Category Archives: Information Science

eLearning Africa

eLearning Africa is the key networking event for ICT supported education, training and skills development in Africa. Bringing together high-level policy makers, decision makers and practitioners from education, business and government, eLearning Africa 2018 will take place from 26 – 28 September 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda. Call for Proposal deadline is January 30, 2018.

TechTrends special issue on learning technologies and effect on teaching and learning process

Special issue of TechTrends related to current trends, issues, and research involving emerging learning technologies and their effects on the teaching and learning process. Both research and practitioner proposals are welcome, however, all submissions should include collected data. Additional information can be found in the Call for Chapters. Deadline is January 15, 2018.

Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education (SITE)

Washington, DC

March 26-30, 2018

Final Call for Papers due: January 22, 2018

For more information go to: http://site.aace.org/conf/

SITE 2018 in Washington, DC, March 26-30, is the 29th annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education. This society represents individual teacher educators and affiliated organizations of teacher educators in all disciplines, who are interested in the creation and dissemination of knowledge about the use of information technology in teacher education and faculty/staff development. SITE is a society of the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

SITE promotes the development and dissemination of theoretical knowledge, conceptual research, and professional practice knowledge through conferences, books, projects, and the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education (JTATE).

Learning analytics and the academic library: Critical questions about real and possible futures, Special issue of Library Trends

Special issue information
Journal:
Title:
Learning analytics and the academic library: Critical questions about real and possible futures
Abstract submission deadline:
April 1, 2018
Publication date:
March, 2019
Nature and scope of this issue
Learning analytics is the “measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data about learners and their contexts, for purposes of understanding and optimizing learning and the environments in which it occurs.”[1] If the academic library is the “most important observation post” for understanding how students learn, then it follows that libraries in colleges and universities should be a primary focus of data mining and analysis initiatives in higher education.[2] Integration of library data in learning analytics is fledgling at best, but there are growing calls for such activity to increase, especially to enhance a library’s ability to prove their resource expenditures and demonstrate alignment with wider institutional goals (e.g., improve learning outcomes, decrease costs, etc.).[3]
The efficacy of learning analytics is premised on an institution’s ability to identify, aggregate, and manage a wide variety and increasingly large volume of data about students, much of which needs to be identifiable in order to develop personalized, just-in-time learning interventions. So, in the fashion of other Big Data initiatives, institutions are beginning to dredge their information systems for student behaviors, personal information, and communications, all of which hold potential to reveal how students learn and uncover structural impediments to learning.
It is enticing to assume good things about library participation in learning analytics. The profession wants to provide just the right information at just the right time, and professional librarians want that information to aid students as they develop personally, academically, and professionally. Moreover, the profession seeks to further cement its position as a key player in the educational experience, and learning analytics may enable librarians to make stronger claims about their pivotal role once they gain access to new sources of data and the metrics that come from data analysis. But, like all technologies, learning analytics are not neutral; they are embedded with and driven by political agendas, which may not be congruent with—or necessarily aware of—extant values and ethical positions, such as those espoused by academic librarians and users of their libraries.[4] Consequentially, scholars and practitioners need to take a critical approach to the growing role of learning analytics in academic libraries and the wider higher education context in order to better inform conversations concerning the intended and unintended positive and negative outcomes learning analytics can bring about.
This special issue is motivated by Neil Selwyn’s position that the “purposeful pursuit of pessimism” [L1] [JK2] as it relates to educational technologies is constructive and fruitful.[5] In contrast, optimism around emerging technologies—and the denial of critical voices—perpetuates a belief that technological progress is always a good thing. While we often perceive a pessimistic attitude towards technology as destructive or equate it to traditional Luddism, there is actually much to be gained by critically questioning the political agendas driving educational technology design, adoption, and diffusion.
This issue will invite authors to explore and push back against statements that learning analytics will somehow improve academic libraries by addressing questions around political positions and value conflicts inherent to learning analytics, coded in related information systems, and embedded in emerging data infrastructures.
Instructions for submission
The guest editor requests interested parties to submit an abstract of 500 words or less, following APA format for parenthetical and reference list citations, by April 1, 2018. Abstracts should be sent to kmlj@iupui.edu with the subject of “Library Trends: Abstract Submission.”
For full details, see the webpage at Library Trends (https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/call-papers-0)

DT&L Conference

Madison, WI

Aug. 7-9, 2018

For full information go to: https://dtlconference.wisc.edu/call-for-proposals/

We invite you to submit a proposal to present at the 34th annual Distance Teaching & Learning Conference, August 7-9, 2018 in Madison, Wisconsin. We are looking for quality presentations intended for advanced practitioners in distance, online, or blended education and training. We will also consider some basic/foundational proposals geared toward those newer to the field. All proposals should be grounded in evidence-based practice and/or innovative strategies.

