Category Archives: Digitization

ALCTS CaMMS Catalog Management Interest Group

The ALCTS CaMMS Catalog Management Interest Group seeks speakers to present at its meeting at the ALA Midwinter Meeting in Seattle, WA, January 26, 2019, 1:00-2:30 pm in the Madison Ballroom of the Renaissance Seattle Hotel.

The Catalog Management Interest Group discusses the various issues involved in
cataloging, classification, authority control, and metadata application after
the initial cataloging has been performed, including its impact on discovery.
It provides a forum for exchanging information and discussing techniques, new
developments, and problems with managing the data integrity of library
catalogs and related discovery tools.

Presentation topics might include, but are certainly not limited to:

*       Digitizing special collections
— in-house digitized materials into vendors e-book platforms or
broader
— providing or improving access to digitized collections
*       Processes of updating existing records to reflect digital versions
*       Transforming existing records for use in a digital repository type of
environment
*       Customizing collections to enhance customer experience
*       ILS audit and assessment
*       Tricks for managing data
*       Training tips and tools
*       Library data curation/analysis
*       Power of library data and linked data success stories

Please email proposals by November 26, 2018, to the Co-Chairs, Vesselina
Stoytcheva at Vesselina.Stoytcheva@occ.treas.gov and Jeanette Sewell at
jeanette.sewell@rice.edu. In your proposal, please include the following:

*       Presentation title
*       Abstract: 150-300 words
*       Amount of time needed to make the presentation
*       Name(s) and position(s) of presenter(s)
*       Email address(es) of presenter(s)

We look forward to hearing from you!

Jeanette Sewell, Co-Chair
Vesselina Stoytcheva, Co-Chair
Dan Tam Do, Vice Co-Chair
Marina Morgan, Vice Co-Chair

Digital Initiatives Symposium 2019

Please note changed proposal deadline: Friday, Dec. 14, 2018

Call for Proposals: Digital Initiatives Symposium 2019
The Digital Initiatives Symposium at the University of San Diego is accepting proposals for its full day conference on Tuesday, April 30, 2019. Proposals should fall into one of three formats:

  • Panel discussions: 60 minutes (please allow 10-15 minutes for Q&A)

  • Concurrent sessions: 45 minutes (please allow 10-15 minutes for Q&A)

  • Lightning talks: 10 minutes

We welcome proposals from organizations, including colleges and universities of all sizes, community colleges, public libraries, special libraries, museums, and other cultural memory institutions. This year, we are especially interested in proposals that consider:

  • linked data

  • social justice and open access

  • the future of open access

  • data management and sharing, open data

  • open educational resources

  • digital initiatives in instruction and undergraduate research

  • roles for deans and directors in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • roles for disciplinary faculty in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • diverse repository platforms and functions

  • digital humanities

  • copyright, licensing, and privacy issues

  • collaboration: interdisciplinary initiatives and collaboration within and between campuses

  • scholarly communication

  • technical applications related to platforms or tools

  • web archiving

  • web annotation

Submit your proposal at digital.sandiego.edu/symposium (Click on “Submit Proposal” on the left sidebar.) All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance thinking about digital initiatives, institutional repositories, and scholarly communication. Acceptance is competitive. Registration fees will be waived for accepted presenters.

Proposal deadline: Friday, Dec. 14, 2018

 

Designing for Digital

is returning and celebrating its fifth year in Austin, Texas on March 4-6, 2019.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS DUE NOV 30 2018:

http://designingfordigital.com/speaking-opportunities/

The D4D Program Planning committee has opened the 2019 Call for Proposals and is currently seeking 3-hour workshops, 90-minute seminars, 45-minute sessions and 20-minute short talks in tracks like: Tools & Methods, UX in Practice, Service & Physical Space Design,Trends, Emerging Issues, and the Future of Design, Leadership & Organizational Strategies. For a detailed list of the topics covered at D4D: http://designingfordigital.com/about/tracks/

OPENING KEYNOTE BY BRAD FROST

We are pleased to announce Brad Frost will be opening our conference on Monday, March 4th. Brad Frost is a web designer, speaker, trainer, consultant, writer, and musician located in Pittsburgh, PA. He recently published Atomic Design, a book that introduces a methodology

for thinking of our UIs as thoughtful hierarchies, discusses the qualities of effective pattern libraries, and showcases techniques to transform team’s design  and development workflow.

