018 is the place where educator-tested strategies come together with proven resources for transforming learning and teaching. It’s also the place to get connected to the brightest minds in edtech, then network with them all year long.

We seek proposals from educators at any career stage, from all backgrounds and all parts of the world, and we love to see student participation in presentations! We also welcome exhibitor proposals that demonstrate noncommercial uses of technology to transform education.

Proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. PT, September 29, 2017.

What makes a good proposal?

We’re looking for presentations that:

  • Take advantage of student-centered pedagogy; show how educators can individualize learning by differentiating instruction and introducing real-world problem-solving; and support your ideas with the latest scientific research on how students learn.
  • Enhance educators’ knowledge. Our goal is to increase both the technical knowledge and the pedagogical content knowledge of educators and teacher candidates.
  • Help develop leadership skills. Explore ways to encourage and empower educators and students to lead.
  • Advance digital age learning. Delve into systems, models, practices and strategies for creating meaningful digital age learning experiences, both virtual and face to face.
  • Address the ISTE Standards. How does your proposal support the ISTE Standards? Provide a model for achieving standards-aligned objectives.
  • Encourage audience participation. Think beyond the lecture and devise new ways to engage your audience. Our session formats include interactive lectures, BYODs, snapshots, roundtables, open-area poster sessions and more. Demonstrate the use of technology to model instructional best practices.
  • Add to the conversation around current relevant challenges, including computer science and integration of computer science into curriculum, higher ed topics and virtual reality.

 

Educational Forum Themed issue on Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Call for Manuscripts for Themed Issue

The Educational Forum

Volume 82, No. 3

Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Editors: Alan Amtzis, Tabitha Dell’Angelo, and Ryan Flessner

Due date: November 1, 2017

What is the impact of political polarization on curricula, pedagogy, funding, and other imposed policies across the educational landscape? How are P-16+ educators and school leaders responding to politically motivated intellectual and policy challenges at the school level? In what ways are teacher educators revising their materials and methods in response to political strife? How are educators negotiating political conflicts with government and community stakeholders at all levels?

For example, some educators in the UK hope to revive political education at the school level as a means to create a more civically literate society. Similarly, in the US, where the federal administration has taken controversial stances on climate change, civil rights, and immigration, many teachers are adjusting curricula and pedagogy to emphasize and retain access to social and scientific knowledge important to a just and inclusive democracy. In many countries and cultures around the globe, educational processes are being mediated by state-sponsored mandates. This themed issue seeks to explore and highlight the educational advocacy and activist work being done in the name of global literacy, social justice, and resistance in a political climate where new filters on knowledge may seek to dismantle public education and affiliated social institutions by limiting critical perspectives in students’ educational experience.

Research articles, essays, and policy briefs might address questions or ideas such as:

  • the ways schools and communities are implementing strategies that recognize and respond to conditions that contribute to (or address) education inequity
  • the methods educators are taking to actualize and maintain strong social justice stances in and out of the classroom
  • the approaches educators, students, and communities are taking to organize as participants in the growing movement to resist political agendas
  • the individual or local pedagogic practices and wide-scale reforms being implemented to ensure student access to all knowledge

These questions suggest topic areas but are not exhaustive. We encourage submissions not only from scholars and researchers but also from students, teachers, and community members.

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words, including all references.

We seek previously unpublished thematic essays or empirical research. For full instructions, please visit: http://www.kdp.org/publications/theeducationalforum/authorguidelines.php

Submission deadline: November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/utef

Please include the code “823” at the beginning of your manuscript title.

For more information, please contact the issue co-editors:

Dr. Alan Amtzis (amtzis@tcnj.edu),

Dr. Tabitha Dell’Angelo (dellange@tcnj.edu), or Dr. Ryan Flessner (rflessne@butler.edu).

 

CARL 2018: The Academic Library in Times of Change

April 13-15, 2018

Pullman San Francisco Bay Hotel, Redwood City, California

California Academic & Research Libraries

Submission Form now Open!

