Category Archives: ACRL

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook

Dear colleagues,

Please consider submitting a chapter proposal to the forthcoming book The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook (to be published with ACRL Publications in 2019). Below is a more detailed description of the topic. Proposals are due July 16th. The call is also available at https://bit.ly/2JNtqNY. And please pardon any cross-posting!

 

Thank you for considering a contribution!

Sarah Morris

 

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We’re looking for lesson plans or projects that support early college students in developing their critical thinking skills, with a particular focus on critical thinking about sources (ACRL Publications). We are seeking informative and approachable plans that librarians can implement to support undergraduate students in developing vital critical thinking skills that can help them succeed in college and beyond. Ensuring that students can not only identify different types of sources, but can also delve more deeply into how and why different types of sources are produced, can be a way to empower students with the skills they need to find, evaluate, and use information for a variety of purposes, in college and beyond.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the Cookbook format. Your 600-800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity that supports undergraduate students in developing skills to help them think critically about sources. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

 

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to acrlcritsources@gmail.com by July 16, 2018

Notifications will be sent out in August 2018

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2018

Cookbook categories:

Section I: Consuming Information

Recipes here will concentrate on identifying and evaluating different types of information with a focus on popular vs. scholarly sources, evaluating information, and recognizing and dealing with misinformation.

Part I: Scholarly Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying scholarly sources
  • Peer review
  • Searching for scholarly sources
  • Understanding the scholarly publishing process

Part II: Popular Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying popular sources
  • Understanding how different popular sources are published
  • Distinguishing between popular and scholarly sources

Part III: Evaluating Sources

Examples include:

  • Revamping the CRAAP test
  • Tools, resources, and activities to help students evaluate sources
  • Games for evaluating sources
  • Detecting and understanding bias

Part IV: Misinformation

Examples include:

  • Fact checking activities
  • Understanding what misinformation is and what forms it can take
  • Recognizing misinformation
  • Strategies for reading and consuming information online

Section II: Producing and Distributing Information

Recipes here will concentrate on helping students better understand how and why different types of sources are produced and how they can produce and use information. Recipes will focus on technology and tools, production and distribution techniques, and 21st century information ecosystems.

Part I: Means of Production

Examples include:

  • Synthesizing sources
  • Remixing sources
  • Producing content for specific audiences

Part II: Technology and Tools

Examples include:

  • Evaluating infographics
  • Creating infographics
  • Working with data
  • Working with social media tools

Part III: Information Distribution

  • Mapping activities to explore how different types of information are presented and interpreted in different forms of media
  • Visualizing information
  • Exploring algorithms

Part IV: 21st Century Information Ecosystems

Examples include:

  • Exploring funding models for different types of information and information outlets
  • Exploring advertising
  • Exploring the role of social media

Email acrlcritsources@gmail.com with any questions. Please refer to The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009), The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), and The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Sarah Morris, Learning and Assessment Librarian, University of Texas at Austin

 

 

ACRL Science and Technology Section Annual Research Forum and Poster sessions

The Research Committee of the ACRL Science and Technology Section is hosting
its Annual Research Forum (Sunday, June 24, 2018) and Poster Session (Sunday,
June 24, 2018) at the 2018 American Library Association Annual Conference in
New Orleans.

The Research Forum and Poster Session provide an excellent opportunity to
share a wide range of research projects relevant to science and technology
librarianship.

Submissions for the paper and poster presentations are selected based on the
quality of the abstract and the demonstration of significant progress toward
completing the research project by June 2018.  Your submission should include:
-brief background information about your project,
-the research question or problem that drove your project,
-the methods used,
-your findings and a brief discussion that includes the impact of your
project.

Your proposal should total no more than 250 words. Because this is a blind
review process, be sure to include your name, institution, phone, and email
addresses of all participants (not part of word count) separate from your
abstract (the form has separate fields for these items).

