Category Archives: Administration

PaLA Conference Poster Sessions

October 15 – 18, 2017
DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh – GreenTree
We hope you will plan to attend the Pennsylvania Library Association Annual Conference to take place at the DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh–Greentree, located in a Pittsburgh suburb with close proximity to city attractions.  The PaLA Conference offers numerous ways to further your career with innovative educational programming and opportunities to network with your peers in the library community. 

Poster sessions provide an informal forum for library professionals from across the state to share their successful program ideas or innovations with colleagues. An effective poster presentation highlights, with visual display, the main points or components of your topic; the presenter fills in the details verbally and answers questions from those viewing the poster. The object is to gather feedback and to make connections with others interested in the same subject. If you have an idea for a program or study that you’d like to share, we invite you to present a poster!

The deadline for submission of poster proposals is Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

For more information about the conference, and to access the link to the session proposal form, visit the 2017 Conference Information Page.

Thank you in advance to all that submit proposals, we appreciate your dedication to PaLA and to Pennsylvania’s libraries!

International Journal of Library and Information Services

CALL FOR PAPERS

Interim Editor-in-Chief: Mehdi Khosrow-Pour

 Published by IGI Global: www.igi-global.com

 

 http://www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-library-information-services/177099

Invitation

The International Journal of Library and Information Services (IJLIS) invites you to submit a research article that contributes to the overall comprehensive coverage on the latest developments and technological advancements in library service innovation. Public, academic, special, and school libraries, as well as information centers worldwide are continuously challenged as library spaces evolve. IJLIS faces these challenges head on by offering innovative methods for developing an effective organizational structure, optimizing library space use, and implementing programs designed to improve user experience and engagement.

 

Mission

The mission of the International Journal of Library and Information Services (IJLIS) is to disseminate emerging research in library service innovation, and provide a venue for librarians, researchers, professionals, vendors, and academics to interact and exchange ideas. The journal addresses a variety of technologies, scholarly perspectives, and applications in the field.

 

Coverage

  • Administration and management
  • Building design
  • Conceptual models
  • Creative programming
  • Customer involvement
  • Digital Tools
  • Disruptive innovation
  • Information retrieval
  • Knowledge Management
  • Learning space toolkits
  • Literacy programs
  • Metadata creation and management
  • Money-saving initiatives
  • New product development
  • Organizational structures
  • Service development
  • Service-dominant logic
  • Technology adoption

 

Submission

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit their original empirical research articles 3,000–8,000 words in length. Interested authors must consult the journal’s guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted articles will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis by no fewer than 3 members of the journal’s Editorial Review Board and 1 Associate Editor. Final decision regarding acceptance/revision/rejection will be based on the reviews received from the reviewers and at the sole discretion of the Editor-in-Chief.

 

All manuscripts must be submitted through the E-Editorial Discovery™ online submission manager. Please see the link at the bottom of this page.

 

Inquiries can be forwarded to IJLIS@igi-global.com.

 

http://www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-library-information-services/177099

 

 

 

2017 Leadership in Higher Education Conference

October 19-21, 2017 in Baltimore, Md

For more information go to http://www.magnapubs.com/2017-leadership-in-higher-education-conference/call-for-proposals.html?utm_campaign=LHE+2017-+Leadership+in+Higher+Education+Conference&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=40774756&_hsenc=p2ANqtz–SlSnoZIBiAdihFfzdD_pttjhEjjG1bNjNOtuq34JN1nTcfz1U2msWaliwxcOmGH4elw4v3Z9WyRRD34_K3dbJOe6a5g&_hsmi=40774756

If you serve in a leadership role on campus, here’s your chance to get involved in a conference developed just for academic leaders.

Brought to you by Magna Publications, producers of Academic Leadernewsletter and the Teaching Professor Conference, the Leadership in Higher Education Conference is accepting speaking proposals for its 2nd annual conference, Oct. 19–21 in Baltimore.

As a session presenter, you’ll make a meaningful contribution to this dynamic and interactive conference. You’ll extend you own network and grow professionally. You’ll help other academic leaders examine the challenges, issues, and trends affecting management in higher education today—and return to campus with an invigorated outlook and an actionable plan for change.

