Category Archives: Gender Issues in Libraries

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library, Columbia, Connecticut

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian, Michigan

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter Park, Florida

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights, social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming, professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published. Public, school and special librarians, LIS instructors are especially encouraged to submit.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by October 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, LAST NAME on subject line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

 

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II

Call for abstracts for! The deadline is Aug 1 – and we’re looking forward to seeing
your ideas! For more information, contact Ann Braithwaite,
abraithwaite@upei.ca and/or Catherine Orr, orrc@beloit.edu

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies – Volume II

(under contract with Routledge/Taylor and Francis)

Call for Chapter Proposals – August 1, 2017

Catherine M. Orr and Ann Braithwaite, Editors

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II (RWGS II) is an anthology that
addresses the complexities and inherent paradoxes of the expansive
knowledge project known as Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) for audiences
both inside and adjacent to the field. RWGS II continues the work of Rethinking
Women’s and Gender Studies (Routledge 2012)
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>
but
seeks to complement rather than merely update it. It is both the same, in
that it explores key terms and common narratives, and different, in that it
stretches its scope of exploration vis-à-vis new terms that now circulate
both in WGS and other interdisciplinary knowledge projects. Thus, our focus
in this new volume is more future oriented in that we want authors to think
about what terms are crossing field boundaries and where those
boundary-crossings can take us.*

List of Possible Terms Include (but are not limited to): Nation,
Decoloniality, Race, Anti/Blackness, Inclusion, Consent, Women of Color,
Whiteness, Indigeneity, Women, Cis-, Citizenship, Masculinity, Disability,
Diversity, Affect, Social Justice, Non-human animals, Eco-feminism,
Critical, Civic Engagement, Experience/Experiential Learning, Branding,
Inclusive Excellence, The Ph.D., Violence, Expertise, Entrepreneurship

In exploring a term, we ask each contributor contemplate the following
questions:

How are you positioned in relation to the field of WGS? What moves you
to take up this particular term?

How does this term function in WGS–intellectually, institutionally,
administratively, and/or pedagogically?

What are some of the tensions within WGS generated by this term?

How does this term point to, overlap, or contradict other theoretical
languages, approaches, and fields?

How does this term reflect different temporalities (disciplinary
histories, “times,” career clocks, or generations) within or beyond WGS?

What would a reconsideration of this term offer to WGS as a knowledge
project?

Chapter Proposals DUE August 1, 2017:  500-word abstract that addresses
some or all of above questions plus bio or short CV. Send to:
orrc@beloit.edu and abraithwaite@upei.ca

Final Draft of Chapters DUE: January 10, 2018.  6000 words maximum
(including endnotes), Times New Roman, 12-point manuscript text with
one-inch margins.

*More about  RWGS II:

As with RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II focuses on asking how certain terms come to be taken-for-granted in
WGS, exploring both the unacknowledged assumptions and subsequent
unintended consequences of their use. Identifying and interrogating the
functions and effects of these terms continues to reflect our understanding
of WGS as a knowledge project, one that asks questions about how we come to
know something as much as what it is we claim to know.  As such, RWGS
II continues
to interrogate the field through a double(d) lens, insisting that the
languages that circulate in the field constitute both our methods of
analysis and our objects of study.

Using the same organizational approach of constructing critical genealogies
of key terms as in RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II extends that earlier project, now unpacking, exploring, and
accounting for terms that are not necessarily unique to WGS but that are
nevertheless influential in its current understandings and practices.
Think, for instance, of terms that circulate just as much in
interdisciplinary projects adjacent to WGS (e.g., Ethnic Studies,
Indigenous Studies, Disability Studies, Queer Studies, Prison Studies,
Social Justice Studies) as they do in WGS. We think of these terms as sites
of encounter that are characterized just as much by agreement and consensus
as by contestation and conflict as they cross inter/disciplinary
boundaries. Their mobilization in WGS has the potential to excite and
agitate the field imaginary in ways that are both productive and
problematic for the present and future(s) of  WGS.

Likewise, RWGS II aims to further explore the ways in which WGS always
works both within and against the institution within which it is located,
through a variety of terms and narratives that take the university itself
as a site of encounter in need of further interrogation. What happens if
those terms are faced head on, and even embraced by and in the name of WGS?
What productive work of social change, and of critical reflection on the
relationships between identity/knowledge/power, can occur when WGS—uneasily
to be sure—encounters these terms and practices them “otherwise?” Can such
counterintuitive moves illuminate new–as yet unthought–futures of WGS?
Can embracing a politics of engagement (rather than a politics of refusal)
reveal new genealogies and different trajectories for and of this field, in
academia and beyond?

Violence Against Women: Special Issue on Gender-based violence on college campuses

Submissions for a special issue of the journal *Violence Against Women* are
sought from scholars and community activists working to end gender based
violence on college campuses. Papers in the special issue will examine
activist and other transformational responses to GBV by students, faculty
and staff, and the ways they are enacting change locally to challenge the
scaffolding of GBV, often described as rape culture (Buchwald, Fletcher &
Roth, 2005; Henry & Powell, 2014), lad culture (Phipps and Young, 2015),
and laddism (Lewis, Marine, & Kenney, 2016). The prioritising of
programmatic, solution-based interventions to tackle GBV in the university
context poses unique challenges to meaningful cultural transformation,
which this volume will productively explore. The special issue provides an
opportunity for critical engagement with institutional policies and
practices in terms of how they contribute to or inhibit cultural
transformation.

Abstracts of 250 words should be submitted by *August 7th* to *Dr. Ruth
Lewis *(ruth.lewis@northumbria.ac.uk) and *Dr. Susan Marine* (
marines@merrimack.edu).

