Category Archives: Academic Libraries

Value of Academic Libraries Travel Scholarships

VAL Call for Proposals

 

For more info go to http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/researchawards/valtravel

The Association of College and Research Libraries is offering travel scholarships of up to $2,000 each for librarians presenting on their work demonstrating the impact of academic libraries in the broader landscape of higher education. This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to communicate to our partners in higher education including administrators, scholars, and teachers working in all disciplines. These travel scholarships support the community in taking up a recommendation from the ACRL report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared by OCLC Research and released in September 2017 for download or purchase) that academic librarians effectively communicate their contributions both up to institutional stakeholders and out to other departments.

ACRL invites applications from those seeking to present work on the impact of academic libraries at higher education conferences or disciplinary conferences where they will reach a wide audience (scholarships will not be awarded for travel to library conferences). The presentations may be based on practice-based work or formal research projects.

To have the greatest possible effect, the committee seeks strong applicants who bring a range of perspectives in terms of types of institutions, geographical regions, and nature of the work presented.

The conference must take place between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019. Reimbursable expenses include conference registration, lodging, travel (round-trip economy airfare, train ticket, or mileage), and meals (up to $50 per diem). The applicant should clearly outline estimated expenses in the budget.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in an academic or research library in the year prior to application for the travel scholarship.

The applicant must have submitted a proposal to the conference where he/she wishes to present at the time of application. Granting of the scholarship is conditional upon the proposal being accepted by that conference.

Criteria

The purpose of the travel scholarships is to support communication about the significance of libraries to other stakeholders in higher education. The presentation may be based on past or current initiatives. A subcommittee of member leaders from the Value of Academic Libraries Committee will review proposals with the following criteria in mind:

  • How well does the proposed presentation align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?
    • The proposal should explicitly state how it supports the VAL objectives in the strategic plan.
  • Does the topic align with current interests and trends in higher education and libraries?
    • The proposal should identify current trends – in scholarship and/or practice – and how the work being presented advances those trends.
  • Is the proposed presentation clear and intriguing? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
    • The proposal should clearly outline its purpose and outcomes, as well as appropriate methodology utilized. If the project/research on which this presentation is based has not yet been completed, a timeline for completion should be outlined.
  • Is the need for funding strongly articulated and demonstrated?
    • The budget should be clearly outlined, along with discussion of any alternative or additional sources of funding.
  • Is the reason for presenting this project at the stated conference compelling? Does it fit closely with stakeholder interests? Why is the presentation format chosen appropriate?
    • The proposal should consider the primary audience of the conference and how the presentation will engage them.

Application Instructions

The application cover sheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other application documents detailed below.

Your application should include:

  1. A completed cover sheet
  2. Conference abstract (maximum 2 pages)
    1. Include the abstract/proposal you submitted to the conference, which should clearly outline the purpose, methodology, and outcomes of the project on which this presentation is based.
  3. Scholarship proposal (maximum 2 pages)
    1. Address how this presentation will contribute to ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries initiative and strategic plan.
    2. The proposal should clearly state why this specific conference is a good place to present based on supporting evidence such as the primary audience and what sort of institutional stakeholders they represent (e.g. administrators, faculty, educational researchers, etc.). Also address the presentation format and why it’s suitable for highlighting the value of academic libraries.
    3. If you collaborated on this project with others, please briefly explain the role of the different members of the project team.
  4. Estimated budget (maximum 2 pages using the budget worksheet provided)
    1. If you stated that you have other funds available from your institution or another source of support to travel to this conference, please explain briefly what this funding supports and why you are seeking an ACRL travel scholarship in addition to it.
    2. Provide an itemized budget with a list of anticipated expenses totaling no more than $2000. Reimbursable expenses include conference registration, lodging, travel (round-trip economy airfare, train ticket, or mileage), and meals (up to $50 per diem).
  5. Your CV or résumé
  6. Statement of institutional support (maximum 1 page)
    1. This should be written by your supervisor, department head, library director, provost, etc. to indicate that they support travel to the conference as part of your professional development and, if applicable, will provide other funds to supplement this scholarship. It does not need to be on letterhead or signed, but should have the statement author’s name, job title, email address, and phone number.

Application Deadlines

The deadline to submit your completed Value of Academic Libraries Travel Scholarship Application for the current round of awards is 5 p.m. Central Time on Friday, August 31, 2018. Applicants will receive notice of the status of their travel scholarship applications by October 19, 2018.