Submitting a proposal is easy.  Areas of interest include the following tracks; however compelling and relevant proposals that fall outside of these designated topics are also welcome:

Topical Area 1: Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

Topical Area 2: Leadership and Management

Topical Area 3: Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Topical Area 4: Faculty Hiring and Development

Topical Area 5: Issues and Trends in Higher Education

 

Featuring two-and-a-half intensive days of plenary sessions, preconference workshops, concurrent sessions, and roundtable discussions, the Leadership in Higher Education Conference provides insights to help academic leaders set direction, solve problems, and make a positive imprint on their campus.

This is your opportunity to share your expertise at a conference of your peers.

For more information about the proposal process and how to submit your proposal, please go here.

Submissions are due March 31, 2017.

Presenters are responsible for their own conference registration fee, travel, and lodging.

American Library Association’s Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) Webinars

Do you have a great idea for a webinar? Share your passions with the profession! The American Library Association’s Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) welcomes submissions of various topics for our future webinars.  We are especially interested in – but not limited to – areas related to Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach.

Criteria

Successful online webinar proposals should:
  • Name all presenters with relative teaching experience
  • Provide a 250 word description
  • Be aligned with the standards and competencies for diversity.
  • Show plans for presentations allotted for either 60 or 90 minutes.
  •  Clearly outlines learning outcomes for the ODLOS target audience.
  •  Illustrate how the webinar will address a topic of interest for ODLOS.

Topics

Diversity
  • Advocacy
    • Valuing Diversity
    •  Recruitment for Diversity
  • Race
  • Micro-aggressions and Inclusion
  •  LGBT and Gender
  •  Feminism/combating sexism
  • Disability
  • Cultural Competency
    • Intercultural communications
  •  Class
    • Social- economic justice
    • Equity
Literacy
  • Family Literacy
    •  Literacy Across A Lifespan
  •  Adult Education
    •  Employment Recruitment
    •  Employment Services
  •  English Language Learning
    •  Citizenship and Immigration
Outreach
  • Community Organizing and Peace Building
  • Organizational and Institutional Change
  •  Recruitment and Retention
  • Serving Traditionally Underserved Populations

Submission Form

To submit a proposal, complete the online submissions form.

Contact

ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services
50 E. Huron St.
Chicago, Illinois 60611
1-800-545-2433 ext. 4294
Fax: 312-280-3256
Email: diversity@ala.org

The Future of Librarianship: Exploring what’s next for the Academic Librarian: LACUNY Institute 2017

Call for Proposals
Date: May 19, 2017
Location: LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York
Keynote Speaker: Barbara Rockenbach, Associate University Librarian for Collections and Services (interim), at Columbia University Libraries
Submission Deadline: February 1, 2017
Librarians cannot predict the future but they can speculate about it. . .
The LACUNY Institute 2017 is seeking futuristic proposals that think beyond the current to share a vision of the academic librarians’ position in a changing information landscape.
The LACUNY Institute Committee seeks proposals that address the future of academic librarians in college and university libraries, archives, and the information studies, across myriad roles (staff, faculty, students, patrons, etc.) and functions (technical services, public services, instruction, etc.). Such proposals can deal with innovation already in practice and/or futuristic ideas concerning librarianship.
Example topics include but are not limited to:
  *   Impact of current events on library trends
  *   Innovation and changes in roles, responsibilities, services and resources
  *   Impact of technology
  *   Leadership, leadership development, and workforce planning
  *   Diversity & inclusion,
  *   Career planning, professional development
  *   Post-truth information literacy, digital literacy, and visual literacy
  *   MLS, Curriculum development, and preparedness
  *   Civic engagement, partnerships, and community building
  *   Librarians as knowledge gatekeepers, personal freedom, and privacy
The Institute will have four tracks: panel presentations, facilitated dialogues, and alt-sessions.
  *   Panel papers (15 minutes/presenter): Moderated panel presentations with time for questions and discussion.
  *   Facilitated dialogues (45 minutes): Teams of two lead a discussion on topic of their choice related to the theme, with one person presenting context and the other facilitating conversation.
  *   Alt-sessions (15-30 minutes): An opportunity for exploring topics through multiple ways of knowing (e.g., short documentary, spoken word, performance art).
  *   Poster sessions
Please submit proposals, including a 300-500 word abstract by February 1, 2017
The goal of this event is to create a space for respectful dialogue and debate about these critical issues. We will be publishing a formal code of conduct, but the event organizers will actively strive to create a public space in which multiple perspectives can be heard and no one voice dominates.

