Category Archives: Academic Libraries

Onboarding 2.0: Methods of Designing and Deploying Effective Onboarding Training for Academic Libraries

We would like to invite you to submit your proposal for an edited volume on “Onboarding 2.0: Methods of Designing and Deploying Effective Onboarding Training for Academic Libraries” to be published by Nova Science Publishers.
Interested scholars should submit a chapter proposal form by October 31, 2017 by visiting
http://secure-web.cisco.com/14-iL_fET3zr46HT5sclBoQEoSK5M3VOC6T2qL5Mi3Ra9PpzVSDaXSVwnqziix3tqVXiuvlm8GCa0q-PMv1zWXnQzXHbd7GfUneRsu_IJiilDtwPboCyHJbRFMFwPE-rKjpG68qS4bvGIP9WnLszPZ9X_7RIC2lGxsmVM9rkkq6VWiRl9LDj03AMWoJxOriLT/http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2FOnboarding-Call-for-Proposals. This form requests the following information: primary contact’s name, primary contact’s email address, primary contact’s institution, tentative title, other co-author(s) names and institutions (if applicable), five keywords, and chapter abstract (max. 300 words; uploaded as a Microsoft Word document). Early submissions are encouraged. All submissions will undergo a rigorous double-blind peer review. The reviewers will recommend full submissions from among the proposals.
The proposal should be a previously unpublished work. Upon acceptance of the chapter proposal, the final chapter should be completed not later than April 1, 2018. Contributions will be blind reviewed and returned with comments by June 1, 2018. Finalized chapters are due no later than July 1, 2018. The final contributions should not exceed 20 double spaced manuscript pages (7,000 words). Guidelines for preparing chapters will be sent to authors upon acceptance of the proposal.
Introduction
Onboarding is defined as the “process of process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating and accelerating new team members, whether they come from outside or inside the organization. The prerequisite to successful onboarding is getting your organization aligned around the need and the role” (Onboarding is defined as the “process of process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating and accelerating new team members, whether they come from outside or inside the organization. The prerequisite to successful onboarding is getting your organization aligned around the need and the role” (HR.com). This edited book provides a comprehensive overview of onboarding library staff, paraprofessionals, and student workers in academic libraries.
Coverage
1. Review of Literature regarding onboarding and libraries
2. Face-to-Face Onboarding Initiatives (could include case studies)
3. Hybrid Onboarding initiatives (could include case studies)
4. Online Onboarding initiatives (could include case studies)
5. Designing Hybrid/Online Onboarding Training
6. Utilizing Learning Analytics
Proposed Timeline
The following represents a timeline for completing the edited volume:
October 31, 2017 – Proposal due including title, abstract, keywords
December 1, 2017 – Notification and additional information for accepted authors
April 1, 2018 – Draft Chapters due
June 1, 2018 – Chapters returned with reviewers’ comments
July 1, 2018 – Final Chapters due
September 2018 – Manuscript due to Nova Science Publishers
Inquiries
Please forward your inquiries to
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D.
Director – Office of Institutional Research & Training
Goldey-Beacom College

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference

Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference
3rd National Conference: March 21-22, 2018
http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/
Call for Proposals (Deadline October 6, 2017)

March 21 (Wednesday) – March 22 (Thursday), 2018

Kelvin Smith Library, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

http://library.case.edu/ksl/services/personallibrarian/conference/

Proposals are now being accepted for the 3rd National Personal Librarian & First Year Experience Library Conference, a 2-day event focused on all aspects of the first year experience and the personalization of outreach and services for incoming students. The conference will be hosted by Kelvin Smith Library at Case Western Reserve University (Cleveland, Ohio) on March 21-22, 2018.

The conference will focus on starting library initiatives to support first year students, assessing outcomes of services and resources, and building the collaborative relationships throughout the organization to prepare a holistic approach to student success and retention.

