Category Archives: ACRL

ACRL 2019 Lightening Talks

Inspire others with quick glimpses at your latest innovations, interesting ideas, and new technologies or services. The sky is the limit! Each five-minute Lightning Talk will require you to create a maximum of 20 slides that advance automatically every 15 seconds. Submit your 150-word proposal by Wednesday, January 16, 2019. It’s that quick and easy! The top proposals will be chosen by the ACRL 2019 Innovations Committee. Winners will be determined by popular vote.

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section 2019 Research Poster Session

The Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) invites proposals for the 2019 WGSS Research Poster Session, to be held as part of the ALA Annual Conference General Poster Session, located in the exhibits hall at the Washington, D.C. Convention Center. The WGSS has a dedicated time from 11:30-1:00 on SaturdayJune 22nd for our posters to be displayed and discussed. We would also like those who are able and willing to present their posters at the WGSS General Membership Meeting at 4:30 the same day, to encourage maximum feedback.

The potential scope of the topics includes, but is not limited to, teaching partnerships, critical information literacy initiatives, critical cataloging, archival practices, collection development, and scholarly communications related to women and gender studies. Topics dealing with feminism and librarianship are also welcome. For research ideas, see the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

The deadline for submitting an application is Friday, February 8, 2019. Following a double-blind peer-review process, applicants will be notified in late March if their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. Start your application process now at https://www.conferenceabstracts.com/cfp2/login.asp?EventKey=EFRAOCJH . You must login to the site using your ALA username and password, or you can create a username and password for the site before you submit your application.

ACRL Instruction Section Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum (2019 ALA Midwinter)

The IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum is an excellent opportunity for instruction librarians to explore and discuss topics related to library instruction and information literacy. The steering committee welcomes proposals from individuals who are interested in convening this discussion online in advance of the 2019 ALA Midwinter Meeting: Thursday, January 17, at 2 PM EST/11 AM PST.

If you would like to share your knowledge, help your peers learn from one another, and spark a lively conversation, submit a proposal to lead the IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum today.

Application Deadline: September 28, 2018.

To submit a proposal, please use the online submission form.

Applicants will be notified by October 31, 2018.

To see examples of past discussion topics, view the digests of past discussions online.

Questions?

Contact the ACRL IS Discussion Group Steering Committee Chair, Lauren Hays (ldhays@mnu.edu) or Vice-Chair, Melissa Harden (mharden@nd.edu).

ACRL DVC Fall 2018 Program

When: October 26, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Where: Drexel University’s Learning Terrace

Theme:  Librarians as Advocates:  Leading Activism on Your Campus and Beyond

This program seeks to provide insight into the activism and advocacy work being done in libraries in higher education across the Delaware Valley region. In times of inequity, discrimination, and social injustice, libraries have the opportunity to be institutions of resistance, understanding, and hope. We are bringing together librarians who would like to share how they have incorporated democracy, equity, intellectual freedom, and privacy into their projects and collaborations to advocate for their communities.  Successful proposals will demonstrate an analysis of the underlying power structures that motivate their efforts. Whether your advocacy work takes the form of outreach projects, pedagogical techniques, systems or application development, cataloging practice, or collaborative projects, we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work and its impact with colleagues.

Topics should be related to library leadership in social change including:

  • Services for students with marginalized identities, including documentation status
  • Poverty, food insecurity, or homelessness
  • Voter registration and electoral issues
  • Social, mental, and health-related services
  • Access and textbook-related services
  • Library-related legislation
  • Privacy
  • Diversity, inclusion, and equity
  • Workplace fairness and rights issues

The deadline to submit is September 10 with notification by September 15, 2018.

Submission Information

Proposals must include the following information:

  1. Proposal title
  2. Names, affiliations, positions, and email addresses of the presenters
  3. Preferred presentation format
    1. Option A – 10-minute lightning round presentation only
    2. Option B – 10-minute lightning round presentation and roundtable facilitation.
  4. A 250-word summary of the topic you wish to present including the points you intend to make and the way(s) you intend to engage the audience, if applicable

To propose a session please visit: https://goo.gl/forms/ZOls6D1Xker3b1o83

Questions? E-mail Jess Denke at jessicadenke@muhlenberg.edu

ACRL 2019 Conference Scholarships

ACRL is offering a number of scholarships for those who wish to attend the 2019 ACRL Conference in Cleveland. There are several categories of scholarships including one for support staff.  Applications are due October 5, 2018. For more information go to

https://conference.acrl.org/scholarships/

OK-ACRL

OK-ACRL is now accepting proposals for posters and presentations for this year’s conference.