Questions may be directed to the 2017 LACUNY Institute Co-Chairs Kimberley Bugg, kbugg@citytech.cuny.edu or Simone L. Yearwood at Simone.Yearwood@qc.cuny.edu

Leadership in Higher Education Conference

The Call for Proposals is now open.

Magna Publications and Academic Leader invite proposals for concurrent sessions for the 2017 Leadership in Higher Education Conference, October 19-21, 2017 in Baltimore, Md.

The Leadership in Higher Education Conference provides an opportunity for academic leaders to learn innovative strategies, trends, and best practices for effective management from nationally recognized experts and to network with like-minded peers from a wide range of academic institutions. Keynote and plenary speeches, concurrent interactive workshop sessions, and roundtable conversations foster a climate of learning and collaboration.

We seek interactive sessions that engage and inform attendees. Submissions should relate to one of the following areas; however compelling and relevant proposals that fall outside of these designated topics are also welcome:

1. Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

This track will give you all the tools you need to be a success:

  • Faculty evaluation basics
  • Managing a department or division
  • What you need to know about learning theory and pedagogy
  • Basic budgeting for a department and doing more with less
  • New Leadership: A successful first year for newly appointed deans or chairs

2. Leadership and Management

Learn effective management practices:

  • Facilitating a collegial department
  • Managing challenging faculty situations
  • Balancing faculty and administrative needs
  • Handling conflict

3. Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Assessment is very much on the minds of administrators, as states, accreditors, students, and parents all look for evidence of quality. Topics include:

  • Working with accreditors
  • Understanding trends in state assessment and compliance
  • Strategic planning for evaluation and assessment
  • Best practices in learning assessment

4. Faculty Hiring and Development

One of the most important jobs of an academic leader is to select the right new department members and provide faculty development opportunities, such as:

  • Conducting effective searches
  • Designing an effective faculty development program
  • Understanding the different needs of faculty who teach face-to-face, in hybrid classrooms, and online
  • Using technology and online delivery for faculty development
  • Managing promotion and tenure

5. Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Topics may include:

  • Financial
  • Legal/Regulatory
  • ADA or UDL compliance
  • Diversity
  • Effective budgeting

The deadline is March 31, 2017. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by June 2, 2017.

Learn more about the proposal process, including guidelines for writing a strong proposal

To see what information we’re requesting in the proposal, look here

When you’re ready, please submit your proposal using our online form located here

Questions regarding the submission process should be directed to MaryAnn Mlekush, conference manager, at mmlekush@magnapubs.com, or 608-227-8138. Presenters are responsible for their own conference registration fee, travel, and lodging.

All submissions go through a blind, peer-review process by our advisory board. Members use the following rubric to evaluate proposals:

Book Chapter Proposals in Library Assessment

Call for Book Chapter Proposals in Library Assessment  (Apologies for cross-posting)

We are seeking chapter proposals for a book on library assessment. Please consider sharing your work in this area to this effort.

Working Title – Academic Libraries and the Academy: Strategies and Approaches to Demonstrate Your Value, Impact, and Return on Investment

Publisher

This book will be published under the auspices of ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries). The anticipated publication date is early 2018.

Introduction

Assessment in academic libraries will play an increasingly crucial role in higher education. With the demand for greater transparency and accountability in funding for institutions, diminished budgets, and a shift to performance-based funding, academic libraries are examining and implementing new and creative approaches to demonstrate their inherent, immediate and long term value and impact to their institutions and stakeholders. Academic libraries of all shapes and sizes are understanding the need to establish their place and role in supporting institutional goals and objectives particularly related to student learning outcomes, academic student success measures, and faculty teaching and research productivity. To this end, many academic libraries are investing in efforts focused on implementing assessment initiatives that demonstrate their value and impact to their institutional stakeholders and community.

Objective

This book will present cases of how academic libraries are successfully implementing initiatives to demonstrate their worth and value to their institutional and community stakeholders. The cases will include proven strategies, lessons learned, effective approaches and practical applications successfully employed by academic staff and support professionals. The publication is intended to inform those at all levels of experience and stages of implementation— that is, those who are considering or just beginning to embark on this path, as well as others who have already taken the plunge and are looking to leverage or triangulate other strategies.