The 2 days will feature 1-2 keynotes panel discussions, and lightning talks, surrounded by a number of concurrent sessions organized around proposed tracks of interest. Participants are welcomed from all types of organizations and levels of staffing. Programming will be offered to improve established programs or prepare for a new initiative.

We are accepting proposals for concurrent sessions organized by tracks, panel discussions, lightning presentations, and poster presentations. We welcome all proposals for consideration, but are particularly interested in sessions that consider:

  • How to measure impact & success; assessment methods

  • Relationship building (internal & external to the library)

  • The “future” and next generation programs

  • Focus on international students

  • Focus on underserved communities or at risk communities

  • Transition to 2nd year support

  • Strategic ways for engagement and increased participation with FYE Students

  • Other topics will be considered

Other topics may include:

  • “Personal Librarian” services such as direct interactions, custom experiences, etc.

  • Starting new programs or initiatives

  • Views and goals of campus administrators

  • Student stories & testimonies

  • Staffing models

  • Overall role within a larger information literacy instruction program

  • Events, programs, orientations, etc.

  • Challenges & concerns

  • Marketing & communication

  • Diversity issues and approaches

  • Developing relationship with parents

Submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance the thinking about personal librarian programs and first-year experiences. Acceptance will be competitive and conducted by a conference committee consisting of Kelvin Smith Library employees and virtual committee members from several university libraries involved in personal librarian and/or FYE programs.

Registration costs will be the responsibility of each attendee and presenter, and will not be covered by the conference organizers.

SUBMIT PROPOSALS BY October 6, 2017

Web Form:  https://goo.gl/forms/GUAHRsSadQOJd0sr1

Email questions to Brian Gray: bcg8@case.edu

The Innovative Library Classroom (TILC) 2018

Poster Session & Social on Tuesday, May 8 and Conference on Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Radford University, Radford, VA

Powerful and inspiring day! It was a joy to network and meet so many people from different schools interested in library instruction. Every part of the conference, from the sessions, posters, to lightning talks provided thought-provoking topics and information. I’m so glad to be a part of this passionate and creative field of librarianship.“- past attendee

TILC is my favorite conference. Everyone is focused on teaching and learning in libraries and yet it is still small and I can actually talk to folks.“- another participant’s feedback

We are now accepting proposals for TILC 2018. We are thrilled to have Jennifer Ferretti, Digital Initiatives Librarian at Maryland Institute College of Art, as our keynote speaker. She is the creator of the popular “Beyoncé’s Lemonade and Information Resources” LibGuide and in her keynote she will discuss how art is information. You can use this idea as a jumping off point for your proposal, or you can submit anything related to innovative teaching. We like to cast a wide net!    

Proposals are invited for three different session types:

  •       Posters (presented at the Tuesday evening social)
  •       50-minute presentations
  •       7-minute lightning talks

 

Two levels of review will take place. In the peer review, submissions will be rated for fit for the session type, relevance, and innovativeness. In addition, we will crowdsource interest in the topics submitted by authors. Abstracts submitted by authors will be blinded for the crowdsourced portion. Conference coordinators will make the final selections, basing decisions on both the peer review process and the crowdsourced information.

Submission deadline: Thursday, November 16, 2017

Acceptance notification: Friday, January 5, 2018

We expect registration costs to be about $45.

 

Full details and a link to the proposal form are available at: http://theinnovativelibraryclassroom.weebly.com/

 

Selected papers based on conference presentations will be published, subject to double blind peer review, in a special issue of Internet Reference Services Quarterly dedicated to The Innovative Library Classroom. More information about IRSQ is available on the IRSQ website: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wirs20/current#.Uouk8cTIh8E

 

Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Call for chapter proposals

Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm

Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017

Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description

This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.