Please submit your proposal via this form: goo.gl/LqfEbV

Submission Categories:
Research Forum Featured Paper Presentation.  The Featured Paper Presentation
is 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a thoughtful 10-minute
critique from a guest commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to
prepare the paper for publication.  Proposals should reflect research that has
been completed or initiatives that have already been implemented. At a
minimum, significant progress should have been made toward completion or
implementation.
Research Forum Short Paper Presentations.  Short Papers are 10 minutes in
length and will be followed by a thoughtful 5-minute critique from a guest
commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to prepare the paper for
publication or generate additional ideas that will move the paper forward.
Proposals should reflect research or initiatives that have been completed or
are currently in progress.
Poster Presentations.  Posters should cover research endeavors or practitioner
projects that enhance science and technology librarianship.  Proposals should
provide useful and practical findings, and describe opportunities for
discussion with participants.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: Friday, February 23, 2018.  Submissions
are selected by the STS Research Committee. The Committee adheres to mentoring
principles and a “blind” review process to select proposals. We strongly
encourage you to remove any identifying information in your proposal prior to
submission; otherwise, the STS Research Committee co-chairs will take
responsibility for removing identifying information, which may unintentionally
alter the text of your submission.

Acceptance of proposals reflects a commitment by the author(s) to present at
the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans. Travel support from STS is not
available. Specific logistical details will follow upon acceptance.  Please
submit your proposal via this form: goo.gl/LqfEbV

If you have any questions, please ask the STS Research Committee co-chairs:
Amy Van Epps, amy_vanepps@harvard.edu
Hannah Gascho Rempel, hannah.rempel@oregonstate.edu

Failing Forward: Experimentation and Creativity in Libraries

2018 ACRL New England Chapter Annual Conference

Friday, May 4, 2018

Hotel 1620 Plymouth Harbor

Plymouth, Massachusetts

https://acrlnec.org/annual-conference/call-for-proposals

#acrlnec18

We often talk at conferences about projects that went well. In contrast, we rarely discuss initiatives that failed, or unexpected obstacles that forced us to find another route to success. In our 2018 Annual Conference, the ACRL New England chapter is highlighting experimentation and creativity in college and research libraries by acknowledging that missteps and roadblocks are all part of the process. Join us in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in May 2018 to talk about “failing forward.”

We want to hear about your innovative ideas that went bust; your project development blunders; your event planning faux pas! Tell us how failure has helped you and your library to learn and grow. Give us insight into the missteps that have led you to unanticipated success. How has expanding your capacity for failure helped you to take risks and experience breakthroughs?

 

Staff, faculty, administrators, and students in all areas of librarianship are encouraged to submit proposals by January 19, 2018.

 

See the full call for proposals, including session formats, submission requirements, and the link to submit a proposal, on the conference website: https://acrlnec.org/annual-conference/call-for-proposals

Questions? Email the 2018 Conference Planning Committee at acrlnec2018@gmail.com.

 

ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice)

The ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Committee invites you to submit a preliminary proposal for its CLIPP publication series. We welcome proposals on any topic that is relevant for small and mid-sized academic libraries. The CLIPP series allows library staff to share information on practices and procedures they have implemented to address common issues or concerns. Each CLIPP follows a set structure of three parts (literature review, survey results, and sample documents), and should both describe library best practices and provide useful, specific examples that libraries can refer to when developing similar policies and procedures of their own.

Authors of a CLIPP publication are aided throughout by the CLIPP Committee and an assigned editor. CLIPP authors receive 10% of the royalties on the net revenues from their publication. For your reference, please find author instructions and more information about the CLIPP program at http://bit.ly/2bjTTDP.

CLIPP proposals are accepted throughout the year. The next Preliminary Proposal Deadline is December 15, 2017. The CLIPP Committee will send out notifications regarding this round of submissions by January 17, 2018.

For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact:

Mary Francis

CLIPP Committee Chair

Email: mary.francis@dsu.edu

ACRL 2019

April 10-13, 2019

Cleveland, OH

ACRL invites you to share your research and creative endeavors with your colleagues at ACRL 2019.

For more information go to https://conference.acrl.org/conference-content/

Today’s academic and research libraries are vibrant and fast moving, responding quickly to changes in the higher education landscape. Just as our host city of Cleveland has undergone a revitalization in recent years, librarians must continually reinvent themselves to stay on the cutting edge.

