Category Archives: Gender Studies

University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries Grants to use collections

The Friends of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries is pleased to offer several one month residential grants intended to offset expenses for out-of-town scholars wishing to more deeply utilize the rich resources held by the UW-Madison General Library System.

The deadline for application is March 1, 2018.

For more information, visit, call 608-265-2505, or<>.

Programs for women and girls: A special section of Women In Libraries

Does you library offer programs that are specifically designed for women and/or girls. Women In Libraries ( published by ALA’s Feminist Task Force is looking for information about successful programming that your library has presented that was geared specifically for, or greatly benefitted, women and girls.

These can be special story hours of affinity programs, finance for women, craft circles or Feminist Art projects, celebrations or discussions around the Women’s March, or discussion and speakers about the #MeToo movement, among other ideas. We are interested in programs from all kinds of libraries: public, school, academic and, special libraries.

Women in Libraries wants to share the news about programs that benefit or are of interest to women and girls in our issue in early February. Please send an up to one page write-up about your program: what you did, who attended, any comments from patrons, or other information that you would like others to know about. This is a good time for us to raise awareness of the things that we do in libraries to support women in a million ways. It is time to share your successful ventures so we can applaud you and others can find ideas for new initiatives. Send articles to Dr. Dolores Fidishun, Editor, Women in Libraries at by Feb. 1, 2018.

We hope to hear from you! 


Gender & Sexuality Writing Collective

The 25th Annual Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies
Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference
March 2, 2018 University of Rochester Rochester, NY

The Susan B. Anthony Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Rochester will hold a one-day writing collective on March 2, 2018. The writing collective will provide a lively platform for graduate students to workshop a paper with fellow graduate students and faculty from multiple institutions. The aim of the collective is to create an intimate space for emerging scholars of gender and sexuality to share their work with a focus on preparing the paper for publication. This event is intended as an opportunity for graduate students to consider issues pertaining to gender, sexuality, race, class, and disability. Participants will engage with one another in interdisciplinary discussions led by established scholars in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, whose experience and outstanding research in their respective fields will benefit and help shape the papers.

We welcome emerging scholars to join us in this one-day program of events that includes a full day of workshops and a panel discussion.

Breakfast and lunch will be provided. To learn more about the Susan B. Anthony Center and the Susan B. Anthony Interdisciplinary Conference, please visit:

Please submit a paper (6,000-10,000 words, including your name, broader research interest, and email address) along with a brief biographical statement in Word or PDF format by December 31, 2017, to the graduate organizing committee at

You will receive the committee’s decision by January 31, 2018.

Kind Regards,

The Susan B. Anthony Interdisciplinary Graduate Conference Planning Committee
The Susan B. Anthony Institute
The University of Rochester

Neglected Newberys: A Critical Reassessment at the Centennial

Volume editors: Sara L. Schwebel and Jocelyn Van Tuyl

In anticipation of the one hundredth anniversary of the American Library Association’s Newbery Medal (1922-2022), submissions are welcomed for a volume devoted to critically-neglected Newbery Award-winners.

About the Volume

Since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922, Newbery novels have had an outsized influence on American children’s literature, figuring perennially on publisher’s lists, on library and bookstore shelves, and in K-12 school curricula. As such, they offer a compelling window into the history of U.S. children’s literature and publishing as well as changing societal attitudes about what books are “best” for American children. Nevertheless, many Newbery Award winners—even the most popular and frequently taught titles—have attracted scant critical attention.

This volume offers a critically- and historically-grounded analysis of representative Newbery Medal books and interrogates the disjunction between the books’ omnipresence and influence, on the one hand, and the critical silence surrounding them, on the other.

The editors seek at least one previously unpublished essay per decade (1920s-2010s), with each essay to focus primarily on a single Newbery Medal (not Newbery Honor) title for which little or no literary scholarship exists. We welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

We specifically seek a diversity of Newbery authors, genres, themes, and book settings, but also investigations of how diversity is treated or, especially for earlier works, silenced in the texts.

Avenues for exploration include: neglected categories and sub-genres (horse books, maritime adventure stories, regional literature, retold folktales, one-hit wonders for children by well-known authors); reception and book history (alterations of text to avoid offensive language and imagery, both immediately after the Medal and decades later); critical readings of problematic texts; Newbery winners and their archives; hypotheses regarding critical neglect: the rise of Children’s Literature as an academic field long after the Medal’s inception; the disjunction between the Newbery’s historical whiteness and heteronormativity and current developments in literary criticism; a possible disconnect between librarians who award the medal, K-12 teachers who recommend the books, and university professors who are rewarded for publishing literary criticism.

Submission Information

E-mail the editors ( and for access to the spreadsheet of books on which we are soliciting contributions, contributor resources, and additional specifications to ensure continuity throughout the volume.