Possible topics

Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:

  • Critical considerations of:
    • comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
    • comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
    • cataloging practices in relation to comics
    • acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
    • comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
  • Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
  • Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
  • Other relevant considerations of the topic

Timeline

 

  • Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
  • Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
  • First drafts due: June 15, 2018
  • Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
  • Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018

 

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

 

 

About the Editors

 

Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

 

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

18th Distance Library Services Conference

Proposals for panel sessions, poster sessions, and workshops are being accepted for the 18th Distance Library Services Conference. The conference will be held April 11-13, 2018, in San Antonio, TX.

Panel Sessions:

Panel sessions are an opportunity for three or four presenters from different institutions to interactively address an issue of importance to distance librarianship and should focus on helping attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic. Active participation is an important element of these sessions, so panelists are encouraged to engage in debate, pose questions to the audience or each other, and help the audience engage actively.

Poster Sessions:

Poster sessions provide an informal forum to report on innovative projects, introduce new services and resources, or test research ideas of interest to distance librarianship. Posters should be a creative visual representation of a topic, including graphs, tables, charts, and images. A contest will be held to encourage creativity in poster design and content. Attendees will vote on their favorite posters and the winning poster will be awarded a $50 Amazon gift certificate.

Workshops:

Workshops are two (2) hour sessions that provide active learning opportunities for attendees. Participants will engage an issue, learn a new skill, or develop an action plan or other activity where hands-on learning is integral. Workshops should allow participants to be involved in and contribute to the learning process and the learning experience should excite and encourage the participants to be fully engaged. Participants should leave the workshop with ideas, information, techniques, or skills to share with their colleagues. Workshops will be held on the first day of the conference, April 11, 2018..

Proposals will be accepted through Oct. 1, 2017. To submit a proposal, please visit http://libguides.cmich.edu/dls2018/call_for_proposals.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thad Dickinson

Coordinator, Distance Library Services Conference

Central Michigan University

thad.dickinson@cmich.edu

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

ISTE 2018

 Chicago IL

June 24-27, 2018

For more information go to: https://conference.iste.org/2018/presenters/submit_proposal.php

ISTE 2018 is the place where educator-tested strategies come together with proven resources for transforming learning and teaching. It’s also the place to get connected to the brightest minds in edtech, then network with them all year long.

We seek proposals from educators at any career stage, from all backgrounds and all parts of the world, and we love to see student participation in presentations! We also welcome exhibitor proposals that demonstrate noncommercial uses of technology to transform education.

Proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. PT, September 29, 2017.

What makes a good proposal?

We’re looking for presentations that:

  • Take advantage of student-centered pedagogy; show how educators can individualize learning by differentiating instruction and introducing real-world problem-solving; and support your ideas with the latest scientific research on how students learn.
  • Enhance educators’ knowledge. Our goal is to increase both the technical knowledge and the pedagogical content knowledge of educators and teacher candidates.
  • Help develop leadership skills. Explore ways to encourage and empower educators and students to lead.
  • Advance digital age learning. Delve into systems, models, practices and strategies for creating meaningful digital age learning experiences, both virtual and face to face.
  • Address the ISTE Standards. How does your proposal support the ISTE Standards? Provide a model for achieving standards-aligned objectives.
  • Encourage audience participation. Think beyond the lecture and devise new ways to engage your audience. Our session formats include interactive lectures, BYODs, snapshots, roundtables, open-area poster sessions and more. Demonstrate the use of technology to model instructional best practices.
  • Add to the conversation around current relevant challenges, including computer science and integration of computer science into curriculum, higher ed topics and virtual reality.

 

OK-ACRL Conference

Information is not neutral. The concept of “authority” includes innate bias toward people with privilege. The cultural, socioeconomic, and racial backgrounds of students have an effect on the way they seek information. Access to information is a human rights issue.
These are all examples of ideas that fall under the umbrella of “Critical Librarianship.” (http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/keeping_up_with/critlib) How are you applying these ideas in your library? Where do you see a need for critlib at your institution? How can we serve our students more equitably? How can we increase diversity within the profession?
Brainstorm and submit a proposal to present at the 2017 OK-ACRL Conference. Proposals are due October 6th and presenters will be notified of acceptance by October 20th. Please contact Karl Siewert at siewert@nsuok.edu with any questions. The conference will be held on the Oklahoma State University Tulsa campus on November 10, 2017.

