Category Archives: Libraries

LITA at ALA Annual 2018

The program submission deadline has been extended to:

Tuesday September 5, 2017

Submit Your Program ideas for the 2018 ALA Annual Conference 

New Orleans LA, June 21-26, 2018

The LITA Program Planning Committee (PPC) is now encouraging the submission of innovative and creative proposals for the 2018 Annual American Library Association Conference. We’re looking for 60 minute conference presentations. The focus should be on technology in libraries, whether that’s use of, new ideas for, trends in, or interesting/innovative projects being explored – it’s all for you to propose. Programs should be of interest to all library/information agency types, that inspire technological change and adoption, or/and generally go above and beyond the everyday.

  • Submission Deadline: September 5, 2017
  • Final Decisions: September 29, 2017
  • Schedule of Sessions Announced: November 8, 2017

For the first time, proposals will be accepted via one submission site for all ALA Divisions, RoundTables, Committees and Offices. This link to the submission site will redirect to the ALA log-in page. All submitters are required to have an ALA profile, but are not required to be ALA members.

Help and details on making a successful submission are on the LITA Forms web site.

We regularly receive many more proposals than we can program into the slots available to LITA at the ALA Annual Conference. These great ideas and programs all come from contributions like yours. Submissions are open to anyone, regardless of ALA membership status. We welcome proposals from anyone who feels they have something to offer regarding library technology. We look forward to hearing the great ideas you will share with us this year.

Questions or Comments?

Contact LITA at (312) 280-4268 or Mark Beatty, mbeatty@ala.org

Nineteenth International Conference on Grey Literature ‘Public Awareness and Access to Grey Literature’

Rome, Italy on 23-24 October 2017

The GL19 Call for Posters is now open. Participants who seek to present a poster are invited to submit an English abstract between 300-350 words. The abstract should describe the project and/or related information product or service. The conference venue is only able to accommodate a limited number of digital and physical posters. Timely registration is your guarantee of placement on the conference program as well as an opportunity to win the Poster Prize 2017 http://www.textrelease.com/gl19callforposters.html

GreyNet International
Grey Literature Network Service

Javastraat 194-HS

1095 CP Amsterdam

Netherlands

T/F +31-(0) 20 331 2420

Email: info@greynet.org

Url: http://www.greynet.org


Dedicated to Research, Publication, Open Access, Education, and Public Awareness to Grey Literature

ETTLIS2018: 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services

ETTLIS2018: 2018 IEEE International Symposium on  Emerging Trends and Technologies in Libraries and Information Services

Bennett University
Noida, India, February 21-23, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

The ETTLIS 2018 intends to bridge the gap between different areas of library and information services, digital information management, science and technology. This platform will address a large number of themes and issues. The symposium will feature original research and working papers, case studies on design and implementation of digital information systems, as well as emerging trends and technologies in library and information services through paper presentation, demonstrations, workshops and practitioner presentations.

https://easychair.org/cfp/ettlis2018

The Journal of Archival Organization 

The Journal of Archival Organization is an international, peer-reviewed journal encompassing all aspects of the arrangement, description, and provision of access to all forms of archival materials.

JAO addresses a broad range of issues of interest to the profession including archival management and staffing, archival technologies, the arrangement and description of records collection, collection growth and access, diversity and gender, grant-funding, and institutional support. Articles addressing academic, public and special/corporate libraries, museums and governmental agencies are all welcome.

How to submit:

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to Marta Deyrup  martadeyrup@gmail.com

The separate abstract page should be single-spaced to include a 100-word abstract, list of keywords for indexing purposes, and author(s) footnote (name, title, affiliation, address, and email address), with identification of the corresponding author.

References, citations, and general style of manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the APA Publication Manual, 6th ed. Cite in the text by author and date (Smith, 1983) and include an alphabetical list of references at the end of the article.