The deadline for the next round will be February 15, 2019 and those applicants will receive notice by April 1. Both of these rounds of applications apply to travel between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Obligations

Award recipients must:

  1. Submit a claim for reimbursable expenses – not exceeding the proposed costs – by Aug. 31, 2019. Include the reimbursement request form and all required documentation.
  2. Acknowledge in their conference presentation that they received ACRL funding.
  3. Provide ACRL staff with a copy of their conference presentation and a brief textual description (abstract) which ACRL may disseminate online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.

Further Information

See the application frequently asked questions for more details about applying.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM)

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM) is a leading double-blind refereed, international journal, charting new qualitative and quantitative developments and techniques for measurement and metrics in information environments.

The journal is concerned with planning and development in libraries and the organizations of which they are part.  We invite authors to submit their original research papers related (but not limited) to the following topics:

  • Measurement, assessment and evaluation in libraries and other information environments
  • Uses of StatsQual, IT metrics, and informetrics to measure and then inform the management of libraries
  • Library and Information service value
  • The library’s role in the measurement of learning and in organisational accreditation
  • The impact and value of using social media in information services.
  • Infonomics
  • The value and impact of information/content/learning objects in education
  • The measurement and assessment of learning
  • Performance measurement and management in higher education, museums and archives
  • The use of ‘business’ and web analytics

Issue submissions should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer-review system.  Registration and access is available at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pmm.

Submissions are accepted anytime.

Editor-in-Chief

Alice L. Daugherty

The University of Alabama

padaugherty@ua.edu

 

This journal is abstracted and indexed by:

  • BFI (Denmark)
  • Current Abstracts;
  • Education Full Text;
  • INSPEC;
  • Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts;
  • Library Literature and Information Science Full Text;
  • OmniFile Full Text Mega;
  • OmniFile Full Text Select;
  • Scopus;
  • zetoc

Digitorium 2018

Event:                  Digitorium Digital Humanities Conference

When:                  Thursday, October 4 – Saturday, October 6, 2018

Where:                 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

for more information go to https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/digitorium/cfp/

We are delighted to invite proposals for Digitorium 2018, a large-scale, international Digital Humanities conference to be held for the fourth time at The University of Alabama, October 4 – 6, 2018.

We seek proposals on Digital Humanities work from researchers, practitioners, and graduate students which showcase innovative ways in which digital methods have brought scholarship and scholarly communities to life, whether locally or globally. We especially welcome proposals which discuss the use of digital methods and their novel results for research, pedagogy, and public scholarship. The conference will host research presentations, roundtables, and workshops throughout the event for participants to gain new digital skills, and to share their expertise in using particular tools. The workshops allow participants to see the scholarly results of using a given digital tool (e.g., OpenRefine, oXygen, Story Maps, QGIS, Paper Machines, Visual Eyes, etc.), and then to learn how to use it themselves. For these sessions, we invite proposals from scholars interested in giving an initial 10-20 minute paper about their research project followed by leading a 30-40 minute hands-on workshop in which they will teach other participants how to use one of the digital tools deployed for the research presentation.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

We have two key “pathways” for which participants can submit abstracts:

  • Digital Methods: presentations on exciting new applications of digital methods, whether to bring an under-served subject to public attention, or to break new ground in established fields.
  • Digital Pedagogy and Public Scholarship: presentations on the use of digital methods in innovative teaching approaches, and for public outreach by universities, libraries, museums, and other institutions who are engaging communities via digital scholarship.

Proposals:

We seek proposals for the following types of presentation for the conference:

  • 20-minute papers.
  • 5-minute lightning talks.
  • Workshops: a 10-20 minute paper followed by leading a hands-on workshop using the tool employed for your research (see above for details).
  • Posters.
  • Digital exhibits
    • Bring your digital exhibit to the conference and present it as you would a poster.
  • Workshops to share techniques which you have found useful.
  • Roundtables.
  • Experiential presentations
    • 20-30 minute workshop-style presentations walking your audience through a digital method which you have used for specific scholarly outcomes.
  • Panels of three or four 20-minute papers or two experiential presentations.
  • Panels comprised of a whole project team.

All proposals should be made via the Submissions page on the conference website.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

For more information about the conference, including our plenary speakers, the venue, and the departments generously offering their support for this event, please explore our website. If you have any questions please feel free to contact Thomas C. Wilson, Associate Dean for Research & Technology at tcwilson@ua.edu.

Digitorium is made possible by the generous support of the University Libraries at The University of Alabama.

