Category Archives: Gender Issues in Libraries

Where There is Thunder, There is Lightning: EDI and Change in Libraries

Program Date and Time: Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

The ALA Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Implementation Working Group is looking for lightning talks on equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives from a broad range of libraries.

The presentation will be on Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, IL and will include the option for video presentations if you can’t attend in person.

Presenters will have 5 minutes to share their successes and failures with initiatives designed to promote equity, diversity, and inclusion in your libraries, which means we have time for up to 12 presentations.

To apply for participation, please submit the following:

Title

Brief description for your presentation

Will you be presenting in person or submitting a video

Email to diversity@ala.org , Use the subject line: Lightning Talk Application

Applications are due by May 15th and participants will be announced by May 31st.

If you have any questions about the event or the process, please contact Martin Garnar at mgarnar@uccs.edu.

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section

ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section

2017 Research Forum Call for Proposals (Posters OR Lightning talks)

The Women & Gender Studies Section will hold its 10th annual Research Forum during our General Membership Meeting at the ALA Annual Conference in Chicago on Saturday, June 24, 2017, from 4:30-5:30 p.m. (The schedule is not finalized, this may change.) The forum seeks to provide an opportunity to present newly completed research or work in progress. Both beginning and established researchers are welcome to apply. Participants may receive collaborative feedback and recommendations for future publishing and/or new initiatives.

 

The potential scope of the topics includes, but is not limited to, teaching partnerships, critical information literacy initiatives, collection development, and scholarly communications. For research ideas, see the Research Agenda for Women and Gender Studies Librarianship.

 

Applicants chosen to present their work at the forum may choose to do so via EITHER a poster or a lightning talk (5 minutes). Tables for posters will be provided. There will not be any audiovisual equipment for those choosing to do lightning talks, so keep that in mind when choosing your format. If visuals are essential, the poster format would be better.

 

Presenters at the forum will find an arena for discussion and networking with their colleagues interested in related issues and trends in the profession.

The committee will use a blind peer review process. 

 

Selection criteria:

Significance of the topic. Priority will be given to Women and Gender Studies Section members and/or women and gender studies topics.

 

Proposal submission instructions:

1. Proposals should include:  

          Title of the proposal

          Proposal narrative (no more than 2 pages, double spaced) 

          Name of applicant(s) 

          Affiliation (s) 

          Applicant Email address(es)

          Are you a member of the Women & Gender Studies Section? 

–      Format: Poster OR Lightning talk

 

2. Submission deadline: March 31, 2017

3. Proposals should be emailed to: Jennifer Gilley, Chair, Research Committee, WGSS (jrg15@psu.edu)

4. The chair will notify the applicants by April 28,2017

The Journal of Homosexuality Special issue 25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs

Dear Colleagues,

I wanted to share with you the CFP for a special issues of The Journal of Homosexuality for which I am a guest co-editor. The upcoming special issue, “25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs,” will be published in 2018.

To mark the 25th anniversary of a 1993 issue on Gay and Lesbian Studies as an emergent discipline, my co-editors and I proposed an issue intended to explore the ways in which LGBTQ Studies programs have developed, evolved, adapted, and sustained themselves within the academy — and continue to do so.

Please share the CFP with your colleagues and lists, and consider submitting:

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/beh/jh_25_years

Molly Merryman, Ph.D.,
Director of the Center
for the Study of Gender and Sexuality
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology
Kent State University

Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) is seeking contributions to Intersections blog

The ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) is seeking contributions to Intersections, our blog – www.ala.org/intersections.

In particular, we are looking to highlight resources, initiatives, responses, and model practices in diversity, literacy, and outreach services.  Articles are typically 250-500 words, and can include images, video, or any files or shareable resources to help augment your post. We typically look for original articles that are not published elsewhere, and accept proposals on an ongoing basis. We hope you will consider sharing your stories with the larger library community!

Interested in contributing, or have any questions about the blog? Please contact me at 312.280.2140, or email jamundsen@ala.org.

 

We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology

Call for Essays

Working Title: We Can Do I.T. : Women in Library Information Technology
Editors: Jenny Brandon, Sharon Ladenson, Kelly Sattler
Submission Deadline: March 27, 2017
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Description of book:
What roles are women playing in information technology (I.T.) in libraries? What are rewards that women experience, as well as challenges they face in library I.T.? What are future visions for women in library I.T.?

This edited collection will provide a voice for people to share insights into the culture, challenges, and rewards of being a woman working in library I.T.  We are soliciting personal narratives from anyone who works in a library about what it is like to be a woman, or working with women, in library I.T. We also seek essays on visions for the future of women within library I.T. and how such visions could be achieved. This collection should be useful not only for those pursuing a career in library I.T., but also for library managers seeking to facilitate a more inclusive environment for the future. Through publishing a collection of personal narratives, we also seek to bring experiences of women in library I.T. from the margins to the center.
For the purposes of this collection, we consider library I.T. to include responsibilities in computer networks, hardware, and software support; computer programming (e.g. coding in python, php, java…); web development (e.g. admins, coders, front/back end developers,…); and/or the management of such areas.