For more information about the Journal of Archival Organization, please visit the journal’s webpage: www.tandfonline.com/WJAO

 

Learning beyond the Classroom: Engaging Students in Information Literacy through Co-Curricular Activities

We would like to invite chapter proposals for an ACRL publication: Learning beyond the Classroom: Engaging Students in Information Literacy through Co-Curricular Activities

Overview:

There are many opportunities outside of the classroom to introduce information literacy concepts to students by contextualizing the concepts through co-curricular activities.  This book will share many examples and provide ideas for teaching information literacy through academic events.  Learning beyond the Classroom will be a compilation of chapters focused on four themes: instructional design of co-curricular activities (e.g. experiential learning, service learning, etc.), examples of co-curricular activities, tools for developing and managing the activities, and strategies for assessing the student experience.

Section topics and examples:

Section I: Designing Co-Curricular Learning Experiences

Experiential learning and information literacy

 Section II: Practicing Information Literacy in Co-Curricular Activities

Teaching “Information has Value” through zine-making (The Zine Lab Initiative)

Collaborating with Career Services to teach students “Searching as Strategic Exploration”

Section III: Executing Co-Curricular Activities

Application of tools and techniques for managing activities

Involvement of students as event leaders

Section IV: Assessing Learning and Impact

Reflection as an effective way for students to engage in learning

Results from a Pre- and Post-tests on the effectiveness of an academic event

Chapters will be approximately 3000-5000 words submitted as a .doc file by February 15, 2018.

Proposal submissions:

Please send an abstract to learningbeyondclassroom.il@gmail.com with the following information:

  • Name(s) and affiliated institution
  • Proposed chapter title
  • 250- 500-word summary of proposed chapter
  • Current CV

All submissions must be unpublished original work, and not currently under review by other publications. 

Deadline: All proposals should be submitted by October 5, 2017.

Notifications: Contributors will be notified of acceptance by December 8, 2017.

If you have any questions about the book or proposals, please contact Silvia Vong and Manda Vrkljan at learningbeyondclassroom.il@gmail.com.

E-Learn

October 17-20, 2017

Vancouver, British Columbia

Second call for papers due August 22, 2017

For more information go to:  https://ucs.psu.edu/zimbra/public/launchNewWindow.jsp?skin=beach&localeId=en_US&full=1&childId=27

To submit a proposal go to: https://conf.aace.org/elearn/submission/

ER&L (Electronic Resources and Libraries) Workshops 2018

ER&L is currently seeking workshop proposals and ER&L 101 courses for the 2018 conference, to be held March 4-7, 2018 in Austin, Texas.
What is an ER&L Workshop?
A workshop is a 4-hour intensive course designed to take the attendee into subject matter with a knowledgeable instructor. Workshops are typically interactive with instruction spanning exercises and practical applications to supplement the instruction. Workshops will be held 1-5 pm on Sunday, April 2nd and Wednesday, April 5th.
NEW FOR 2018: ER&L 101
Along with workshops, ER&L is also looking for half-day courses to help introduce an attendee to a foundational area of librarianship (such as licensing, e-book management, troubleshooting) or an emerging but important topic starting at an introductory level. These courses would not require background knowledge of the topic and would be appropriate for a practitioner new to e-resources or as an introduction to a new topic. These courses will be held 1-5 pm Sunday, March 4th and will be part of a larger set of 101 sessions throughout the ER&L conference.
Submission Deadline: Friday, August 18, 2017
Workshop proposals may be submitted via ProposalSpace at https://proposalspace.com/calls/d/782
Further information is available online at https://www.electroniclibrarian.org/2018-call-for-workshops/
Please direct any questions to ER&L staff at hello@electroniclibrarian.org.

ALA Video Round Table Program Committee (VRT), ALA New Orleans 2018

Thinking about attending the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans (June 21-26, 2018)?

Have you worked on any projects or activities involving film or video at your institution?