Change is an inevitable and can be a welcome part of our jobs. In this ever-changing landscape, libraries are feeling pressure to provide solutions to many and various challenges: shifts in access to our resources, “evolving” ideas of credibility and authority, increasing threats to our patrons’ civil liberties, a movement to “all-things-digital”, staff/library reorganization, and more. How can libraries rise to the challenges of engaging our students and colleagues, advocating for our communities, and protecting our democracy? The CARL 2018 Conference builds upon the CARL 2016 Conference, “What we talk about when we talk about value…” by asking: How will we, as libraries, navigate change, reassert and use our core values to ground our everyday work, strengthen our advocacy, and buoy our hopes in times of uncertainty?

From a March 2017 article in American Libraries, trends to watch include: entrepreneurship, civic engagement and innovation, school libraries as global educators, sustainability, virtual reality, welcoming communities, accessibility, academic tech focus, and 21st century ethics. What do these trends look like on a more local level, and how can we translate them into the work we do on a day-to-day basis?

Sessions will include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

The Library Bill of Rights and the core values of librarianship; issues of equal access, diversity, and inclusion; concerns with intellectual freedom, privacy, and censorship

  • Misinformation, disinformation, and educating users
  • New ways of understanding the user experience to shape library services and programs
  • Open access, OER, scholarly communication, and copyright challenges
  • Resource sharing, consortial practices, shared collections, and discovery systems
  • Changing roles of librarians, and the larger changes in the profession
  • Innovations in acquisitions and technical services: Cataloging, RDA implementation, electronics rights management, demand-driven acquisition, eBooks, and big data/library metrics
  • Collaborative partnerships on- and off-campus

Successful proposals should demonstrate fearless risk-taking, quirky approaches to the same old problems, and down-right insanity when it comes to embracing change.

We will accept proposals on your research or practice related to the conference theme for the following session types:

  • Preconference Sessions: These 4-hour workshop sessions will provide a research framework for practical activities that engage participants around a topic. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Research into Practice Sessions: These sessions will present original research around the conference theme in a 60-minute session. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Engaging in Practice Sessions: This presentation is a 60-minute session that is structured to include audience participation in the form of engaging discussion questions or activities, and have a practical take-away for the attendees. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Panel Presentations: These sessions bring together 2-5 presenters into a cohesive conversation intended to engage audience members in a 60-minute session. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Poster Sessions: This sessions will be posters on a topic related to the conference theme. The due date for these proposals will be January 15, 2018.
  • Round Table Discussions: These sessions will offer conversation on a current topic in libraries, in a casual, round table setting. The due date for these proposals will be January 15, 2018.

Fine Print

All presenters must register and pay for the conference.  All presenters, regardless of session type, will be asked to submit a paper and/or summary of their session to the proceedings.

Important Dates

 July 19, 2017 – Submission Form Open

Sept. 1, 2017 – Registration Opens

Oct. 1, 2017 – Proposals Due for Pre-Conference, Research into Practice, Engaging in Practice and Panels

Nov. 1, 2017 – Selections Announced

Jan. 15, 2018 – Proposals Due for Posters and Round Table Discussions

Feb. 1, 2018 – Final Program Announced

March 2, 2018 – Early Bird Registration Ends

If you have any questions about the conference, please contact the conference planning team.

Conference Planning Team

Allison Carr, Chair, Conference Planning Team
Lee Adams, Conference Planning Team
Joseph Aubele, Conference Planning Team
Talitha Matlin, Conference Planning Team

18th Distance Library Services Conference

Are you a new librarian? Are you working with distance/online/hybrid students
and faculty as part of your first professional library job?

Then please consider working with us on a panel proposal for the 18th Distance
Library Services Conference.

The panel will discuss how new (less than 5 years) librarians are grappling
with distance librarianship. Especially if this is a role new to your library.
How does your job allow for you to take on a leadership role with respect to
implementing/creating a service philosophy or plan for distance patrons? What
have been some of your successes and failures, and how have you learned from
them?

If you are interested in being part of this panel please let us know by
emailing chillman@sjfc.edu by end of business Sep. 13th. We will follow up
with you before final submission of panel proposal.