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Michigan.
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
July 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, YOUR LAST NAME on subject
line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJBIDE:

The International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) investigates critically the positioning of diverse individuals in formal and informal contexts of education – from kindergarten to adult education, but also lifelong learning. Diversities here refer to different identity markers such as ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, citizenship, disabilities, educational background and language(s). IJBIDE is clearly positioned within a non-essentialist and non-culturalist perspective. IJBIDE also aims to promote original research methods by linking up macro- and micro- methodological approaches. The journal is fully blind peer reviewed by the best experts in the field and publishes empirical and conceptual research and case studies from around the world.

Indices of IJBIDE:

  • Cabell’s Directories
  • Google Scholar
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJBIDE:

The topics covered in the contributions include (but are not limited to):

  • The perception, place and role of diversities in (teacher) education (students, teachers, student-teachers, leadership, etc.)
  • Bullying, bias, segregation and discrimination in education
  • Academic and student mobility and diversities
  • Diversities and informal learning
  • School choices and diversities
  • Teaching about diversities (intercultural/global competence)
  • Forms of discrimination and segregation in education
  • Place/space and diversities
  • Diversities and digital educational technologies
  • Links between ‘home’ and school in relation to diversities (parents)
  • Media representations of diversities in education
  • Assessment, evaluation and diversities
  • Role and place of diversities in education policies
  • Diversities within a school system
  • Teaching material and diversities
  • History of diversities in education
  • Interactions between and integration of students of diverse backgrounds
  • Role and place of teachers of diverse backgrounds
  • Perception and integration of the ‘foreigner’ in education
  • Diversities and multilingual education
  • Methods or methodologies/conceptual approaches and researching diversities
  • Reflexivity and/or critical awareness around diversities in education
  • Social Action and Diversities
  • The commodification or processes of commodifying of diversities in education
  • Inclusive education and diversities
  • The impact of globalization on diversities
  • Social processes and diversification/differentiation
  • Multimodality and diversities

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-bias-identity-diversities/125026

Where There is Thunder, There is Lightning: EDI and Change in Libraries

Program Date and Time: Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

The ALA Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Implementation Working Group is looking for lightning talks on equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives from a broad range of libraries.

The presentation will be on Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, IL and will include the option for video presentations if you can’t attend in person.

Presenters will have 5 minutes to share their successes and failures with initiatives designed to promote equity, diversity, and inclusion in your libraries, which means we have time for up to 12 presentations.

To apply for participation, please submit the following:

Title

Brief description for your presentation

Will you be presenting in person or submitting a video

Email to diversity@ala.org , Use the subject line: Lightning Talk Application

Applications are due by May 15th and participants will be announced by May 31st.

If you have any questions about the event or the process, please contact Martin Garnar at mgarnar@uccs.edu.

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section

2017 Research Forum Call for Proposals (Posters OR Lightning talks)

The Women & Gender Studies Section will hold its 10th annual Research Forum during our General Membership Meeting at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago on Saturday, June 24, 2017, from 4:30-5:30 p.m. (The schedule is not finalized, this may change.) The forum seeks to provide an opportunity to present newly completed research or work in progress. Both beginning and established researchers are welcome to apply. Participants may receive collaborative feedback and recommendations for future publishing and/or new initiatives.

 

The potential scope of the topics includes, but is not limited to, teaching partnerships, critical information literacy initiatives, collection development, and scholarly communications. For research ideas, see the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

 

Applicants chosen to present their work at the forum may choose to do so via EITHER a poster or a lightning talk (5 minutes). Tables for posters will be provided. There will not be any audiovisual equipment for those choosing to do lightning talks, so keep that in mind when choosing your format. If visuals are essential, the poster format would be better.

 

Presenters at the forum will find an arena for discussion and networking with their colleagues interested in related issues and trends in the profession.

The committee will use a blind peer review process. 

 

Selection criteria:

Significance of the topic. Priority will be given to Women and Gender Studies Section members and/or women and gender studies topics.

 

Proposal submission instructions:

1. Proposals should include:  

          Title of the proposal

          Proposal narrative (no more than 2 pages, double spaced) 

          Name of applicant(s) 

          Affiliation (s) 

          Applicant Email address(es)

          Are you a member of the Women & Gender Studies Section? 

–      Format: Poster OR Lightning talk

 

2. Submission deadline: March 31, 2017

3. Proposals should be emailed to: Jennifer Gilley, Chair, Research Committee, WGSS (jrg15@psu.edu)

4. The chair will notify the applicants by April 28,2017

The Journal of Homosexuality Special issue 25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs

Dear Colleagues,

I wanted to share with you the CFP for a special issues of The Journal of Homosexuality for which I am a guest co-editor. The upcoming special issue, “25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs,” will be published in 2018.

To mark the 25th anniversary of a 1993 issue on Gay and Lesbian Studies as an emergent discipline, my co-editors and I proposed an issue intended to explore the ways in which LGBTQ Studies programs have developed, evolved, adapted, and sustained themselves within the academy — and continue to do so.

Please share the CFP with your colleagues and lists, and consider submitting:

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/beh/jh_25_years

Molly Merryman, Ph.D.,
Director of the Center
for the Study of Gender and Sexuality
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology
Kent State University

Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) is seeking contributions to Intersections blog

The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) is seeking contributions to Intersections, our blog – www.ala.org/intersections.

In particular, we are looking to highlight resources, initiatives, responses, and model practices in diversity, literacy, and outreach services.  Articles are typically 250-500 words, and can include images, video, or any files or shareable resources to help augment your post. We typically look for original articles that are not published elsewhere, and accept proposals on an ongoing basis. We hope you will consider sharing your stories with the larger library community!

Interested in contributing, or have any questions about the blog? Please contact me at 312.280.2140, or email jamundsen@ala.org.