E-Learn–World Conference on E-Learning

October 15-18, 2018

Las Vegas, Nevada

For submission information go to https://www.aace.org/conf/elearn/call/

E-Learn–World Conference on E-Learning is an international conference organized by the Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE) and co-sponsored by the International Journal on E-Learning.

This annual conference serves as a multi-disciplinary forum for the exchange of information on research, development, and applications of all topics related to e-Learning in the Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education sectors.

E-Learn, the premiere international conference in the field, spans all disciplines and levels of education and is expected to attracts many leaders in the field from 70+ countries around the world.

We invite you to attend E-Learn and submit proposals for papers, panels, best practices, roundtables, tutorials, workshops, posters/demonstrations, and corporate showcases/demos.The Conference Review Policy requires that each proposal will be peer-reviewed by for inclusion in the conference program, proceedings book, and online proceedings available on LearnTechLib–The Learning and Technology Library.

Topics

The scope of the conference includes, but is not limited to, the following topics as they relate to e-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education. All topics listed here.

  • Content Development
  • Evaluation
  • Implementation Examples and Issues
  • Instructional Design
  • Policy Issues
  • Research
  • Social and Cultural Issues
  • Standards and Interoperability
  • Tools and Systems

The Technical Program includes a wide range of interesting and useful activities designed to facilitate the exchange of ideas and information. These include keynote and invited talks, full and brief paper presentations, poster/demonstration sessions, tutorials, workshops, panels, and best practice sessions. For Presentation Category descriptions, and information about what to submit with your proposal, click here.

  • Keynote Speakers
  • Invited Panels/Speakers
  • Papers
  • Panels
  • Corporate Showcases & Demonstrations
  • Workshops
  • Roundtables
  • Symposia
  • Virtual Papers

For Presentation descriptions, and information about what to submit with your proposal, click here.

Proceedings

Accepted papers will be published in the Proceedings as well as in LearnTechLib, The Learning and Technology Library. These publications will serve as major sources of information for the community, indicating the current state of the art, new trends and new opportunities.

Selected papers may be invited for publication in may be invited for publication in AACE’s respected journals.

Please note that reviewers may reject submissions if the written product shows exceedingly poor grammar or structure. For this reason, all papers and presentations—especially those written by non-native English speakers—should be proofread or copyedited prior to submission.

Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

“We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL Publications book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of fall 2019. Chapter proposals are due August 1st, 2018. Read the full Call for Proposals, including a book chapter template, at: http://bit.ly/HiddenArchitectBook

More about the book: Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries. We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences. Each case study chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work. By using a case study template we will help identify commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through.

If you have any questions, please contact us at hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Information Literacy Coordinator, Cal State Dominguez Hills

Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, University of Southern California

Rebecca Halpern, Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges”

 

Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

​​​​​We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL Publications
book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures,
Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of fall 2019.
Chapter proposals are due August 1st, 2018. Read the full Call for Proposals,
including a book chapter template, at: http://bit.ly/HiddenArchitectBook

More about the book: Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of
academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and
coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional
literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the
definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a
specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is
responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal
contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are
well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program
management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-
represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the
structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in
academic libraries. We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who
identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share
their experiences. Each case study chapter will detail definitions and
missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures,
prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make
programs work. By using a case study template we will help identify
commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions
while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through.

If you have any questions, please contact us at
hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations
Editors: Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2018
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Note: We use the term librarian in this call, but we do not mean to limit submissions to those with an MLS degree. All library workers are encouraged to submit chapter proposals.

Book Description


Research into the construction of librarians’ professional identities indicates a strong emphasis on our work as service providers, from both within the profession and the larger environment in which we exist. When taken to its most extreme conclusion, the service ethos that informs librarianship can turn into what some some in the field informally refer to as “Handmaiden Syndrome”– the expectation that librarians be at the beck and call of faculty, students, patrons, and administrators. This is most visible in traditional, patriarchal constructions of service that rely on hierarchical power structures, such as those present in academia and other educational and cultural institutions. But Roma Harris argues that librarianship has the potential to transform the ideal of service from one that exploits those in service roles toward a more democratic and potentially empowering exchange. To do so means an acknowledgement of the high level of emotional labor on the part of the librarian, who is constantly negotiating her sense of personal worth and professional value in pursuit of “good service.” It also raises questions about what components of identity we ignore or devalue when focusing on service as a defining feature in our profession.