WORKSHOPS: http://designingfordigital.com/2019-workshops/

We are curating an incredible program to celebrate our 5th annual conference with workshops presented by speakers from Slack and the Austin Center for Design.

REGISTER: http://designingfordigital.com/registration/

We’re looking forward to seeing you in Austin.

— Designing for Digital Planning Collaborators

ABOUT DESIGNING FOR DIGITAL

D4D is a design conference that aims to approach the library digital experience from a holistic point of view. We consider library services, physical layout, and overall strategy starting with a variety of users and use cases. The conference is meant to bring together UX professionals, web designers, managers, researchers, strategists and librarians of all types to examine the current user’s experience of the library and design the future of libraries in the modern, digital world.

ALCTS Metadata Interest Group Meeting on Metadata Automation – ALA Midwinter 2019

New technologies, collaborations, and ways of working have transformed metadata workflows. Have you implemented new tools to streamline your workflows? Are you experimenting with automated approaches to metadata creation? If so, we want to hear from you! Consider submitting your proposal for a 15 minute presentation at the ALCTS Metadata Interest Group session, followed by discussion.

Potential topics include:

  • Metadata automation workflows
  • Crowdsourcing metadata
  • Automated transcription
  • Automatic image recognition (e.g. facial/object recognition)

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Anne Washington (awashington@uh.edu) or Mingyan Li (mli5@uic.edu), ALCTS MIG Programming Co-Chairs.

Please fill out the submission form with your proposal abstract by Friday, November 16, 2018The Metadata Interest Group meeting will take place during the 2019 ALA Midwinter Conference in Seattle, WA on Sunday, January 27, 2019 8:30-10:00 am.

See this announcement on our blog: http://www.alcts.ala.org/metadatablog/2018/09/call-for-proposals-on-the-topic-of-linked-data-automation/

Realizing Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX

Please follow the link to a CFP for Realizing Resistance: An
Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX
<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdigital-frontiers.org%2Fresistance%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C13a3e0fc3e284b13a13408d612827336%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636716748819570671&amp;sdata=Uke47JHGUpbG9RDQioYx%2B3IxyPE0rNUSqLS7%2BW7FPPU%3D&amp;reserved=0>. Feminist, women’s studies,
critical race theory, and queer theory papers particularly welcome!

Sam Langsdale
UNT Philosophy & Religion

An Interdisciplinary Conference on *Star Wars*, Episodes VII, VIII & IX

May 2–4, 2019, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA

*Call for Papers:*

Although *Star Wars: Episode IV–A New Hope* may have started out on shaky
ground, its cinematic release in 1977 forever changed the landscape of
American pop culture. As Douglas Brode has argued, “*Star Wars*, simply
put, had turned out to be not merely the latest momentary blip on the
entertainment screen but an essential element of how we define ourselves
through the movies and related media” (2012, 7). Far from simply reflecting
a particular film genre, *Star Wars *has become a cultural phenomenon that
has impacted pop culture for over four decades.

Throughout the original trilogy, the prequels, and most recently the
sequels, the films have focused on the struggle between Imperial forces and
rebellious fighters who seek to throw off the yoke of an authoritarian
regime. In the opening crawl of *Episode VII–The Force Awakens*, we are
told that the Resistance, led by General Leia Organa, is fighting against
the First Order so that peace and justice may be restored to the galaxy.
This conference seeks to critically explore what it means to be “with the
Resistance” by focusing on Episodes VII, VIII, and (to the extent possible)
IX, as well as the various ways these films reflect, contribute to, or even
fail to show “how we define ourselves through the movies and related
media.” In other words, this conference aims to bring together scholars
from across disciplines to examine the three most recent *Star Wars* films
as cultural texts, with an explicit focus on themes of resistance and
justice, and on how these films contribute to, reflect, or depart from
broader contemporary cultural practices and social discourses.

[image: leia_poster]We are interested in, for example, the paradox inherent
in certain fan criticisms of *Episode VII–The Last Jedi* as “social justice
propaganda,” in light of the enduring theme of resistance and justice
throughout the film franchise. We seek to analyze what it means for *Star
Wars *slogans to be used on posters at contemporary political rallies, in
what ways, and by whom. We want to ask how Episodes VII, VIII & IX might be
productively used in a classroom to teach students about various concepts
of justice, or about histories of social resistance movements. We want to
pose critical questions about cultural appropriation and Orientalism in the
most recent films and throughout the franchise. We also want to explore
what limitations there may be in attempting to theorize about and practice
resistance to hegemonic power in relation to a film franchise owned by one
of the most powerful and successful corporations in our contemporary
capitalist economy.

