Category Archives: Academic Libraries

ACRL Science and Technology Section Annual Research Forum and Poster sessions

The Research Committee of the ACRL Science and Technology Section is hosting
its Annual Research Forum (Sunday, June 24, 2018) and Poster Session (Sunday,
June 24, 2018) at the 2018 American Library Association Annual Conference in
New Orleans.

The Research Forum and Poster Session provide an excellent opportunity to
share a wide range of research projects relevant to science and technology

Submissions for the paper and poster presentations are selected based on the
quality of the abstract and the demonstration of significant progress toward
completing the research project by June 2018.  Your submission should include:
-brief background information about your project,
-the research question or problem that drove your project,
-the methods used,
-your findings and a brief discussion that includes the impact of your

Your proposal should total no more than 250 words. Because this is a blind
review process, be sure to include your name, institution, phone, and email
addresses of all participants (not part of word count) separate from your
abstract (the form has separate fields for these items).

Please submit your proposal via this form:

Submission Categories:
Research Forum Featured Paper Presentation.  The Featured Paper Presentation
is 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a thoughtful 10-minute
critique from a guest commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to
prepare the paper for publication.  Proposals should reflect research that has
been completed or initiatives that have already been implemented. At a
minimum, significant progress should have been made toward completion or
Research Forum Short Paper Presentations.  Short Papers are 10 minutes in
length and will be followed by a thoughtful 5-minute critique from a guest
commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to prepare the paper for
publication or generate additional ideas that will move the paper forward.
Proposals should reflect research or initiatives that have been completed or
are currently in progress.
Poster Presentations.  Posters should cover research endeavors or practitioner
projects that enhance science and technology librarianship.  Proposals should
provide useful and practical findings, and describe opportunities for
discussion with participants.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: Friday, February 23, 2018.  Submissions
are selected by the STS Research Committee. The Committee adheres to mentoring
principles and a “blind” review process to select proposals. We strongly
encourage you to remove any identifying information in your proposal prior to
submission; otherwise, the STS Research Committee co-chairs will take
responsibility for removing identifying information, which may unintentionally
alter the text of your submission.

Acceptance of proposals reflects a commitment by the author(s) to present at
the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans. Travel support from STS is not
available. Specific logistical details will follow upon acceptance.  Please
submit your proposal via this form:

If you have any questions, please ask the STS Research Committee co-chairs:
Amy Van Epps,
Hannah Gascho Rempel,

Catholic Library World

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World. 

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries. 

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission. 

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented. 

For more information, please visit this website: 

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, 

Failing Forward: Experimentation and Creativity in Libraries

2018 ACRL New England Chapter Annual Conference

Friday, May 4, 2018

Hotel 1620 Plymouth Harbor

Plymouth, Massachusetts


We often talk at conferences about projects that went well. In contrast, we rarely discuss initiatives that failed, or unexpected obstacles that forced us to find another route to success. In our 2018 Annual Conference, the ACRL New England chapter is highlighting experimentation and creativity in college and research libraries by acknowledging that missteps and roadblocks are all part of the process. Join us in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in May 2018 to talk about “failing forward.”

We want to hear about your innovative ideas that went bust; your project development blunders; your event planning faux pas! Tell us how failure has helped you and your library to learn and grow. Give us insight into the missteps that have led you to unanticipated success. How has expanding your capacity for failure helped you to take risks and experience breakthroughs?


Staff, faculty, administrators, and students in all areas of librarianship are encouraged to submit proposals by January 19, 2018.


See the full call for proposals, including session formats, submission requirements, and the link to submit a proposal, on the conference website:

Questions? Email the 2018 Conference Planning Committee at


EdMedia + Innovate Learning

June 25-29, 2018


For more information go to

Submissions due Jan. 30, 2018


EdMedia + Innovate Learning, the premier international conference in the field since 1987, spans all disciplines and levels of education attracting researchers and practitioners in the field from 70+ countries.

This annual conference offers a forum for the discussion and exchange of research, development, and applications on all topics related to Innovation and Education.

EdMedia + Innovate Learning is an international conference organized by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Co-sponsored by the:


The following nine themes codify the vision and goals of EdMedia + Innovate Learning for advancement and innovation in:

Advanced Technologies for Learning and Teaching

Assessment and Research

Educational Reform, Policy, and Innovation

Evaluation and Quality Improvement Advances

Global Networks, Partnerships, and Exchanges

Innovative Approaches to Learning and Learning Environments

Open Education

Technologies for Socially Responsive Learning

Virtual and Distance Education

Who Attends?