Deadline to submit is 4:00 pm (CST) on Tuesday, January 23.

Here are some proposal topics to consider:

ABCs Of DE (Basic)

Accessibility and ADA (section 508) compliance

Alternative credentialing

Augmented/virtual reality

Blended learning designs

Building & supporting learning communities

Distance education leadership/administration

Evaluating online learning

Faculty development

Game-based learning

Immersive learning

Learner engagement strategies

Learner support

Learning analytics and student success

Learning science research to practice

Mastery & competency-based learning

Measuring learning & assessment

Mobile learning

New/emerging technologies

Online teaching strategies

Open resources and content curation

Personalized & adaptive learning

Social learning

Video & multimedia-based learning

All proposals will be peer reviewed and evaluated on these criteria:

Practical methods and techniques that others can use and apply

Clear learning goals and key takeaways

Relevance to the field of distance education and online learning

Depth of knowledge conveyed related to distance teaching, learning, and training

Inclusion of evaluation data and/or established theoretical models

Focus on established or emerging trends, practices, data, and knowledge

Evidence of successful outcomes or lessons learned

 

2018 Joint Spring Conference – User Experience: Where the Library and Patrons Meet

The planning committee of the 2018 KLA/SLA Joint Spring Conference is pleased to announce the call for proposals for mini-sessions and poster presentations is now open.  Built around the theme of User Experience, roughly defined as the measure of your end user’s interaction with your library: its brand, its product, and its services, the committee welcomes submissions from presenters based on this topic and any topics that may apply. A list of these topics includes, but is not limited to:

 

User design

Usability

Website management

Space assessments

Signage

Data collection

Accessibility

Information Architecture

Visual Design

Information Literacy

Leadership/Management

 

Scheduled for April 4 – 6 at General Butler State Resort Park, the Joint Spring Conference is a collaboration between the Academic and Special Library Sections of the Kentucky Library Association and the Kentucky Chapter of the Special Libraries Association.

The deadline to submit abstracts is December 15, 2017. To submit your abstract, please click the following link: https://goo.gl/forms/2GJmmDUVKUMzFBV42. Your abstract should include:

Presenter(s) name

Institution name

Library name

Title of your presentation

Presentation type: Mini-session or Poster

Short (250 word) abstract of your presentation or poster

Mini-sessions will be 50-minute formal presentations by the presenter. Poster presentation submissions are also welcome for display and discussion during our poster reception on Thursday evening.

All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and all submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance thinking about user experiences. All accepted presenters will be required to register for the conference, but may do so at the member rate.

 

Important Dates:

Friday, December 15, 2017 – Submission Deadline
Friday, January 12, 2018 – Acceptance Notification
Friday, March 2, 2018 – Early Bird Registration Deadline
Friday, March 30, 2018 – Registration Deadline

Registration Fees:

 

Full Conference – 

Member 115 / 145

Non-Member 155 / 185

Student 25 / 25

One Day – 

Member 80 / 100

Non-Member 105 / 125

Student 25 / 25


*Members include those individuals who are members of any of the following: KLA – Academic Library Section, KLA – Special Library Section, SLA – Kentucky Chapter

*Conference registration will open soon. Be on the lookout for that upcoming announcement!

 

On behalf of the planning committee, we thank you for your interest in the conference and look forward to your submissions

 

 

 

 

 

 

Theory, Method, and Practice in Library Research

2018 Library Research Round Table Forum

ALA Annual Conference, New Orleans, June 21-26, 2018

The Library Research Round Table (LRRT) is accepting paper submissions for the LRRT Research Forum at the 2018 American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in New Orleans. The LRRT Research Forum will feature 15-minute presentations of library and information science (LIS) research followed by discussion. Proposals are due Friday, January 12, 2018.  Notification of acceptance will be made on Friday, February 16, 2018.

DESCRIPTION OF THE SESSION

This session will present three peer-reviewed papers describing research with the potential to make significant contributions to the field of library and information science (LIS). The three papers will selected as examples of research excellence, with a focus on work exemplifying strong use of theory, clear and well-organized research design, and appropriate data gathering and analysis methods.