Scholars may analyze any one of the three sequels, or some combination of
them. While we are aware that Episode IX will not be released until
December, we have included it here in order to give interested participants
the opportunity to reflect on trailers, the marketing in the lead-up to the
cinematic release, or even to include analysis of the film itself by the
time of the conference. Further, because the most recent films are part of
the larger franchise, we welcome (and would even expect) papers that put
Episodes VII, VIII & IX in dialogue with any other *Star Wars *films.
Finally, in addition to the films themselves, papers may engage with any
media related to the sequels including comics, animated series, SW fiction,
merchandise, advertising, or other types of social media.

And so, we invite all interested participants to join us in thinking about
the themes of resistance to hegemony, justice, and the restoration of peace
in Episodes VII, VIII & IX and how these films reflect, contribute to, or
depart from wider social discourses and cultural phenomena. In analyzing
“the Resistance,” in the films and beyond, paper proposals, in the form of
250-word abstracts, may address—but are not limited to—any of the following
topics:

– Generational differences or continuities
– Sexualities
– Models of friendship
– Human relationships with technology
– The role of the Environment/non-human animals/creatures
– The role of women
– The role of people of color
– The role of children/young people
– Ambiguity around “good guys” and “bad guys” in social conflicts
– Family/found family/lineage/heritage
– Class hierarchies
– Cultural appropriation and Orientalism
– Heroism through necessity
– Digital Scholarship and New Media Studies interventions
– The significance of names/naming
– The use of humor
– Clothing/fashion/color motifs
– Religion/belief/ritual
– Icons/symbols
– Hope
– Languages
– Teaching

As aca-fans it is our hope that this conference is both a celebration of
the films, and the broader culture engendered by the *Star Wars *franchise,
as well as an opportunity to engage in constructively critical analysis. We
welcome scholars from any discipline, employing any methodology, however in
the spirit of the conference theme, we request that all papers avoid
racism, sexism, ableism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, and religious
bigotry. Accepted participants will be invited to present their 20-minute
papers, or to exhibit their work, at a two-and-a-half-day interdisciplinary
conference at the University of North Texas in Denton. To submit a paper
proposal, please *submit this form
<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgoo.gl%2Fforms%2FEXVIyx74BaToVNyC3&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C13a3e0fc3e284b13a13408d612827336%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636716748819570671&amp;sdata=3K1WIJFncF%2BJX6p7DP2xVnSaR%2F1x1UEoBWoFnlZh67A%3D&amp;reserved=0>* with
the following information:

– Name, institutional affiliation, email address of corresponding author
and all co-authors (if applicable)
– 250-word abstract
– Short bio

*Dates and Deadlines*

Submission Deadline: November 15, 2018
Notifications: January 5, 2019
Conference Dates: May 2–4, 2019

If you have questions please contact resistance@digital-frontiers.org.

Libraries, Archives, Museums and Digital Humanities

Deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2018
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
contact email: stauffer@lsu.edu
Call for Papers

LIBRARIES, ARCHIVES, MUSEUMS AND DIGITAL HUMANITIES Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019 Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center Albuquerque, New Mexico http://www.southwestpca.org Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Proposals for papers and panels will be accepted beginning August 15 for the 40th annual SWPACA conference.  One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels.  For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

The Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Digital Humanities in Popular Culture area solicits proposals from librarians, archivists, curators, graduate students, faculty, collectors, writers, independent scholars, and other aficionados (yes! including people who use libraries, archives, and museums!) of popular culture and cultural heritage settings of all types. We also encourage proposals for slide shows, video presentations, panels, and roundtables organized around common themes.