This book will unpack the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and ability combine with an “ethic of service” to create, stagnate, or destruct librarians’ professional identities, sense of self, and self worth. We would like to examine the power structures, values, and contexts that influence our personal, professional, and institutional conceptions of service in libraries, as well as the costs and consequences (to ourselves and our institutions) of these very personal identity negotiations.

Possible Topics

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

Section 1: Situating Service in Librarianship
This introductory section will include a history of service values and behaviors in librarianship. It will examine the ways in which this value has been internalized by practitioners without a clear, agreed upon definition across the different subfields of librarianship.

Section 2: Intersecting Identities & Service
This section will include contributed chapters on the intersections of the ethos of service and personal identity. Questions explored may include:

• How do librarians’ personal identities influence their conception of service in libraries?
• What does service in libraries mean to you?
• In what ways do gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and/or ability influence service expectations of librarians; the ways in which service is performed/carried out; and the ways in which service is perceived by others?
• How do definitions and expectations of service shape professional identities of librarians?
• What are the consequences of not meeting service expectations? How do these consequences differ based on personal identities?
• What is the role of power in service roles and how is influenced by intersectional identity?

Section 3: Reworking the Concept of Service in Libraries
This section will attempt to redefine the concept of service in libraries through a variety of critical theoretical lenses. Contributed chapters may, for example, rework service through a feminist, critical race, or critical disability framework. We also welcome theories and perspectives from other fields. Questions explored may include:

• Do we need a new shared definition of service in libraries?
• Should we abandon the ethos of service in libraries altogether?
• If so, what other professional values should take precedence?
• How can service be redefined to promote a critical, just, and inclusive work and patron environment in libraries? Can it do this?

A variety of traditional and nontraditional scholarship methods are welcome, including but not limited to rhetorical analysis, critical analysis, lyric scholarship, autoethnography, ethnography, phenomenological research, interviews, and other methods of exploring personal and collective identity and the ethos of service.

Timeline
• CFP distributed: April 2, 2018
• Deadline for Chapter Proposals: July 15, 2018
• Notification of Accepted Chapter Proposals: October 1, 2018
• First drafts due: January 15, 2019
• Second drafts due: March 15, 2019
• Final drafts due: June 1, 2019
• Editing: June-August 2019
• Submission of final manuscript: September 1, 2019

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to serviceinlibrariesbook@gmail.com

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter examines the ethos of service in libraries in relation to identity, and/or a larger theoretical framework. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss service in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby, editors, at varellano@gmail.com or jogadsby@gmail.com.

Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy

Bucknell University will host its fifth annual digital scholarship conference (#BUDSC18) from October 5th-7th. The theme of the conference is “Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy.”

#BUDSC18 will bring together a community of practitioners–faculty, researchers, librarians, artists, educational technologists, students, administrators, and others–committed to promoting access to and through digital scholarship. We consider “access” in the broadest possible terms: accessible formats and technologies, access through universal design for learning, access to a mode of expression, access to stories that might not otherwise be heard or that might be lost over time, access to understanding and knowledge once considered beyond reach.

We encourage proposals that explore or critique digital scholarship as it relates to access, broadly conceived. Topics may include, but should not be limited to, the following:

  • Accessibility of digital platforms and technology
  • Access to resources to engage in or produce digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and social change
  • Sustainability and future access to digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and multimodal/interdisciplinary access
  • Access to  digital scholarship beyond the academy
  • The public mission of digital scholarship
  • Creating opportunities for diverse voices and perspectives
  • Designing for access, activism, and advocacy

Submissions may take the form of interactive presentations, project demos, electronic posters, panel discussions, work-in-progress sessions, workshops, lightning talks, or other creative formats.

We look forward to building on the success of the last four years, in which we have come together to discuss challenges, share working models, reflect on projects, and inspire new avenues for actively including students in public scholarly pursuits. For more information, please view our highlights from the 2017 meeting, the conference website and this year’s call.


Proposal Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/4nVllpVvaLEW9Jc02

Proposals are due:  June 30th, 8:00 PM, Eastern Time (US).
Notifications will be sent by July 15th.
If you have any questions please contact: budsc@bucknell.edu

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook

Dear colleagues,

Please consider submitting a chapter proposal to the forthcoming book The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook (to be published with ACRL Publications in 2019). Below is a more detailed description of the topic. Proposals are due July 16th. The call is also available at https://bit.ly/2JNtqNY. And please pardon any cross-posting!

 

Thank you for considering a contribution!