Join your colleagues in Recasting the Narrative of what it means to be a librarian in the 21st century, adapting and leading the transition to new roles.

Proposal Deadlines

May 4, 2018
Contributed Paper, Panel, Preconference, Workshop

October 12, 2018
Poster, Roundtable, TechConnect, Webcast

SUBMIT NOW!

Notifications

Contributed paper, panel session, preconference, and workshop proposal notifications – issued early August 2018.

Poster session, roundtable discussion, TechConnect, and Virtual Conference webcast notifications – issued early January 2019.

 

 

Fact, False, or Just Flawed: Critically Examining News in the Age of Truthiness

The ACRL Delaware Valley Chapter is now accepting lightning round proposals for its Fall program: Fact, False, or Just Flawed: Critically Examining News in the Age of Truthiness. The event will be held on Friday, November 17, 2017 from 9:00 AM to 3:30 PM at the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

 

Have you developed a new campus partnership, program, or resource that addresses news literacy? Excited about a simple but powerful technique that you want to share with interested colleagues? Submit a lightning round proposal to teach folks to spot false, misleading, and all other shades of duplicitous public discourse. Topics may include…

  • Statistics in reporting
  • Scientific studies in the news
  • Bias in the news
  • Evaluating non-textual information (photos, video, infographics)
  • Government sources
  • Filter bubbles

There is no slide limit, but the round cannot exceed 10 minutes, so practice, practice, practice!

 

Submit your proposal online: https://goo.gl/forms/8cZjmi14qfvXiSbz2  

Deadline: October 20, 2017

Notification of acceptance by: October 30, 2017

 

Questions? Email Nancy Bellafante at nancybe@law.upenn.edu

OK-ACRL Conference

Information is not neutral. The concept of “authority” includes innate bias toward people with privilege. The cultural, socioeconomic, and racial backgrounds of students have an effect on the way they seek information. Access to information is a human rights issue.
These are all examples of ideas that fall under the umbrella of “Critical Librarianship.” (http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/keeping_up_with/critlib) How are you applying these ideas in your library? Where do you see a need for critlib at your institution? How can we serve our students more equitably? How can we increase diversity within the profession?
Brainstorm and submit a proposal to present at the 2017 OK-ACRL Conference. Proposals are due October 6th and presenters will be notified of acceptance by October 20th. Please contact Karl Siewert at siewert@nsuok.edu with any questions. The conference will be held on the Oklahoma State University Tulsa campus on November 10, 2017.

2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium

Call for Poster Submissions:

The Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter of ACRL is soliciting poster proposals for its December 1st 2017 Symposium. The theme of this year’s symposium is exploring the mission of academic and research libraries in the 21st century information environment.

We are interested in case studies and concrete examples of ways in which the changing information landscape has and will continue to affect the mission of academic and research libraries.

Examples include, but are not limited to: ·       Information literacy, students, and crises of authority in the contemporary information world ·       The academic librarian as research advisor ·       Educating new librarians for the 21st century academic library mission ·       Challenges related to preservation, accessibility and discoverability of research-valuable information.

Selection will be done by a blind review; please do not include any identifying information in your abstract.

Proposals can be submitted athttps://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/z5jimza067i5kk/

Proposal deadline: Monday, September 4th.

The 2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium will be held on Friday, December 1st at the Baruch College (CUNY) Vertical Campus, 55 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010. Successful candidates will be notified by early October.

On the day of the Symposium, you will be expected to arrive by 8:30 am, set up by 9:00 am and stay through the end of the day (3:45 pm). Posters will be displayed on 5’x2’ tables and cannot be displayed on walls.

If you have questions about the poster selection process, please contact Maureen Clements at mclements2@mercy.edu

ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Have you begun piloting or experimenting with applications of ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education? Do you have an assignment or activity to share on a threshold concept? Do you have a fruitful collaboration with faculty in implementing the Framework at your institution? If so, the Academic Library Association of Ohio’s (ALAO) Instruction Interest group invites you to share your activities and experiences at our Spring Workshop on Thursday, April 20th at the State Library of Ohio.