We have two great keynote speakers:

·       Dr. Stephanie Mikitish (Rutgers University) will discuss the use of the literature analysis dashboard and essential areas to research.

·       Dr. Lili Luo (San Jose State University) will focus on evidence-based library and information practice.

Presentations:

As our speakers set the scene, we ask you, our fellow librarians, to share your ideas on evidence-based library practice, as well as current research in which your library or librarians are involved.  Presentations should be 45 minutes in length. 15 additional minutes will be allotted for questions after the presentation.  Presenters receive free registration.

Posters (New as well as Recycled):

All new poster ideas are, of course, welcome, but we are also accepting posters that you may have already presented at regional or national conferences in the past year.  We know you put a lot of hard work into your posters, so please share them with the rest of OK-ACRL.  Poster presenters receive a $15 discount on registration.

Posters will be displayed in a come-and-go area for the duration of the conference. Easels for posters will be provided by OK-ACRL.

Please submit your proposals by September 14th, 2018.

https://goo.gl/forms/qRycxPWLsAzOCp7P2

Value of Academic Libraries Travel Scholarships

VAL Call for Proposals

 

For more info go to http://www.ala.org/acrl/awards/researchawards/valtravel

The Association of College and Research Libraries is offering travel scholarships of up to $2,000 each for librarians presenting on their work demonstrating the impact of academic libraries in the broader landscape of higher education. This program is one of several developed by ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries (VAL) Committee to support librarians in their efforts to communicate to our partners in higher education including administrators, scholars, and teachers working in all disciplines. These travel scholarships support the community in taking up a recommendation from the ACRL report Academic Library Impact: Improving Practice and Essential Areas to Research (prepared by OCLC Research and released in September 2017 for download or purchase) that academic librarians effectively communicate their contributions both up to institutional stakeholders and out to other departments.

ACRL invites applications from those seeking to present work on the impact of academic libraries at higher education conferences or disciplinary conferences where they will reach a wide audience (scholarships will not be awarded for travel to library conferences). The presentations may be based on practice-based work or formal research projects.

To have the greatest possible effect, the committee seeks strong applicants who bring a range of perspectives in terms of types of institutions, geographical regions, and nature of the work presented.

The conference must take place between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019. Reimbursable expenses include conference registration, lodging, travel (round-trip economy airfare, train ticket, or mileage), and meals (up to $50 per diem). The applicant should clearly outline estimated expenses in the budget.

Eligibility

Each applicant must be a member of ACRL and employed as a librarian or information professional in an academic or research library in the year prior to application for the travel scholarship.

The applicant must have submitted a proposal to the conference where he/she wishes to present at the time of application. Granting of the scholarship is conditional upon the proposal being accepted by that conference.

Criteria

The purpose of the travel scholarships is to support communication about the significance of libraries to other stakeholders in higher education. The presentation may be based on past or current initiatives. A subcommittee of member leaders from the Value of Academic Libraries Committee will review proposals with the following criteria in mind:

  • How well does the proposed presentation align with the Value of Academic Library goals and objectives as stated in ACRL’s strategic plan?
    • The proposal should explicitly state how it supports the VAL objectives in the strategic plan.
  • Does the topic align with current interests and trends in higher education and libraries?
    • The proposal should identify current trends – in scholarship and/or practice – and how the work being presented advances those trends.
  • Is the proposed presentation clear and intriguing? Does it investigate or provide new ways of thinking about the impact of academic libraries? Are the ideas well-conceived, developed, and articulated?
    • The proposal should clearly outline its purpose and outcomes, as well as appropriate methodology utilized. If the project/research on which this presentation is based has not yet been completed, a timeline for completion should be outlined.
  • Is the need for funding strongly articulated and demonstrated?
    • The budget should be clearly outlined, along with discussion of any alternative or additional sources of funding.
  • Is the reason for presenting this project at the stated conference compelling? Does it fit closely with stakeholder interests? Why is the presentation format chosen appropriate?
    • The proposal should consider the primary audience of the conference and how the presentation will engage them.

Application Instructions

The application cover sheet is available to download here. Please fill it out, save it, and combine it into a single PDF with the other application documents detailed below.