Thank you for considering,
Christina Hillman, St. John Fisher College
Mia Breitkopf, SUNY Brockport

Journal of Formative Design in Learning

An official journal of the Association for Educational Communications & Technology

Presents original papers that inform the study and practice of education and training

Bridges theory and practice, discussing new developments and their impact on the practice of education and training

Fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process

Journal of Formative Design in Learning bridges the gap between theory and practice by providing reflective practitioners (designers, teachers, instructors, researchers, and others) in teaching and learning with a single source of scholarly papers that discuss new developments and the impact of this new knowledge on the field. The journal publishes original papers on research-based design and development with a focus on applied research, including evaluation reports, action research, case studies, and lessons learned that inform improvement in instruction, and design and development approaches. While the main audience is practitioners, all articles are grounded in established research and theory. The journal encourages and nurtures the development of reflective practitioners of the learning sciences and serves to update and redefine the concept of learning. The journal fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process, and articles inform the study and practice of education and training. The journal provides opportunities not only to established academics and practitioners, but also to junior faculty and emerging scholars. A formative peer-review process is specifically designed to help less experienced authors understand the submission, review, and publication processes of this peer-reviewed academic journal.

For more information about submissions go to http://www.editorialmanager.com/JFDL/default.aspx

Methods for Analyzing and Leveraging Online Learning Data

Call for Chapters

Please Visit: https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2515 

Hello, all:

I am editing a book titled “Methods for Analyzing and Leveraging Online Learning Data.”  I am interested in data from MOOCs, LMSes, online training platforms, mobile learning platforms, education-applied social media platforms, and so on.

https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/2515

Would any of you have chapter proposals or possible draft works?  Finalized chapters would be due Nov. 30, 2017.

Sincerely,

Dr. Shalin Hai-Jew

Kansas State University

 

TechTrends special issue on current innovative research methodology in the instructional design and technology field

The Research and Theory Division of AECT is sponsoring a special issue of TechTrends related to current innovative research methodology in the instructional design and technology field. We welcome proposals in which researchers are rigorously using innovative methods of data collection and analysis as part of an investigation that helps further advance knowledge on the field.

Special Issue Co – Editors

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.
University of Tampa
eromerohall@ut.edu

E-ling Hsiao, Ph.D.
Valdosta State University
ehsiao@valdosta.edu

Fei Gao, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
gaof@bgsu.edu

Submissions should align with the RTD mission to promote the development and advancement of theory; promotes, presents, and disseminates research and scholarship that encompasses multiple perspectives; advocates the study of social and cultural issues in the field; supports, fosters, and mentors emerging scholars. The division provides a professional community for AECT members with an interest in research and theory. The following is a non-exhaustive list of possible innovative methods of data collection and analysis:

– Educational data mining
– Learning analytics
– Social network analysis
– Advanced statistical modeling
– Network anthropology
– Eye tracking
– EEG
– fMRI
– Other physiological measures
– Integrative approaches to ‘mixing’ qualitative research
– Netnography
– Person-centered analyses
– Interactional ethnography
– Rhizoanalysis
– Photovoice
– Art-based data analyses
– Appreciative inquiry
– Concept mapping research
– Visual analysis
– And other innovative research methodologies

Expected publication date: September 2018

Submission Information
Articles should follow the writing style guidelines for Tech Trends. Submissions should be 4000-­-5000 words in length (10 ­-15 pages) and abstracts should not exceed 150 words. Use APA formatting throughout.

Please upload a PDF file with your name, institution, and email address as well as a brief overview (approx. 500 words) of the proposed article using the following link: http://tiny.cc/TechTrendsRTDSpecialIssue for initial review. If accepted for review, you will be directed to a Tech Trends portal for this special issue where you will submit your full article per the schedule below.

We kindly ask authors to also serve as reviewers for the submissions. Reviewers will also be requested from the overall AECT RTD membership. Thank you.

Important Dates
• August 7, 2017 – Call for Proposals posted
• September 15, 2017 – Proposals due: http://tiny.cc/TechTrendsRTDSpecialIssue
• October 16, 2017 – Notify accepted proposals
• January 29, 2018 – Full submissions due AND start peer review process
• March 16, 2018 – Reviews due
• April 27, 2018 – Notify authors of review decisions
• June 1, 2018 – Final and reviewed papers due

Best regards,

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.
RTD President

Assistant Professor
College of Social Science, Mathematics, and Education
The University of Tampa