Sarah Morris

 

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We’re looking for lesson plans or projects that support early college students in developing their critical thinking skills, with a particular focus on critical thinking about sources (ACRL Publications). We are seeking informative and approachable plans that librarians can implement to support undergraduate students in developing vital critical thinking skills that can help them succeed in college and beyond. Ensuring that students can not only identify different types of sources, but can also delve more deeply into how and why different types of sources are produced, can be a way to empower students with the skills they need to find, evaluate, and use information for a variety of purposes, in college and beyond.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the Cookbook format. Your 600-800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity that supports undergraduate students in developing skills to help them think critically about sources. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

 

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to acrlcritsources@gmail.com by July 16, 2018

Notifications will be sent out in August 2018

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2018

Cookbook categories:

Section I: Consuming Information

Recipes here will concentrate on identifying and evaluating different types of information with a focus on popular vs. scholarly sources, evaluating information, and recognizing and dealing with misinformation.

Part I: Scholarly Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying scholarly sources
  • Peer review
  • Searching for scholarly sources
  • Understanding the scholarly publishing process

Part II: Popular Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying popular sources
  • Understanding how different popular sources are published
  • Distinguishing between popular and scholarly sources

Part III: Evaluating Sources

Examples include:

  • Revamping the CRAAP test
  • Tools, resources, and activities to help students evaluate sources
  • Games for evaluating sources
  • Detecting and understanding bias

Part IV: Misinformation

Examples include:

  • Fact checking activities
  • Understanding what misinformation is and what forms it can take
  • Recognizing misinformation
  • Strategies for reading and consuming information online

Section II: Producing and Distributing Information

Recipes here will concentrate on helping students better understand how and why different types of sources are produced and how they can produce and use information. Recipes will focus on technology and tools, production and distribution techniques, and 21st century information ecosystems.

Part I: Means of Production

Examples include:

  • Synthesizing sources
  • Remixing sources
  • Producing content for specific audiences

Part II: Technology and Tools

Examples include:

  • Evaluating infographics
  • Creating infographics
  • Working with data
  • Working with social media tools

Part III: Information Distribution

  • Mapping activities to explore how different types of information are presented and interpreted in different forms of media
  • Visualizing information
  • Exploring algorithms

Part IV: 21st Century Information Ecosystems

Examples include:

  • Exploring funding models for different types of information and information outlets
  • Exploring advertising
  • Exploring the role of social media

Email acrlcritsources@gmail.com with any questions. Please refer to The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009), The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), and The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Sarah Morris, Learning and Assessment Librarian, University of Texas at Austin

 

 

Innovations in Learning and Teaching in Academic Libraries

The New Review of Academic Librarianship will publish a themed issue on Innovations in Learning and Teaching in Academic Libraries in summer 2019. The guest editors are Sheila Corrall, Professor of Library and Information Science, University of Pittsburgh, USA (scorrall@pitt.edu) and Liz Jolly, Director of Student and Library Services, Teesside University, UK (liz.jolly@tees.ac.uk).

 

The themed issue will focus on innovative developments in library contributions to the educational mission of their parent institution. Proposed submissions could be reports of empirical investigations of service innovations, state-of-the-art surveys or reviews of emergent practices, or single or multi-site case studies of strategic initiatives. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

  • Innovative contributions to student learning, undergraduate research, faculty teaching, or curriculum development;
  • Innovative approaches to co-creation and incorporation of the student voice;
  • Innovative services and support for first-year students, international students, remote learners, or under-represented groups.
  • Innovative contributions to student enrollment, student experience, student progression and retention, and student success;
  • Innovative collaborations and partnerships with other units, such as careers services, student services, teaching centers, or writing centers;
  • Innovative approaches to measurement and assessment of library impact on student and institutional performance, including participation in learning analytics initiatives.

The deadline for abstract submission is Monday, July 2, 2018.

Abstracts should be around 500 words (excluding references) and cover the background and purpose of the innovation or initiative described, the approach used to investigate the subject (e.g., survey, case-study report), a brief description of the innovation, and the key findings and insights gained, highlighting learning points for academic libraries. Please send your abstract as an email attachment to scorrall@pitt.edu.

 

Abstracts will be evaluated by members of the Editorial Board against the following criteria:

  • Connection and relevance to the issue theme
  • Originality and significance of the innovation described
  • Explanation of the rationale for the innovation
  • Potential impact on professional thinking and practice
  • Clarity and coherence of the written submission.

Proposers will be sent feedback by the end of August 2018. Authors of accepted abstracts will be expected to submit full papers (5,000-7,000 words) by Monday, December 3, 2018.