Your application should include:

  1. A completed cover sheet
  2. Conference abstract (maximum 2 pages)
    1. Include the abstract/proposal you submitted to the conference, which should clearly outline the purpose, methodology, and outcomes of the project on which this presentation is based.
  3. Scholarship proposal (maximum 2 pages)
    1. Address how this presentation will contribute to ACRL’s Value of Academic Libraries initiative and strategic plan.
    2. The proposal should clearly state why this specific conference is a good place to present based on supporting evidence such as the primary audience and what sort of institutional stakeholders they represent (e.g. administrators, faculty, educational researchers, etc.). Also address the presentation format and why it’s suitable for highlighting the value of academic libraries.
    3. If you collaborated on this project with others, please briefly explain the role of the different members of the project team.
  4. Estimated budget (maximum 2 pages using the budget worksheet provided)
    1. If you stated that you have other funds available from your institution or another source of support to travel to this conference, please explain briefly what this funding supports and why you are seeking an ACRL travel scholarship in addition to it.
    2. Provide an itemized budget with a list of anticipated expenses totaling no more than $2000. Reimbursable expenses include conference registration, lodging, travel (round-trip economy airfare, train ticket, or mileage), and meals (up to $50 per diem).
  5. Your CV or résumé
  6. Statement of institutional support (maximum 1 page)
    1. This should be written by your supervisor, department head, library director, provost, etc. to indicate that they support travel to the conference as part of your professional development and, if applicable, will provide other funds to supplement this scholarship. It does not need to be on letterhead or signed, but should have the statement author’s name, job title, email address, and phone number.

Application Deadlines

The deadline to submit your completed Value of Academic Libraries Travel Scholarship Application for the current round of awards is 5 p.m. Central Time on Friday, August 31, 2018. Applicants will receive notice of the status of their travel scholarship applications by October 19, 2018.

The deadline for the next round will be February 15, 2019 and those applicants will receive notice by April 1. Both of these rounds of applications apply to travel between September 1, 2018 and August 31, 2019.

Electronic submissions are required. Email a single PDF file of all required documents to Sara Goek, sgoek@ala.org.

Obligations

Award recipients must:

  1. Submit a claim for reimbursable expenses – not exceeding the proposed costs – by Aug. 31, 2019. Include the reimbursement request form and all required documentation.
  2. Acknowledge in their conference presentation that they received ACRL funding.
  3. Provide ACRL staff with a copy of their conference presentation and a brief textual description (abstract) which ACRL may disseminate online, for example as part of a blog post or other update to the community.

Further Information

See the application frequently asked questions for more details about applying.

If your questions are not answered on the website, please contact ACRL Program Manager and Mellon/ACLS Public Fellow Sara Goek at: sgoek@ala.org or 312-280-5841.

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook

Dear colleagues,

Please consider submitting a chapter proposal to the forthcoming book The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook (to be published with ACRL Publications in 2019). Below is a more detailed description of the topic. Proposals are due July 16th. The call is also available at https://bit.ly/2JNtqNY. And please pardon any cross-posting!

 

Thank you for considering a contribution!

Sarah Morris

 

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We’re looking for lesson plans or projects that support early college students in developing their critical thinking skills, with a particular focus on critical thinking about sources (ACRL Publications). We are seeking informative and approachable plans that librarians can implement to support undergraduate students in developing vital critical thinking skills that can help them succeed in college and beyond. Ensuring that students can not only identify different types of sources, but can also delve more deeply into how and why different types of sources are produced, can be a way to empower students with the skills they need to find, evaluate, and use information for a variety of purposes, in college and beyond.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the Cookbook format. Your 600-800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity that supports undergraduate students in developing skills to help them think critically about sources. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

 

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to acrlcritsources@gmail.com by July 16, 2018

Notifications will be sent out in August 2018

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2018

Cookbook categories:

Section I: Consuming Information

Recipes here will concentrate on identifying and evaluating different types of information with a focus on popular vs. scholarly sources, evaluating information, and recognizing and dealing with misinformation.

Part I: Scholarly Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying scholarly sources
  • Peer review
  • Searching for scholarly sources
  • Understanding the scholarly publishing process

Part II: Popular Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying popular sources
  • Understanding how different popular sources are published
  • Distinguishing between popular and scholarly sources

Part III: Evaluating Sources

Examples include:

  • Revamping the CRAAP test
  • Tools, resources, and activities to help students evaluate sources
  • Games for evaluating sources
  • Detecting and understanding bias

Part IV: Misinformation

Examples include:

  • Fact checking activities
  • Understanding what misinformation is and what forms it can take
  • Recognizing misinformation
  • Strategies for reading and consuming information online

Section II: Producing and Distributing Information

Recipes here will concentrate on helping students better understand how and why different types of sources are produced and how they can produce and use information. Recipes will focus on technology and tools, production and distribution techniques, and 21st century information ecosystems.