Submissions emphasizing the problems, theories, methodologies, or significance of research findings for LIS are welcome. Topics can include information access, user behavior, electronic services, service effectiveness, emerging technologies, organizational structure, and personnel. All researchers, including practitioners from all types of libraries and other organizations, LIS faculty, graduate students, and other interested individuals are encouraged to submit proposals. Both members and nonmembers of LRRT are welcome.

The selection committee will use a blind review process to select three papers. Authors will be required to present their papers in person at the forum and to register for the conference. Criteria for selection include:

  1. Significance of the research problem to LIS research and practice.
  2. Quality and creativity of the methodology/methods/research design.
  3. Clarity of the connection to existing LIS research.

Please note that research accepted for publication by January 31, 2018 cannot be considered.

Each submission must consist of no more than two pages. On the first page, list the author names, titles, institutional affiliations, and contact information, including mailing addresses and email addresses.

The second page must NOT show your name or any personally identifying information. Instead, it must include:

  1. The paper title.
  2. A 500-word abstract of the research project, including: 1) a problem statement and significance, 2) project objectives, 3) methods/methodology, and 4) conclusions (or tentative conclusions for work in progress).
  3. A brief statement saying if the research is complete or ongoing and listing the project beginning and end dates.

Send submissions via email to:

Jennifer Sweeney

LRRT Chair

Lecturer, SJSU

Program Evaluation & Planning

Jksweeney572@gmail.com

 

2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

WORK: GSISC 18

 

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

2018 NMC Summer Conference

The Global EdTech Forum for Higher Education, Museums, Libaries and Schools

June 12-14, 2018

Denver, CO

For more information go to: https://www.nmc.org/nmc-event/2018-nmc-summer-conference/

The NMC Summer Conference (#NMC18) is a one-of-a-kind event, attracting highly skilled education professionals interested in the integration of emerging technologies and innovative approaches into teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Join us as we celebrate 25 years of sparking innovation, learning, and creativity!

Do you work every day to foster authentic learning? To improve the teaching profession? To spur innovation in your environment? The annual NMC Summer Conference is an ideal opportunity to share your work with participants who are just as passionate about driving real change in education and view edtech as an enabler. You have ideas and projects worthy of sharing, and we want to help you get them in front of people who will benefit from your vision — and help build upon it. Join us June 12-14 in Denver, Colorado and answer the call for proposals.

So, what’s it all about? Learn about the session tracks and types that will help define your proposal.

Timelines

The Call for Proposals will open Monday, November 27, 2017

The Call for Proposals will close on Sunday, February 4, 2018.

Presenters will be notified in mid-March 2018.

 

ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2018 (JCDL 2018)

The ACM/IEEE Joint Conference on Digital Libraries in 2018 (JCDL 2018: https://2018.jcdl.org/) will be held in conjunction with UNT Open Access Symposium 2018 (https://openaccess.unt.edu/symposium/2018) on June 3 – 6, 2018 in Fort Worth, Texas, the rustic and artistic threshold into the American West. JCDL welcomes interesting submissions ranging across theories, systems, services, and applications. We invite those managing, operating, developing, curating, evaluating, or utilizing digital libraries broadly defined, covering academic or public institutions, including archives, museums, and social networks. We seek involvement of those in iSchools, as well as working in computer or information or social sciences and technologies. Multiple tracks and sessions will ensure tailoring to researchers, practitioners, and diverse communities including data science/analytics, data curation/stewardship, information retrieval, human-computer interaction, hypertext (and Web/network scie!
nce), multimedia, publishing, preservation, digital humanities, machine learning/AI, heritage/culture, health/medicine, policy, law, and privacy/intellectual property.

General Instructions on submissions of full papers, short papers, posters and demonstrations, doctoral consortium, tutorials, workshops, and panels can be found at https://2018.jcdl.org/general_instructions. Below are the submission deadlines:

• Jan. 15, 2018 – Tutorial and workshop proposal submissions
• Jan. 15, 2018 – Full paper and short paper submissions
• Jan. 29, 2018 – Panel, poster and demonstration submissions
• Feb. 1, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for tutorials and workshops
• Mar. 8, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for full papers, short papers, panels, posters, and demonstrations
• Mar. 25, 2018 – Doctoral Consortium abstract submissions
• Apr. 5, 2018 – Notification of acceptance for Doctoral Consortium
• Apr. 15, 2018 – Final camera-ready deadline for full papers, short papers, panels, posters, and demonstrations

Please email jcdl2018@googlegroups.com if you have any questions.​