Some suggested topics include:

o   Histories and profiles of popular culture resources and collections in cultural heritage institutions; a chance to show off what you’ve got to scholars who might want to use it

o   Intellectual freedom or cultural sensitivity issues related to popular culture resources

o   Book clubs and reading groups, city- or campus-wide reading programs

o   Special exhibits of popular culture resources, outreach programs, etc. of cultural heritage institutions

o   Collection and organization of popular culture resources; marketing and ethical issues

o   Web 2.0, gaming, semantic web, etc. and their impact on libraries, archives, museums, and digital humanities collections

o   The role of public libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions in economic hard times and natural disasters

o   Oral history projects

o   Digital humanities and other digital/data-based projects on popular culture, the Southwest, and other relevant subjects, both those based in cultural heritage institutions and those in academia or other organizations.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2019.  For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

In addition, please check out the organization’s peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the LAMS & DIGITAL HUMANITIES area, please contact its Area Chair, Dr. Suzanne Stauffer stauffer@lsu.edu.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

ARLIS/NA Midstates

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) invites those engaged in work related to visual arts and information science to submit a proposal for a presentation at the annual Fall meeting on Friday, October 19th, 2018 in Indianapolis.  Submissions are welcomed in the following formats:

  • Presentations – a talk of 20 minutes, given by one or more presenter, with or without the use of visual aids
  • Lightening-round talks – a talk of 3-5 minutes, given by one presenter, with or without the use of visual aids; particularly suited for emerging trends
  • Poster presentations – a visual presentation in poster format about ongoing or completed projects; presenters may provide handouts and/or speak with viewers in an informal setting

Prospective presenters are encouraged to submit proposals on a variety of issues related to art, design, and visual culture, including:

  • book arts
  • cataloging issues
  • collaboration and partnerships across institutions
  • collection development
  • copyright and open access related to visual materials
  • critical librarianship
  • digital humanities
  • diversity and inclusion in the art library
  • information literacy for artists and art historians
  • museum librarianship
  • outreach to users
  • challenges in special collections
  • web archiving

Submission guidelines:

Submit an abstract of 300 words to Sarah Carter at saccarte@indiana.edu.  Specify your preferred presentation format (presentation, lightening round talk, poster presentation).

Submission deadline: Tuesday, September 18thFall meeting information:

Dates: Friday, October 19th, and Saturday, October 20th, 2018

Venue: Herron Art Library and IUPUI University Library

Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Indianapolis, IN

About ARLIS/NA Midstates:

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a dynamic group of library and information professionals dedicated to art, architecture, design and visual resources. The chapter serves the region including Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. Our members are art and architecture librarians, visual resources curators, museum professionals, archivists and special collections librarians, collectors and appreciators, book publishers and dealers, content providers, educators, artists, and students. The chapter meets twice a year, supporting our professional network, sharing information and visiting member institutions. We welcome all interested members of ARLIS/NA and all students enrolled in regional library and information science programs to become members of the Midstates Chapter. Participation in our meetings is open to all.

Digitorium 2018

Event:                  Digitorium Digital Humanities Conference

When:                  Thursday, October 4 – Saturday, October 6, 2018

Where:                 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

for more information go to https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/digitorium/cfp/

We are delighted to invite proposals for Digitorium 2018, a large-scale, international Digital Humanities conference to be held for the fourth time at The University of Alabama, October 4 – 6, 2018.

We seek proposals on Digital Humanities work from researchers, practitioners, and graduate students which showcase innovative ways in which digital methods have brought scholarship and scholarly communities to life, whether locally or globally. We especially welcome proposals which discuss the use of digital methods and their novel results for research, pedagogy, and public scholarship. The conference will host research presentations, roundtables, and workshops throughout the event for participants to gain new digital skills, and to share their expertise in using particular tools. The workshops allow participants to see the scholarly results of using a given digital tool (e.g., OpenRefine, oXygen, Story Maps, QGIS, Paper Machines, Visual Eyes, etc.), and then to learn how to use it themselves. For these sessions, we invite proposals from scholars interested in giving an initial 10-20 minute paper about their research project followed by leading a 30-40 minute hands-on workshop in which they will teach other participants how to use one of the digital tools deployed for the research presentation.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

We have two key “pathways” for which participants can submit abstracts:

  • Digital Methods: presentations on exciting new applications of digital methods, whether to bring an under-served subject to public attention, or to break new ground in established fields.
  • Digital Pedagogy and Public Scholarship: presentations on the use of digital methods in innovative teaching approaches, and for public outreach by universities, libraries, museums, and other institutions who are engaging communities via digital scholarship.