Part I: Means of Production

Examples include:

  • Synthesizing sources
  • Remixing sources
  • Producing content for specific audiences

Part II: Technology and Tools

Examples include:

  • Evaluating infographics
  • Creating infographics
  • Working with data
  • Working with social media tools

Part III: Information Distribution

  • Mapping activities to explore how different types of information are presented and interpreted in different forms of media
  • Visualizing information
  • Exploring algorithms

Part IV: 21st Century Information Ecosystems

Examples include:

  • Exploring funding models for different types of information and information outlets
  • Exploring advertising
  • Exploring the role of social media

Email acrlcritsources@gmail.com with any questions. Please refer to The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009), The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), and The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Sarah Morris, Learning and Assessment Librarian, University of Texas at Austin

 

 

ACRL Science and Technology Section Annual Research Forum and Poster sessions

The Research Committee of the ACRL Science and Technology Section is hosting
its Annual Research Forum (Sunday, June 24, 2018) and Poster Session (Sunday,
June 24, 2018) at the 2018 American Library Association Annual Conference in
New Orleans.

The Research Forum and Poster Session provide an excellent opportunity to
share a wide range of research projects relevant to science and technology
librarianship.

Submissions for the paper and poster presentations are selected based on the
quality of the abstract and the demonstration of significant progress toward
completing the research project by June 2018.  Your submission should include:
-brief background information about your project,
-the research question or problem that drove your project,
-the methods used,
-your findings and a brief discussion that includes the impact of your
project.

Your proposal should total no more than 250 words. Because this is a blind
review process, be sure to include your name, institution, phone, and email
addresses of all participants (not part of word count) separate from your
abstract (the form has separate fields for these items).

Please submit your proposal via this form: goo.gl/LqfEbV

Submission Categories:
Research Forum Featured Paper Presentation.  The Featured Paper Presentation
is 20 minutes in length and will be followed by a thoughtful 10-minute
critique from a guest commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to
prepare the paper for publication.  Proposals should reflect research that has
been completed or initiatives that have already been implemented. At a
minimum, significant progress should have been made toward completion or
implementation.
Research Forum Short Paper Presentations.  Short Papers are 10 minutes in
length and will be followed by a thoughtful 5-minute critique from a guest
commentator, who will offer suggestions on how to prepare the paper for
publication or generate additional ideas that will move the paper forward.
Proposals should reflect research or initiatives that have been completed or
are currently in progress.
Poster Presentations.  Posters should cover research endeavors or practitioner
projects that enhance science and technology librarianship.  Proposals should
provide useful and practical findings, and describe opportunities for
discussion with participants.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION OF ABSTRACTS: Friday, February 23, 2018.  Submissions
are selected by the STS Research Committee. The Committee adheres to mentoring
principles and a “blind” review process to select proposals. We strongly
encourage you to remove any identifying information in your proposal prior to
submission; otherwise, the STS Research Committee co-chairs will take
responsibility for removing identifying information, which may unintentionally
alter the text of your submission.

Acceptance of proposals reflects a commitment by the author(s) to present at
the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans. Travel support from STS is not
available. Specific logistical details will follow upon acceptance.  Please
submit your proposal via this form: goo.gl/LqfEbV

If you have any questions, please ask the STS Research Committee co-chairs:
Amy Van Epps, amy_vanepps@harvard.edu
Hannah Gascho Rempel, hannah.rempel@oregonstate.edu

Failing Forward: Experimentation and Creativity in Libraries

2018 ACRL New England Chapter Annual Conference

Friday, May 4, 2018

Hotel 1620 Plymouth Harbor

Plymouth, Massachusetts

https://acrlnec.org/annual-conference/call-for-proposals

#acrlnec18

We often talk at conferences about projects that went well. In contrast, we rarely discuss initiatives that failed, or unexpected obstacles that forced us to find another route to success. In our 2018 Annual Conference, the ACRL New England chapter is highlighting experimentation and creativity in college and research libraries by acknowledging that missteps and roadblocks are all part of the process. Join us in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in May 2018 to talk about “failing forward.”

We want to hear about your innovative ideas that went bust; your project development blunders; your event planning faux pas! Tell us how failure has helped you and your library to learn and grow. Give us insight into the missteps that have led you to unanticipated success. How has expanding your capacity for failure helped you to take risks and experience breakthroughs?

 

Staff, faculty, administrators, and students in all areas of librarianship are encouraged to submit proposals by January 19, 2018.

 

See the full call for proposals, including session formats, submission requirements, and the link to submit a proposal, on the conference website: https://acrlnec.org/annual-conference/call-for-proposals

Questions? Email the 2018 Conference Planning Committee at acrlnec2018@gmail.com.