The deadline for initial proposals of approximately 500 words is April 1, 2018.

We anticipate requesting completed essays of 6000-7000 words by early 2019 (subject to the publisher’s requirements).

Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities

While the debates in and around the digital humanities continue–what they are, why they are, what they contribute to humanities scholarship–those working in the field know the truly transformative work being done both nationally and internationally. This proposed collection of essays, Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities, will build on the critical work has been done to date to showcase DH scholarship, while expanding the focus to provide a broadly international perspective. To this end, we especially encourage scholars working outside the U.S. to consider submitting a proposal. We have an expression of interest in this project from Routledge.


We are looking for essays that not only describe long-term projects/large-impact projects but those that also place the work within a cultural context and what is happening in terms of DH. Finally, proposed essays should be forward looking, addressing the question(s): how does this work indicate where DH is going/where it should be going/where it could be going? Essays may take the form of case studies, if appropriate. A 300-word abstract and one-page c.v. should be submitted by January 22, 2018 to Marta Deyrup <> and Mary Balkun <>.



2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15:



How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at

Special Issue: Women & Language- Transcending the Acronym: Genders, Sexes, Sexualities, and Gender Identities Beyond “LGBT”

Guest Editor: Leland G. Spencer, Miami University

Article Deadline: January 31, 2018

Critical studies of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity have many goals, and certainly one includes the effort to trouble, interrogate, and upend binaries, dichotomies, and rigid categories—and the naturalization thereof. Despite these underlying theoretical commitments many of us share, research about sexuality and gender identity often subtly reinscribes many of the categories and even binaries it purports to disavow. The ubiquitous initialism LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender), sometimes extended to become more inclusive by adding a Q for “queer” or “questioning” or an A for “ally” or “asexual,” often obscures as much as it clarifies. For instance, the acronym problematically conflates gender identity and sexuality, leading to dubious conclusions in articles that claim to report results about “LGBT” people but have actually only surveyed cisgender gay and lesbian people. The acronym also leaves out a range of sexualities and gender identities, and the ones it represents overemphasize colonized, Western, and White understandings of sexuality and gender identity.

Thus, this special issue invites articles that explore identities and expressions of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity not typically contained in the acronym, including analyses that interrogate the acronym and its hegemony as such. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • pansexuality,
  • asexuality,
  • skoliosexuality,
  • agender,
  • genderqueer,
  • quare,
  • intersex,
  • two spirit,
  • polyamory,
  • third gender,
  • gender fluidity,
  • and many more.

All types of original research are welcome, including but not limited to: quantitative, qualitative, rhetorical, critical, theoretical, historical, performative, creative/artistic, and autoethnographic. Contributions that consider intersections of various axes of difference are especially encouraged, as are articles that consider non-Western understandings of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity. Articles may have any of the following goals (again, not an exhaustive list):

  • definition and theorization of terms,
  • offering histories and best practices for language use,
  • analysis of experiences of persons at particular social locations,
  • criticism of portrayals or representations in media,
  • theoretically informed analysis of personal experiences,
  • social movement criticism,
  • or examination of the influence of social institutions such as education, statist violence, religion, workplaces and the economy, or healthcare practices.

Articles should follow the general guidelines for manuscripts to be submitted to Women & Language but should be submitted by email to Dr. Leland G. Spencer, Inquiries about the issue may be sent to the same email address.

Article deadline: January 31, 2018 

A PDF version of this call may be downloaded at:

Bi Women Quarterly

*Dear Women’s Studies Folks,*

*I’m the editor of /Bi Women Quarterly, /a VERY grassroots quarterly

*You can read current and about 9 years of back issues at, and older issues of this 35-year-old project are
available in digitized format at Harvard’s Schlesinger Library.*

_*Spring 2018: Chosen Family*_

_**_Chosen families are groups of people who deliberately choose to play
significant roles in each other’s lives. Who makes up your chosen
family? How did you come to find each other? What does your chosen
family mean to you and your bi+ identity?
*Submissions for this is are due by February 1.

*Submission guidelines can be found here

*~Robyn Ochs

Unruly Catholic Women Volume 4

Call for Submissions (extended): Third- and Fourth-Wave Catholic Women Writers: The Future of Unruly Women in the Catholic Church.  Jeana DelRosso, Leigh Eicke, and Ana Kothe seek contributions for the fourth volume in their Unruly Catholic Women series.  In this volume, we seek creative pieces by third- and fourth-wave feminists on Roman Catholicism, with an eye to the future of the Catholic Church.  Please submit autobiographical stories, fictional pieces, prose, or poems AND by 17 December 2017, for consideration.  All submissions must be in English.

Dr. Jeana DelRosso
Professor of English and Women’s Studies
Director of the Morrissy Honors Program
Notre Dame of Maryland University
4701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD  21210

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided


The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT ( by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration