Category Archives: ACRL

2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium

Call for Poster Submissions:

The Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter of ACRL is soliciting poster proposals for its December 1st 2017 Symposium. The theme of this year’s symposium is exploring the mission of academic and research libraries in the 21st century information environment.

We are interested in case studies and concrete examples of ways in which the changing information landscape has and will continue to affect the mission of academic and research libraries.

Examples include, but are not limited to: ·       Information literacy, students, and crises of authority in the contemporary information world ·       The academic librarian as research advisor ·       Educating new librarians for the 21st century academic library mission ·       Challenges related to preservation, accessibility and discoverability of research-valuable information.

Selection will be done by a blind review; please do not include any identifying information in your abstract.

Proposals can be submitted athttps://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/z5jimza067i5kk/

Proposal deadline: Monday, September 4th.

The 2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium will be held on Friday, December 1st at the Baruch College (CUNY) Vertical Campus, 55 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010. Successful candidates will be notified by early October.

On the day of the Symposium, you will be expected to arrive by 8:30 am, set up by 9:00 am and stay through the end of the day (3:45 pm). Posters will be displayed on 5’x2’ tables and cannot be displayed on walls.

If you have questions about the poster selection process, please contact Maureen Clements at mclements2@mercy.edu

ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

Have you begun piloting or experimenting with applications of ACRL’s new Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education? Do you have an assignment or activity to share on a threshold concept? Do you have a fruitful collaboration with faculty in implementing the Framework at your institution? If so, the Academic Library Association of Ohio’s (ALAO) Instruction Interest group invites you to share your activities and experiences at our Spring Workshop on Thursday, April 20th at the State Library of Ohio.

ALAO’s Instruction Interest Group (IIG) is looking for presenters who have designed and taught library assignments or activities that teach any of the six threshold concepts. Do you have fresh ideas you’d like to present? Now’s your chance!

We are interested in breakout sessions that offer insights in any of the following topics:

 Adapting or creating new assignments or activities

  • One-shot instruction and the new Framework
  • Practical applications of the Framework
  • Setting learning outcomes
  • Best practices and discoveries
  • Finding common ground between the old Standards and new Framework
  • Collaboration with Faculty
  • Curriculum mapping
  • Online learning modules/tutorials

The deadline for proposals for is Feb. 15, 2017. To submit your idea, please click on the following link and fill out the form: https://goo.gl/forms/5nylQF3nUW6hYU1d2. Session proposals will be reviewed by the IIG planning committee.

Please e-mail any questions to IIG Co-Chairs Dana Knott (dknott@cscc.edu) and Mark Eddy (mxe37@case.edu). 

Credit-bearing Information Literacy Courses: Critical Approaches

Call for chapter proposals

Working title: Credit-bearing Information Literacy Courses: Critical Approaches

Critical librarianship understands the work of libraries and librarians to be fundamentally political and situated in systems of power and oppression. This approach requires that information literacy instruction expand its scope beyond straightforward demonstrations of tools and search mechanics and towards more in-depth conceptual work that asks questions about, among other things, the conditions of information production, presumptions of neutrality, and institutionalized oppression.

The goal of this book is to examine those critical approaches specifically in the context of credit-bearing courses. This will be useful to librarians who have struggled to find literature and case studies that directly address the unique features of teaching a credit-bearing course, including course and lesson planning, designing formative and summative assessment measures that address course-level learning outcomes, and building rapport with students.

Contributed chapters will discuss some of the ways these concepts have been developed, implemented, and assessed in various course contexts. Those who teach information literacy courses draw from many influences, including (but not limited to) literacy studies, social justice work, and sociological and anthropological approaches. This book will highlight the diversity of possibilities for implementing a critical approach to teaching information literacy in credit-bearing courses.

The book will include both discussions of conceptual approaches and case studies. Contributed chapters will be divided into appropriate sections, based on their foci.

We invite chapters on topics including, but not limited to, the following, within the context of a credit-bearing class:

  • Feminist/anti-racist/anti-colonial approaches to curriculum development
  • Critical approaches to grading and assessment
  • Unique challenges and opportunities of incorporating a critical approach in a credit course vs. one-shot/course-integrated instruction session
  • Critical reflection about instructor positionality vis-a-vis critical content and/or relationship to students
  • Conceptions of neutrality and objectivity with regard to information literacy and potentially controversial (and/or political) subject matter
  • Difficulty of critical approaches in a stand alone information literacy course (and/or criticisms of the credit-bearing mode of instruction)
  • Approaches that critique the academy and/or higher education and the neoliberal discourses that shape it
  • Reflections on the process of adopting a critical approach, whether shifting the content to critical information literacy or adopting other practices from critical pedagogies (like eschewing the banking model of education, breaking down hierarchies, incorporating social justice, etc)

Proposal submission guidelines:

  1. Abstract of up to 500 words – submit as a google document shared with creditclassbook@gmail.com
  2. Author/s CV – email to creditclassbook@gmail.com

Please feel free to email the editors with any questions about the suitability of proposal ideas or the scope of the publication.

Timeline

Proposals (up to 500 words) due February 27
Notifications sent out by March 17
Completed manuscripts (tentatively 3,000-6,000 words) due June 30

Publisher: ACRL Press

Editors:

Angela Pashia is an Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor at the University of West Georgia. She regularly teaches an undergraduate level credit bearing information literacy course. She also teaches an online course for Library Juice Academy, “Developing a Credit-Bearing Information Literacy Course.”

Jessica Critten is an Instructional Services Librarian and Associate Professor at the University of West Georgia. She teaches a credit-bearing information literacy course that focuses on news and media literacy.

CritLib: Theory and Action

Friday, November 11, 2016
The Inn at Swarthmore, Swarthmore, PA

The Association of College and Research Libraries/Delaware Valley Chapter seeks proposals for panel presentation and discussion on critical librarianship as it pertains to:

  •     Instruction
  •     Hiring practices
  •     Cataloging
  •     Collection  development
  •     Access
  •     Community outreach


Each panelist will give a 15-minutes presentation on specific strategies they have used to address critical librarianship in these areas. After the presentation they will participate in a moderated discussion and answer questions from the audience.

Please send a brief summary of your talk to Anne Schwelm, Secretary, ACRL/DVC: aschwelm@cabrini.edu.

Submission deadline: Friday, October 21st.

ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Publication Series

The ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Committee invites you to submit a preliminary proposal for its CLIPP publication series. We welcome proposals on any topic that is relevant for small and midsized academic libraries. The CLIPP series allows library staff to share information on practices and procedures they have implemented to address common issues or concerns. Each CLIPP follows a set structure of three parts (literature review, survey results, and sample documents), and should both describe library best practices and provide useful, specific examples that libraries can refer to when developing similar policies and procedures of their own. 

Authors of a CLIPP publication are aided throughout by the CLIPP Committee and an assigned editor. CLIPP authors receive 10% of the royalties on the net revenues from their publication. For your reference, please find author instructions and more information about the CLIPP program at http://bit.ly/2bjTTDP.

CLIPP proposals are accepted throughout the year. The next preliminary proposal deadline is September 23, 2016. The CLIPP Committee will send out notifications regarding this round of submissions by October 3, 2016.

For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact:

Diana Symons

CLIPP Committee Chair

Email: dsymons@csbsju.edu  

Social Sciences Librarian

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University

Exploring Online Student Engagement: Encouraging Active Learning at a Distance

Do you encourage active learning in your online instruction? Do you have strategies for promoting online student engagement? Would you like to share what you’ve learned with your colleagues?

The ACRL Distance Learning Section Instruction Committee would like to invite you to submit a proposal to be part of our Spring Online Panel Discussion where participants will share strategies and practical tips for engaging students and promoting active learning in online environments. The proposal from can be found here:

http://goo.gl/forms/qa5DnPP2aI

Proposals should not be more than 300 words in length and should include a very brief biographical sketch (additional 150 words or less) of the presenter(s), as well as links to any online materials that will be discussed in the presentation, if available. The Distance Learning Section Instruction Committee will review and select from the proposals submitted. The deadline for submitting proposals is March 9th, 2016.

Submit your proposal now! 

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section 2016 Poster Session Call for Proposals

The Women & Gender Studies Section will hold its 9th annual Research Poster Session during our General Membership Meeting at the ALA Annual Conference in Orlando on Saturday, June 25, 2016, from 4:30-5:30 p.m. (The schedule is not finalized, this may change.) The forum seeks to provide an opportunity to present newly completed research or work in progress. Both beginning and established researchers are welcome to apply. Participants may receive collaborative feedback and recommendations for future publishing and/or new initiatives.

The potential scope of the topics includes, but is not limited to, teaching methods, instruction, information technology, collection development, interdisciplinarity, and collaboration with academic faculty. For research ideas, see the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

 

The committee is especially interested in receiving submissions which highlight the ways in which librarians work with faculty and/or establish faculty partnerships. However, as stated above, submissions are NOT limited to this particular theme.

Applicants chosen to present their work at the poster session are expected to supply presentation materials, including poster boards. Tables for presentation materials will be provided.  Attendees at the forum will find an arena for discussion and networking with their colleagues interested in related issues and trends in the profession.

The committee will use a blind peer review process. 

Selection criteria:

1. Significance of the topic. Priority will be given to Women and Gender Studies Section members and/or women and gender studies topics

2. Originality of the project

Proposal submission instructions:

1. Proposals should include:  

          Title of the proposal

          Proposal narrative (no more than 2 pages, double spaced) 

          Name of applicant(s) 

          Affiliation (s) 

          Applicant Email address(es), Phone number(s)  

          Are you a member of the Women & Gender Studies Section? 

If you would like to become a member, go to: http://www.libr.org/wgss/join.html

2. NOTE: Submission deadline: March 31, 2016

3. Proposals should be emailed to: Jennifer Gilley, Chair, Research Committee, WGSS (jrg15@psu.edu)

4. The chair will notify the applicants by April 29, 2016

If you are aware of other groups who would be interested in knowing about this call, please forward this message as appropriate. Thanks!

ACRL 2017

Baltimore, MD

March 22-25, 2017

http://conference.acrl.org/

Call for proposals at http://conference.acrl.org/conference-content/

Proposal Deadlines

May 6, 2016 Contributed papers, panel sessions, workshops, and preconferences proposals due

October 14, 2016 Poster sessions, roundtable discussions, TechConnect presentations, and virtual conference webcasts proposals due.

As an attendee you can expect:

  • More than 500 carefully curated conference programs selected and presented by leaders in the profession.
  • A variety of formal and informal opportunities to network with more than 3,000 of your peers and colleagues.
  • Exhibits from more than 200 companies highlighting the newest products and services available in the academic library community.
  • Three dynamic keynote sessions that will inspire your work in your library and beyond.
  • One year of free access to the ACRL 2017 Virtual Conference, including more than 130 slidecasts, discussions, and more.

Requirements

ACRL 2017 presenters will be required to:

  • register for and attend the conference (complimentary registration may be requested for non-librarian presenters on the submission form);
  • grant permission for possible recording (slidecasts) and broadcast of their presentation; assign ACRL first publication rights, as contributed papers will be published as part of the ACRL conference proceedings; and
  • contributed paper presenters must provide completed papers in both hard copy and electronic versions by the deadline date.

Selection criteria The ACRL 2017 Conference committees will evaluate the content of your proposal for relevance to the conference tracks and theme, clarity, originality, and timeliness. Proposals should be for original work that has not been previously published.  Special attention will be given to proposals that:

  • demonstrate innovative thinking;
  • generate ideas or report research that contribute to ongoing discussion about the future of academic and research libraries;
  • contribute ideas for positioning academic and research librarians to be leaders both on and off campus; present strategies for effectively implementing new ideas and technology; and
  • encourage active learning among conference attendees.

Questions should be directed to Margot Conahan at mconahan@ala.org.

 

ACRL National Library Marketing & Outreach Interest Group Greater NYC Area

Call for Lightning Round Presentations: Spring 2016 Meeting of the ACRL National Library Marketing & Outreach Interest Group-Greater NYC Area

ACRL National Library Marketing & Outreach Interest Group – Greater NYC Area – is looking for lightning round presentations for our Spring 2016 meeting!

Do you have an interesting marketing project to share from your academic library? Did you create a great giveaway, social media campaign, or contest? We want to hear from you!

The lightning round talks will be a series of short (5-7 minute) presentations designed to maximize your opportunity to learn about outreach & marketing activities of your ACRL colleagues.

WhenFriday March 11, 2016, 3pm-5pm

 

Where: Berkeley College, Manhattan Campus, 3 East 43rd Street, 6th floor, room 603, New York, NY (2 minute walk from Grand Central Terminal)

 

Link to Google maphttps://www.google.com/maps/place/3+E+43rd+St,+New+York,+NY+10017

To submit a lightning round presentation, please submit this form by February 26, 2016

http://tinyurl.com/acrl-lmao-nyc-spring2016

About the ACRL LMaO Interest Group:

Launched at the 2014 ALA Annual Conference, this interest group encourages regional meet ups around the U.S. as a central initiative. The ACRL National Library Marketing and Outreach Interest Group has been created for Academic Librarians interested in Marketing and Outreach. This group is open to ACRL National members & non-members. For more information, please see our Facebook presence at https://www.facebook.com/groups/acrl.lmao

Open to all members & non-members of ACRL national.

 

Please RSVP by March 4, 2016 (RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/acrl-lmao-nyc-spring2016-RSVPso your names can be given to security at the entrance of the building.

 

Creative Approaches to Instructional Design in Libraries: Moving from Theory to Practical Application

We’re excited to invite you to submit chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL book, Creative Approaches to Instructional Design in Libraries: Moving from Theory to Practical Application.

 

Focus of the Book:

Libraries increasingly emphasize innovative services that connect patrons to information. Given these changes, instructional design (ID) is becoming an important concept in librarians’ day-to-day activities. Unique, library-specific challenges call for creative ideas that are grounded in solid research and theory. Applying the theory to your institution or circumstance is often challenging. This book will attempt to break down librarians’ preconceptions of what ID is and inspire them to implement ID in creative ways.

 

There are many variations in how different sectors understand and apply the concept of instructional design.For purposes of this book, we define it as intentional, sound instructional or programmatic creation, delivery, and assessment that takes into account the audience, course/program context, and shared learning goals.

 

Book Structure:

This book will have three main sections – Information Literacy InstructionProgramming and Outreach, and Online Initiatives.

 

We welcome chapters that focus on practical and creative approaches to ID implementation. What problem were you trying to solve? What ideas did you generate to solve that problem? Who was involved? What was the result? How can the ideas be adapted beyond your library situation?

 

Supporting ID theory and models can supplement your ideas, but should not be the focus of your proposed chapter.

 

Proposals will be considered in any of the following categories within one of the three main sections (Information Literacy Instruction, Programming and Outreach, and Online Initiatives):

Suggested subtopics include:

  • Intentional planning using ID principles (e.g., lesson planning, designing targeted programs, moving from face-to-face to online instruction)
  • Collaboration with faculty, staff, and other on-campus support services
  • Assessment planning using ID principles
  • Obstacles and creative solutions to ID issues

Don’t see your topic here? Contact the editors at CreativeIDBook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

 

Proposal Guidelines:

A short form with an attached Word document (.doc or .docx) is required for proposal submission. The Word document should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

 

  • A working title
  • Names of all contributing authors & their respective institutions
  • Contact information for the primary author
  • A paragraph describing the proposed chapter
  • One final sentence that explains how your idea can be adapted beyond your library setting 

Proposals are due by Friday, February 5, 2016, and can be submitted to https://form.jotform.com/53554577686169

 

  • Contributors will be notified of their status (acceptance or rejection) by February 23, 2016
  • Deadline to submit the first draft of accepted chapters: April 1, 2016
  • Estimated length of chapter: 2,500–4000 words
  • Projected publication date: September 2016

ACRL Publications Agreement FAQ: http://www.ala.org/acrl/publications/publicationsfaq