Target Audience

This publication will primarily target librarians, professional staff and administrators at all types of academic libraries, and we anticipate it will also be of interest to others across disciplines and industries who are engaged in similar assessment initiatives. It will present practical, easy-to-adopt strategies and approaches based on case studies, and will offer a breadth and depth of options to appeal to a wide range of readers at various stages of experience with demonstrating library value — from beginners to experts.

Proposed Book Sections

This book will be structured in four sections of case studies as described below:

Section 1: Seeding the Initiative. Explores the planning stages or “works-in-progress” in assessment that relate to the library’s impact and value. The results of these efforts may not be imminent. Nevertheless, these case studies demonstrate the potential value and the importance of the initial design and planning stage.

Section 2: Low-Hanging Fruit.  Provides stories of assessments that are easy to measure, short-term (less than one year), low cost, require few resources (staff or tools), and are easily replicable at similar academic libraries.

Example: ROI spreadsheets at the University of West Florida

Section 3: Reachable Fruit (with some effort).  Provides stories of assessments that may require more external and internal resources to measure, may take more than six months to one year to collect and analyze, feature medium costs and resources (i.e., incentives, equipment, tools), and may be replicable at other academic libraries that are similar in size or scope.

Example: Contingent valuation measures

Section 4: Hard-to-Reach Fruit. A range of assessment activities more difficult to measure and time and resource intensive, may require long-term data collection (e.g. longitudinal studies that require more than a year to collect a dataset or have measures that require more time, such as measuring a cohort’s graduation rates), and feature greater external partnerships, internal infrastructure, and/or additional resources to measure and analyze.

Examples: The Library Cube (which required the creation of a relational database), and Mixed-method Ethnographies, such as the ERIAL Project. (Ethnographic qualitative studies require more time to transcribe and analyze.)

Chapter proposals should focus on a topic that is related to one of the four sections listed above. Authors are also welcome to propose additional topics or sections that may be relevant to this publication.

Submission Procedure

Authors are invited to submit a chapter proposal as an email attachment in Word or PDF to academiclibrariesandtheacademy@gmail.com on or before Monday, January 09, 2017. The chapter proposal should be 300-500 words clearly explaining the intent and details of the proposed chapter as it relates to one of the four sections of the book described above. Authors will be notified by Monday, February 27, 2017 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Completed chapters are expected to be between 3,000-5,000 words, although shorter or longer chapters are negotiable. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by Tuesday, May 29, 2017.

Proposals should include:

  • Author name(s), institutional or organizational affiliation, job title/role
  • Brief author(s) bio
  • Proposed chapter title
  • A summary of the proposed chapter (300-500 words)

Proposed chapters should be based on unpublished work, unique to this publication and not submitted or intended to be simultaneously submitted elsewhere.

Important Dates

Book Chapter Proposals Submission Due: Monday, January 09, 2017 Authors notified: Monday, February 27, 2017  Abstracts/Full Chapters Due: Tuesday, May 29, 2017  Feedback and revisions to Authors: Summer, 2017

Final Revised Chapter Due: September, 2017  Copy-editing, production: Fall, 2017

Publication Date: Early 2018

Inquiries to: academiclibrariesandtheacademy@gmail.com

Editors

Marwin Britto, Ph.D., MLIS

University of Saskatchewan

Canada

Kirsten Kinsley, Ed.S., MLIS

Florida State University

USA

2017 ACRL-NEC Annual Conference

The Association of College and Research Libraries, New England Chapter (http://www.acrlnec.org/)
invites you to submit a proposal to present at the 2017 ACRL-NEC Annual Conference
Reframing Librarianship in the 21st Century
Friday, May 12 @University of Vermont Conference Center, Burlington, VT.  
It is an era of reinvention for college and research libraries. Whether we work in cataloging and metadata, scholarly communication, archives, public services, instruction, or another area of librarianship, we have all heard a rhetoric of crisis, transformation, and rapid change applied to our work. The challenges we face have provided an opportunity to refocus on the foundations of our profession: our purpose and our areas of expertise. In reflecting on and redefining our work and ourselves, we are reframing librarianship for the 21st Century. This exciting topic will be kicked off by keynote Suzanne Wones, Director of Library Digital Strategies and Innovations at Harvard Library.
The Program Committee is interested in receiving proposals for presentations, panel discussions, workshops, and posters that speak to the following questions:
  • In this era of reinvention, how are we reframing ourselves, the work that we do, and our libraries?
  • How are we communicating around this shift within our institutions and beyond?