CARL 2018: The Academic Library in Times of Change

April 13-15, 2018

Pullman San Francisco Bay Hotel, Redwood City, California

California Academic & Research Libraries

Submission Form now Open!

Change is an inevitable and can be a welcome part of our jobs. In this ever-changing landscape, libraries are feeling pressure to provide solutions to many and various challenges: shifts in access to our resources, “evolving” ideas of credibility and authority, increasing threats to our patrons’ civil liberties, a movement to “all-things-digital”, staff/library reorganization, and more. How can libraries rise to the challenges of engaging our students and colleagues, advocating for our communities, and protecting our democracy? The CARL 2018 Conference builds upon the CARL 2016 Conference, “What we talk about when we talk about value…” by asking: How will we, as libraries, navigate change, reassert and use our core values to ground our everyday work, strengthen our advocacy, and buoy our hopes in times of uncertainty?

From a March 2017 article in American Libraries, trends to watch include: entrepreneurship, civic engagement and innovation, school libraries as global educators, sustainability, virtual reality, welcoming communities, accessibility, academic tech focus, and 21st century ethics. What do these trends look like on a more local level, and how can we translate them into the work we do on a day-to-day basis?

Sessions will include, but are not limited to, the following areas:

The Library Bill of Rights and the core values of librarianship; issues of equal access, diversity, and inclusion; concerns with intellectual freedom, privacy, and censorship

  • Misinformation, disinformation, and educating users
  • New ways of understanding the user experience to shape library services and programs
  • Open access, OER, scholarly communication, and copyright challenges
  • Resource sharing, consortial practices, shared collections, and discovery systems
  • Changing roles of librarians, and the larger changes in the profession
  • Innovations in acquisitions and technical services: Cataloging, RDA implementation, electronics rights management, demand-driven acquisition, eBooks, and big data/library metrics
  • Collaborative partnerships on- and off-campus

Successful proposals should demonstrate fearless risk-taking, quirky approaches to the same old problems, and down-right insanity when it comes to embracing change.

We will accept proposals on your research or practice related to the conference theme for the following session types:

  • Preconference Sessions: These 4-hour workshop sessions will provide a research framework for practical activities that engage participants around a topic. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Research into Practice Sessions: These sessions will present original research around the conference theme in a 60-minute session. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Engaging in Practice Sessions: This presentation is a 60-minute session that is structured to include audience participation in the form of engaging discussion questions or activities, and have a practical take-away for the attendees. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Panel Presentations: These sessions bring together 2-5 presenters into a cohesive conversation intended to engage audience members in a 60-minute session. The due date for these proposals will be October 1, 2017.
  • Poster Sessions: This sessions will be posters on a topic related to the conference theme. The due date for these proposals will be January 15, 2018.
  • Round Table Discussions: These sessions will offer conversation on a current topic in libraries, in a casual, round table setting. The due date for these proposals will be January 15, 2018.

Fine Print

All presenters must register and pay for the conference.  All presenters, regardless of session type, will be asked to submit a paper and/or summary of their session to the proceedings.

Important Dates

 July 19, 2017 – Submission Form Open

Sept. 1, 2017 – Registration Opens

Oct. 1, 2017 – Proposals Due for Pre-Conference, Research into Practice, Engaging in Practice and Panels

Nov. 1, 2017 – Selections Announced

Jan. 15, 2018 – Proposals Due for Posters and Round Table Discussions

Feb. 1, 2018 – Final Program Announced

March 2, 2018 – Early Bird Registration Ends

If you have any questions about the conference, please contact the conference planning team.

Conference Planning Team

Allison Carr, Chair, Conference Planning Team
Lee Adams, Conference Planning Team
Joseph Aubele, Conference Planning Team
Talitha Matlin, Conference Planning Team