The ALA Video Round Table Program Committee (VRT) would like to encourage you to submit program proposals for one-hour informational sessions at ALA Annual on just about anything related to video and libraries! Please note that you will not be submitting directly to the VRT Program Committee but through the ALA Program Proposal Submission Site (login or create a new account to enter).

Proposals are due in just a few weeks so get them in soon – the deadline is August 25, 2017!

Instructions for submitting your proposal are available online.

Sample ideas include but are not limited to:

  • Are you finding new ways to promote films to your community?
  • Are you doing anything interesting in curating your film collections?
  • Have you made library promotional videos?
  • Have you created video tutorials?
  • Are you using film clips (or gifs) in instruction?
  • Have you created a media center for your patrons?
  • Do you work with your patrons in video creation?
  • Are you involved with film or video preservation?
  • Have you offered special film programming/events at your library?

ALA is especially looking for program ideas that encourage collaboration and support diversity and submissions from all types of libraries (public, school, academic, special) are welcome.   

Suffrage Supporters of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1900-1920

Beginning in June 2015, we at Women and Social Movements in the United States launched a crowdsourcing project that will result in the online publication of the “Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States.”  When completed in 2020 this resource will include about 2,500 biographical sketches of women supporters of woman suffrage campaigns in the first two decades of the twentieth century.

The Online Dictionary will include three distinct groups of woman suffragists: about 350 supporters of the militant suffrage group, the National Woman’s Party, including women who picketed in 1917-1919 in Washington, D.C., New York and Boston to protest the slowness with which the administration of President Woodrow Wilson embraced the woman suffrage cause; about 100 Black women suffragists whose writings have been collected and published on the website; finally, more than 2,000 mainstream suffrage supporters affiliated with the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), whose names are listed in state reports printed in volume 6 of the History of Woman Suffrage (1922).

NAWSA supporters are recorded in reports covering state-level suffrage activism between 1900 and 1920. Taking advantage of the state residence information in these reports, we have organized this part of the work by state and are seeking historians and history students interested in researching and writing 500-word biographical sketches of suffrage supporters in their state.  We have been particularly interested in finding faculty who might assign biographical sketches to their students as part of courses they are teaching.  In the first phase of our work we have received excellent sketches written by high school, community college, and four-year college students, working under the direction of their history faculty.  We also have had volunteers who are graduate students or independent historians, who have written one or two biographical sketches.  On the current NAWSA portion of the project, we are also seeking historians, librarians, or museum or historical society staff who would be interested in serving as state coordinators, taking responsibility to recruit additional volunteers and copyedit completed biographical sketches of suffrage supporters in their state.  As of this writing (July 2016), we still need state coordinators for 17 states.  Follow this link for a listing of those states.

To facilitate review the state reports on which the NAWSA activists crowdsourcing is based, we have posted a .pdf version of The History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 6, 1900-1920 on this site. Click here to view the volume. For access to a research guide for volunteers preparing bio sketches, click here. To view a sample biographical sketch to use as a template, click here. This sample includes further suggestions for sketch writers.

If you are in a position to join in one of these capacities, please contact project director, Tom Dublin at tdublin@binghamton.edu.  We need volunteers who can write biographical sketches between 2016 and 2018 in order to post the sketches on the website in 2019 and 2020, in time for the centennial of the passage of the nineteenth amendment which assured all women in the United States the right to vote.  We will follow up this project description with periodic updates tracking the progress of our work.  Please join us in this important work and let others know about this prospect.