Anyone can attend and/or submit proposals to present at conference. The  conference is designed to engage:

Educators in ALL disciplines


Educational administrators


Curriculum developers

Technology & education companies

Anyone with an interest in educational media

and technology


Leading Change in Academic Libraries

We invite chapter proposals for consideration in the publication of a forthcoming ACRL monograph titled Leading Change in Academic Libraries. Contributing authors are asked to describe and reflect on a recent change in their academic library in which they worked with others in the organization to reorganize, reengineer, innovate, or initiate a service, program, function or structure in your library. Authors will be asked to use Kotter’s (1996) “eight stage process for creating major change” to reflect on their change experience
(for more details or go here: ). Criteria for proposals include the following: 
  • The change experience must have been initiated in the past five years
  • The change experience must have been planned by a working group, team, task force or committee of two or more people
  • The change experience must be in an academic library setting at any type of four year institution serving undergraduate and / or graduate students in the United States
  • The change experience does not have to be fully implemented or deemed a complete success
Authors are expected to have expertise and first-hand knowledge of their particular change experience but do not need to have a particular leadership/management title to contribute. While it is not necessary to have used Kotter’s model during the change process, we are asking contributors to use this model as a mechanism to explain and analyze their change experience.
Proposals should include the names of all authors and institutional affiliations, identification of primary contact with e-mail address, proposed title of chapter, and an abstract of no more than 500 words. 

Authors of accepted proposals will be asked to write a chapter within the range of 12-15 pages, double-spaced, including all text, references, tables, images, and photographs.
Proposal submissions are due to Colleen Boff ( by February 28, 2018If you plan to submit a proposal, please send Colleen a brief email expressing intent to submit.  Questions about this project may also be directed to Colleen.
Editors will respond to proposal contributors by April 15, 2018. Chapters will be due by August 1, 2018. Proposed publication date for monograph is January, 2019.
Information about the Editors
Colleen Boff is the Head Librarian of the Curriculum Resource Center at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. She manages and leads a staff of three in supporting the research and curricular needs of students and faculty in the College of Education and Human Development. She has worked in academic libraries for twenty years and has held a wide range of library management and leadership positions for the past eight years including program coordinator, department chair, Associate Dean and head librarian of a specialized collection. Her research interests vary but are mainly in the areas of educational leadership and policy studies, the application of leadership theories in the academic library setting, and the exploration of cultures of reading.
Catherine Cardwell is the Dean of the Nelson Poynter Memorial Library at the University of South Florida Saint Petersburg. Her responsibilities include providing leadership for and fiscal oversight of the library, online learning services, and instructional technology services. The Library recently completed a new strategic plan and is in the process of its implementation. Prior to joining USFSP in 2016, Catherine served as Director of Libraries at Ohio Wesleyan University. From 1998 to 2011, she was a member of the library faculty at Bowling Green State University, where she served in a variety of leadership positions in the libraries and at the university. Her interests include integrating information literacy and digital scholarship into the curriculum, creating dynamic and contemporary user-centered teaching and learning spaces (both physical and online), and improving discovery and usability of library resources and services.

Library Trends : Disabled Adults in Libraries

Issue title: Disabled Adults in Libraries (title is intentional)
Submission deadline: January 1, 2018
Co-editors: Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich
Submit to:
Publication date: May 2019

Nature and scope of this issue:

Though scholarship about disabilities has been robust in various social science and humanities disciplines for decades, libraries have been slow to theorize or systematically examine the experiences of dis/ability in libraries. This special issue will be geared toward the experience of being a Disabled adult in libraries, as user or worker. Through a mixture of empirical research, case studies, interviews, and theoretical papers, this issue will capture perspectives of Disabled members of our broad library community.

There are many possible approaches one can take to examine disabilities and disability theory. The approach guiding this issue is taken from an in-press work by one of the editors.

There is no universally accepted definition of disabilities or single approach to disability theory. Legalistic definitions, including those presented in the Americans with Disabilities Act and the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities tend to be exclusionary and restrictive in their ideations about humanity. By this, I mean that in their construction of disability and disabled people, they work from a deficit model in which disabled humans are treated as corporeal abnormalities. However, if one out of every seven human beings could be considered disabled, as research demonstrates, disability is a common part of human existence. For many of us, when we talk about in/accessibility in libraries, we’re not just talking about things that others experience; we’re talking about ourselves.

Critical disability studies (CDS) is one approach that offers a way of including disabled people in academic discourse. In this approach, disabled people are participants and researchers who can engage in self-reflexive critiques, not just objects of study. While some theoretical models focus on binary categories that are presented in contrast to each other, such as contrasting social and medical models or disability and impairment, CDS scholars focus on the entire lived experiences of disabled people. This allows for more complicated modes of analysis, such as acknowledging that disabilities may include both social and medical aspects.

We are intentionally seeking out reviewers and authors who have diverse experiences and backgrounds, including library workers of color, library workers who have LGBTQIA+ identities, and those who have Disabled identities. Because we anticipate that several authors will have experience both as Disabled library workers and as Disabled library users, we want to allow either or both perspectives to be incorporated into their research. However, to provide some limits on the scope of this issue, we are focusing on the library experiences of Disabled adults.