Proposals:

We seek proposals for the following types of presentation for the conference:

  • 20-minute papers.
  • 5-minute lightning talks.
  • Workshops: a 10-20 minute paper followed by leading a hands-on workshop using the tool employed for your research (see above for details).
  • Posters.
  • Digital exhibits
    • Bring your digital exhibit to the conference and present it as you would a poster.
  • Workshops to share techniques which you have found useful.
  • Roundtables.
  • Experiential presentations
    • 20-30 minute workshop-style presentations walking your audience through a digital method which you have used for specific scholarly outcomes.
  • Panels of three or four 20-minute papers or two experiential presentations.
  • Panels comprised of a whole project team.

All proposals should be made via the Submissions page on the conference website.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

For more information about the conference, including our plenary speakers, the venue, and the departments generously offering their support for this event, please explore our website. If you have any questions please feel free to contact Thomas C. Wilson, Associate Dean for Research & Technology at tcwilson@ua.edu.

Digitorium is made possible by the generous support of the University Libraries at The University of Alabama.

Emerging Technologies, Evolving Professionals:Change Management Practices for Library Systems and Technologies

Upcoming LITA title (2019)

By Courtney McAllister
Submission Deadline: June 15, 2018
 
Decisions Announced: July 1, 2018
Do you have first-hand experience managing technology changes at a museum, archive, or public/academic/special/law/corporate/military/medical library? A technology change could be an intimidating project, like an ILS migration or makerspace launch, or something a bit more subtle, like introducing a new chat widget at the reference desk. Please consider submitting a brief write-up of your experience to enrich an upcoming LITA guide.
As we all know, library systems and technologies are evolving rapidly, but maintaining one’s technical skill set is not enough to successfully organize and implement change. Information professionals must also develop techniques that enable them to navigate the intricate interplay of human anxieties, perceptions, expectations, and mental models that accompany technological change. This guide is designed to equip new and seasoned practitioners with the strategies they need to master interpersonal and technical interdepencies.
“Notes from the Field” segments will integrate a diverse range of condensed case studies into the guide’s core chapters. These brief, first-hand experiences will address the following topics (please focus on either 1, 2, or 3):
1. The role of change agents in technology change. Specifically,
a) Your experience hiring a change agent to introduce or implement a technology change…
What was the catalyst for the change agent?
What traits did you look for in a prospective change agent?
How did other staff respond?
What worked/didn’t work?
Was the technology change successful?
If you started the process from scratch, what would do you differently?
b) Your experience fulfilling the role of a technology change agent…
How did other staff respond?
What strategies did you employ to adapt?
What worked/didn’t work?
Was the technology change successful?
If you started the process from scratch, what would you differently?
2. The role of assessment in technology change. Specifically,
What assessment strategies have worked/not worked for you.
What questions have you asked to guide your assessment of how technologies are operating within your organization?
How have you determined technology needs at your organization?
How have you evaluated potential technology changes?
3. Socializing technology changes among end users. Specifically,
How have you promoted or announced an upcoming technology change to end users?
How did you gather feedback?
How did you respond to user feedback?
What surprised you most about user reactions?
Please write a brief (1,000 words max) summary of your experience(s) with any ONE of the above topics, and submit for consideration by June 15, 2018
Please send an email with your submission and contact information to cmcallis@citadel.edu Use of the following subject line is strongly encouraged: LITA Case Study, YOUR NAME
Notification emails will be sent by July 1, 2018
Thank you very much!
Sincerely,
Courtney McAllister

CPT Courtney R. McAllister, MA, MLIS | Electronic Resources Librarian

Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities

While the debates in and around the digital humanities continue–what they are, why they are, what they contribute to humanities scholarship–those working in the field know the truly transformative work being done both nationally and internationally. This proposed collection of essays, Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities, will build on the critical work has been done to date to showcase DH scholarship, while expanding the focus to provide a broadly international perspective. To this end, we especially encourage scholars working outside the U.S. to consider submitting a proposal. We have an expression of interest in this project from Routledge.

 

We are looking for essays that not only describe long-term projects/large-impact projects but those that also place the work within a cultural context and what is happening in terms of DH. Finally, proposed essays should be forward looking, addressing the question(s): how does this work indicate where DH is going/where it should be going/where it could be going? Essays may take the form of case studies, if appropriate. A 300-word abstract and one-page c.v. should be submitted by January 22, 2018 to Marta Deyrup <marta.deyrup@shu.edu> and Mary Balkun <mary.balkun@shu.edu>.