 

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II

Call for abstracts for! The deadline is Aug 1 – and we’re looking forward to seeing
your ideas! For more information, contact Ann Braithwaite,
abraithwaite@upei.ca and/or Catherine Orr, orrc@beloit.edu

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies – Volume II

(under contract with Routledge/Taylor and Francis)

Call for Chapter Proposals – August 1, 2017

Catherine M. Orr and Ann Braithwaite, Editors

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II (RWGS II) is an anthology that
addresses the complexities and inherent paradoxes of the expansive
knowledge project known as Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) for audiences
both inside and adjacent to the field. RWGS II continues the work of Rethinking
Women’s and Gender Studies (Routledge 2012)
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>
but
seeks to complement rather than merely update it. It is both the same, in
that it explores key terms and common narratives, and different, in that it
stretches its scope of exploration vis-à-vis new terms that now circulate
both in WGS and other interdisciplinary knowledge projects. Thus, our focus
in this new volume is more future oriented in that we want authors to think
about what terms are crossing field boundaries and where those
boundary-crossings can take us.*

List of Possible Terms Include (but are not limited to): Nation,
Decoloniality, Race, Anti/Blackness, Inclusion, Consent, Women of Color,
Whiteness, Indigeneity, Women, Cis-, Citizenship, Masculinity, Disability,
Diversity, Affect, Social Justice, Non-human animals, Eco-feminism,
Critical, Civic Engagement, Experience/Experiential Learning, Branding,
Inclusive Excellence, The Ph.D., Violence, Expertise, Entrepreneurship

In exploring a term, we ask each contributor contemplate the following
questions:

How are you positioned in relation to the field of WGS? What moves you
to take up this particular term?

How does this term function in WGS–intellectually, institutionally,
administratively, and/or pedagogically?

What are some of the tensions within WGS generated by this term?

How does this term point to, overlap, or contradict other theoretical
languages, approaches, and fields?

How does this term reflect different temporalities (disciplinary
histories, “times,” career clocks, or generations) within or beyond WGS?

What would a reconsideration of this term offer to WGS as a knowledge
project?

Chapter Proposals DUE August 1, 2017:  500-word abstract that addresses
some or all of above questions plus bio or short CV. Send to:
orrc@beloit.edu and abraithwaite@upei.ca

Final Draft of Chapters DUE: January 10, 2018.  6000 words maximum
(including endnotes), Times New Roman, 12-point manuscript text with
one-inch margins.

*More about  RWGS II:

As with RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II focuses on asking how certain terms come to be taken-for-granted in
WGS, exploring both the unacknowledged assumptions and subsequent
unintended consequences of their use. Identifying and interrogating the
functions and effects of these terms continues to reflect our understanding
of WGS as a knowledge project, one that asks questions about how we come to
know something as much as what it is we claim to know.  As such, RWGS
II continues
to interrogate the field through a double(d) lens, insisting that the
languages that circulate in the field constitute both our methods of
analysis and our objects of study.

Using the same organizational approach of constructing critical genealogies
of key terms as in RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II extends that earlier project, now unpacking, exploring, and
accounting for terms that are not necessarily unique to WGS but that are
nevertheless influential in its current understandings and practices.
Think, for instance, of terms that circulate just as much in
interdisciplinary projects adjacent to WGS (e.g., Ethnic Studies,
Indigenous Studies, Disability Studies, Queer Studies, Prison Studies,
Social Justice Studies) as they do in WGS. We think of these terms as sites
of encounter that are characterized just as much by agreement and consensus
as by contestation and conflict as they cross inter/disciplinary
boundaries. Their mobilization in WGS has the potential to excite and
agitate the field imaginary in ways that are both productive and
problematic for the present and future(s) of  WGS.

Likewise, RWGS II aims to further explore the ways in which WGS always
works both within and against the institution within which it is located,
through a variety of terms and narratives that take the university itself
as a site of encounter in need of further interrogation. What happens if
those terms are faced head on, and even embraced by and in the name of WGS?
What productive work of social change, and of critical reflection on the
relationships between identity/knowledge/power, can occur when WGS—uneasily
to be sure—encounters these terms and practices them “otherwise?” Can such
counterintuitive moves illuminate new–as yet unthought–futures of WGS?
Can embracing a politics of engagement (rather than a politics of refusal)
reveal new genealogies and different trajectories for and of this field, in
academia and beyond?