January 1, 2018 Article proposals are due
February 1, 2018 Editors will notify people if proposals are accepted
June 1, 2018 Article drafts are due
August 1, 2018 Reviewer feedback will be sent
September/October 2018 Final edits
November 1, 2018 Final manuscripts are due to the publisher

The writing style follows Chicago rules. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the style rules can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal requirements:

A complete proposal will include the following:

  • abstract of proposed article (200-300 words is preferred)
  • a short author biography — it doesn’t have to be formal at this point; we welcome casual explanations of how your background and experience influences your desire to write in this area

Submit to

If you need help with your abstract or framing your article, the Article Framework Questions used by In the Library with the Lead Pipe are very helpful:

If you plan to include statistical analysis, please let us know how you will ensure that your methodology and analysis are solid.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Jessica Schomberg, co-editor
Shanna Hollich, co-editor

Politics of Libraries Conference

April 23, 2017
University of Alberta – School of Library and Information Studies

The spring of 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the turbulent spring of 1968 where social and political movements resulted in protests and strikes across many Western democracies. In France in May of 1968, where unrest was most pointed, some declared the month to be the “début d’une lutte prolongée” or “beginning of a prolonged struggle.” While the protests and strikes seemed to indicate a progressive momentum in the waning period of the so-called ‘golden era’ of the Fordist social contract, the response to the social protests of 1968 (and political radicalism that followed) was the emergence of economic and political neoliberalism. Looking back on 50 years since 1968, we aim to question not what failed in the spring of 1968 nor how a new political and economic order arose, but what is the state of the politics of libraries in 2018? What struggles continue and what new ones must be undertaken?

Reflecting on this 50th anniversary, an interested group of librarians, information professionals, students, and academics is hosting a conference questioning the politics of libraries in 2018, discussed over one day in April 2018 at the University of Alberta. In the spirit of 1968, we invite practitioners, scholars, activists, students, and other members of the general public interested in library allied information services to submit proposals on the issue of the politics of libraries in 2018. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Neutrality in libraries
  • Hegemonic and counter-hegemonic roles of libraries
  • Resistance in library services and work
  • Neoliberalism and its relationship to libraries
  • Precarity in library work

Please submit proposals (not to exceed 400 words) for individual (20 minute presentations) and group/panel contributions using this form by midnight January 30, 2018.

All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process undertaken by the conference organizers. Notification on the status of submissions will be made by mid-February, 2018.

DT&L Conference

Madison, WI

Aug. 7-9, 2018

For full information go to:

We invite you to submit a proposal to present at the 34th annual Distance Teaching & Learning Conference, August 7-9, 2018 in Madison, Wisconsin. We are looking for quality presentations intended for advanced practitioners in distance, online, or blended education and training. We will also consider some basic/foundational proposals geared toward those newer to the field. All proposals should be grounded in evidence-based practice and/or innovative strategies.

Deadline to submit is 4:00 pm (CST) on Tuesday, January 23.

Here are some proposal topics to consider:

ABCs Of DE (Basic)

Accessibility and ADA (section 508) compliance

Alternative credentialing

Augmented/virtual reality

Blended learning designs

Building & supporting learning communities

Distance education leadership/administration

Evaluating online learning

Faculty development

Game-based learning

Immersive learning

Learner engagement strategies

Learner support

Learning analytics and student success

Learning science research to practice

Mastery & competency-based learning

Measuring learning & assessment

Mobile learning

New/emerging technologies

Online teaching strategies

Open resources and content curation

Personalized & adaptive learning

Social learning

Video & multimedia-based learning

All proposals will be peer reviewed and evaluated on these criteria:

Practical methods and techniques that others can use and apply

Clear learning goals and key takeaways

Relevance to the field of distance education and online learning

Depth of knowledge conveyed related to distance teaching, learning, and training

Inclusion of evaluation data and/or established theoretical models

Focus on established or emerging trends, practices, data, and knowledge

Evidence of successful outcomes or lessons learned


9th International Conference on New Horizons in Education (INTE)

The Association of Science, Education and Technology (TASET), Governors State University and Sakarya University are pleased to invite you to the 9th “International Conference on New Horizons in Education” to be held in Paris, France on July 18-20, 2018.

The main aim of this congress is to bring scholars, researchers, educators, students, professionals and other groups interested in education to present their works in educational studies. This conference is now a well-known educational event worldwide and the number of paper submissions and attendees are increasing each year. Prospective presenters are encouraged to submit proposals for oral, poster and video presentations that offer new research and theoretical contributions in the field of education.

All accepted papers will be published in the Proceeding Book.  All English papers will be published  in TOJET ( as a Special Issue. TOJET is indexed on Scopus and ERIC.  Modified version of selected papers will be published in peer reviewed journals such as TOJNED andTOJDEL.


You can submit your abstract through or email at:

For our all conferences please visit TASET at


Proposal & Abstract Submission Deadline: Until July 13, 2018

Full Paper Submission : Until August 20, 2018

Registration: Until July 13, 2018


2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15:



How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at