ALAO’s Instruction Interest Group (IIG) is looking for presenters who have designed and taught library assignments or activities that teach any of the six threshold concepts. Do you have fresh ideas you’d like to present? Now’s your chance!

We are interested in breakout sessions that offer insights in any of the following topics:

 Adapting or creating new assignments or activities

  • One-shot instruction and the new Framework
  • Practical applications of the Framework
  • Setting learning outcomes
  • Best practices and discoveries
  • Finding common ground between the old Standards and new Framework
  • Collaboration with Faculty
  • Curriculum mapping
  • Online learning modules/tutorials

The deadline for proposals for is Feb. 15, 2017. To submit your idea, please click on the following link and fill out the form: https://goo.gl/forms/5nylQF3nUW6hYU1d2. Session proposals will be reviewed by the IIG planning committee.

Please e-mail any questions to IIG Co-Chairs Dana Knott (dknott@cscc.edu) and Mark Eddy (mxe37@case.edu). 

Credit-bearing Information Literacy Courses: Critical Approaches

Call for chapter proposals

Working title: Credit-bearing Information Literacy Courses: Critical Approaches

Critical librarianship understands the work of libraries and librarians to be fundamentally political and situated in systems of power and oppression. This approach requires that information literacy instruction expand its scope beyond straightforward demonstrations of tools and search mechanics and towards more in-depth conceptual work that asks questions about, among other things, the conditions of information production, presumptions of neutrality, and institutionalized oppression.

The goal of this book is to examine those critical approaches specifically in the context of credit-bearing courses. This will be useful to librarians who have struggled to find literature and case studies that directly address the unique features of teaching a credit-bearing course, including course and lesson planning, designing formative and summative assessment measures that address course-level learning outcomes, and building rapport with students.

Contributed chapters will discuss some of the ways these concepts have been developed, implemented, and assessed in various course contexts. Those who teach information literacy courses draw from many influences, including (but not limited to) literacy studies, social justice work, and sociological and anthropological approaches. This book will highlight the diversity of possibilities for implementing a critical approach to teaching information literacy in credit-bearing courses.

The book will include both discussions of conceptual approaches and case studies. Contributed chapters will be divided into appropriate sections, based on their foci.

We invite chapters on topics including, but not limited to, the following, within the context of a credit-bearing class:

  • Feminist/anti-racist/anti-colonial approaches to curriculum development
  • Critical approaches to grading and assessment
  • Unique challenges and opportunities of incorporating a critical approach in a credit course vs. one-shot/course-integrated instruction session
  • Critical reflection about instructor positionality vis-a-vis critical content and/or relationship to students
  • Conceptions of neutrality and objectivity with regard to information literacy and potentially controversial (and/or political) subject matter
  • Difficulty of critical approaches in a stand alone information literacy course (and/or criticisms of the credit-bearing mode of instruction)
  • Approaches that critique the academy and/or higher education and the neoliberal discourses that shape it
  • Reflections on the process of adopting a critical approach, whether shifting the content to critical information literacy or adopting other practices from critical pedagogies (like eschewing the banking model of education, breaking down hierarchies, incorporating social justice, etc)

Proposal submission guidelines:

  1. Abstract of up to 500 words – submit as a google document shared with creditclassbook@gmail.com
  2. Author/s CV – email to creditclassbook@gmail.com

Please feel free to email the editors with any questions about the suitability of proposal ideas or the scope of the publication.

Timeline

Proposals (up to 500 words) due February 27
Notifications sent out by March 17
Completed manuscripts (tentatively 3,000-6,000 words) due June 30

Publisher: ACRL Press

Editors:

Angela Pashia is an Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor at the University of West Georgia. She regularly teaches an undergraduate level credit bearing information literacy course. She also teaches an online course for Library Juice Academy, “Developing a Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Course.”

Jessica Critten is an Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor at the University of West Georgia. She teaches a credit-bearing information literacy course that focuses on news and media literacy.