 

Topics might include, but are not limited to, the reframing of:
  • Our professional identities and roles within the library, on campus, and in society
  • The development and provision of library and archives collections to users
  • Cataloging and metadata practices
  • Efforts around diversity and inclusion in our profession and on our campuses
  • LIS education: Are we graduating technologically- and information-literate librarians?
  • Professional development, collaboration, training, and supervision
  • Research and publication in library and information science
  • Education and advocacy on issues of scholarly communication, copyright, and licensing
  • Public services: liaison, instruction, and reference work
  • Data services and the library’s role in research data management, data education, and open data
  • Assessment, and our role in broader institutional efforts around student success and retention, accreditation, and learning outcomes
  • The institutional context of the academic library, including institutional structures, cross-departmental collaborations, and faculty status issues

 

Staff, faculty, administrators, and students in all areas of librarianship are encouraged to submit proposals. 
To submit a proposal, follow this link: https://goo.gl/forms/DhpZH2UCJYCdXpeH2
The deadline for proposal submission is midnight on Dec 2, 2016.
Questions should be directed to the ACRL/NE CPC Programming Committee: 
acrlnec-cpc-prog-l@library.umass.edu

Advances in Library Administration and Organization Project Management in the Library Workplace

Publication due 2017

Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College

Volume Editor: Alice Daugherty, Louisiana State University Libraries

Many works have been published on ‘how to do project management’ in librarianship, but there are gaps in coverage of the deeper issues and surrounding processes. For example, what methods have been successfully used, in the library workplace, for assessing efficacy of project management?  What are the future trends and implications for library administration and management as formal project management schema become more commonplace in library work? How do these formal schemas demonstrably affect and improve library workplaces? For this forthcoming volume we welcome submissions that consider how project management affects library administration and that address the role of project management in the library workplace.

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:

  • Assessments of project management approaches
  • History of project management in library administration and future trends
  • Integration of project management processes and procedures within libraries
  • Efficacy of project management tools for library workplaces and projects
  • Project-related problem solving
  • Project participants and teambuilding
  • Project leadership in libraries
  • Project management education for library workers

This will be the second volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2017.

About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series

ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization.  The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues, in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot.  Through this series, practitioners can glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries.

How to submit

We are currently seeking proposals for the 2017 volume on project management in the library workplace.  If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send a proposal including author details and estimated length of final submission to Alice Daugherty at adaugher@lsu.edu by November 15, 2016.

Submission deadlines

 

Submission deadline for proposals: November 15, 2016

Notification of acceptance sent by:  December 15, 2016

Submission deadline for full chapters:  February 15, 2017

Comments returned to authors:  April 1, 2017

Submission deadline for chapter revisions:  May 1, 2017

ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Publication Series

The ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Committee invites you to submit a preliminary proposal for its CLIPP publication series. We welcome proposals on any topic that is relevant for small and midsized academic libraries. The CLIPP series allows library staff to share information on practices and procedures they have implemented to address common issues or concerns. Each CLIPP follows a set structure of three parts (literature review, survey results, and sample documents), and should both describe library best practices and provide useful, specific examples that libraries can refer to when developing similar policies and procedures of their own. 

Authors of a CLIPP publication are aided throughout by the CLIPP Committee and an assigned editor. CLIPP authors receive 10% of the royalties on the net revenues from their publication. For your reference, please find author instructions and more information about the CLIPP program at http://bit.ly/2bjTTDP.

CLIPP proposals are accepted throughout the year. The next preliminary proposal deadline is September 23, 2016. The CLIPP Committee will send out notifications regarding this round of submissions by October 3, 2016.

For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact:

Diana Symons

CLIPP Committee Chair

Email: dsymons@csbsju.edu  

Social Sciences Librarian

College of Saint Benedict/Saint John’s University