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

*   How you started in library I.T.
*   Stories related to being a woman in library I.T.
*   Experiences of acceptance or resistance within the library I.T. community
*   Tips and advice for other women seeking a career in library I.T.
*   Changes in your career path because of entering library I.T.
*   Changes you’d like to see happen within the library I.T. culture
*   Advice for library management on how to improve library I.T. culture
*   A vision for the future about/for women in library I.T.

Timeline:
Submission deadline: March 27, 2017
Notification/Feedback regarding submission: May 12, 2017
Editing and revision: June – July 2017
Final manuscript due to publisher: September 2017

Submissions:
This volume will contain commentary, stories, and essays (from 140 characters to 1,500 words).
If your submission is tentatively accepted, we may request modifications.
Material cannot be previously published.
To submit your essay, please fill out this Google form: https://goo.gl/forms/6oE82aFe7atFlP6j1
For questions, email womenlibit@googlegroups.com<mailto:womenlibit@googlegroups.com>

About the Editors:
Jenny Brandon earned a BA in interdisciplinary humanities at Michigan State University, and an MLIS from Wayne State University.  She is a self-taught web designer/front end developer, and is currently employed in Web Services at Michigan State University.  She is also a reference librarian.

Sharon Ladenson is Gender and Communication Studies Librarian at Michigan State University.  Her writing on feminist pedagogy and critical information literacy is included in works such as Critical Library Instruction: Theories and Methods (from Library Juice Press) and the Critical Library Pedagogy Handbook (from the Association of College and Research Libraries). She is an active member of the Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) of the Association of College and Research Libraries, and has presented with WGSS colleagues at the National Women’s Studies Association Annual Conference.

Kelly Sattler has a degree in computer engineering and spent 12 years in corporate I.T. before earning her MLIS degree from University of Illinois-Urbana/Champaign. Currently, she is the Head of Web Services at Michigan State University Libraries. She is an active member in LITA.

Journal of Working-Class Studies

*JWCS *is an online, open-access, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal
that brings together the work of scholars, writers, artists and activists
who are committed to the study and representation of working-class life. We
aim to publish writing about the global working class – a diverse group of
people whose commonality is their position in classed societies.

The inaugural issue <https://workingclassstudiesjournal.com/> features an
introduction by editors Sarah Attfield and Liz Giuffre; articles by leaders
in the field of working-class studies such as Sherry Lee Linkon, John
Russo, Jack Metzgar, and Michael Zweig; and work from emerging voices whose
scholarship focuses on the many intersections of class. Also included are
reviews of books by Tim Sheard, Michelle Tokarczyk and George Lakey.

We invite submissions that contribute significant knowledge to our
understanding of who the global working class(es) are and have been, as
well as what it means to ‘study’ class, conceptually and as a
socio-economic reality. We especially encourage work that explores how
class intersects with other vectors of identity and experience, including
race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability, and citizenship status.  The
journal reviews books that feature working-class people, communities,
culture, history, politics, and/or experience as a crucial component of
their scholarly or artistic vision. We also invite artists to submit short
comics or excerpts of longer works. For further information about
submissions, please visit our “Instructions for Authors
<https://workingclassstudiesjournal.com/instructions-for-authors/>” page.

Formed in 2003, the Working-Class Studies Association
<https://wcstudiesassociation.wordpress.com/>is an international
organization which promotes the study of working-class people and their
culture. The Working-Class Studies Association is made up of academics,
activists, teachers, writers, poets, journalists, practitioners, students,
artists and a wide range of others interested in developing the field of
working-class studies. The organization holds an annual conference as well
as other events to promote the field (including a variety of awards), and
act as a discussion forum for working-class issues. The organization is
based in North America and has members world-wide.

We hope you will enjoy the new *Journal of Working-Class Studies*!

To contact the founding editors, Sarah Attfield, Liz Giuffre, please email
editorial@workingclassstudiesjournal.com.

The *Journal of Working-Class Studies* is published by the Working-Class
Studies Association c/o The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies, Collin
College, Spring Creek Campus, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, Texas
75074, USA.

Leadership in Higher Education Conference

The Call for Proposals is now open.

Magna Publications and Academic Leader invite proposals for concurrent sessions for the 2017 Leadership in Higher Education Conference, October 19-21, 2017 in Baltimore, Md.

The Leadership in Higher Education Conference provides an opportunity for academic leaders to learn innovative strategies, trends, and best practices for effective management from nationally recognized experts and to network with like-minded peers from a wide range of academic institutions. Keynote and plenary speeches, concurrent interactive workshop sessions, and roundtable conversations foster a climate of learning and collaboration.

We seek interactive sessions that engage and inform attendees. Submissions should relate to one of the following areas; however compelling and relevant proposals that fall outside of these designated topics are also welcome:

1. Best Practices for Deans and Department Chairs

This track will give you all the tools you need to be a success:

  • Faculty evaluation basics
  • Managing a department or division
  • What you need to know about learning theory and pedagogy
  • Basic budgeting for a department and doing more with less
  • New Leadership: A successful first year for newly appointed deans or chairs

2. Leadership and Management

Learn effective management practices:

  • Facilitating a collegial department
  • Managing challenging faculty situations
  • Balancing faculty and administrative needs
  • Handling conflict

3. Evaluation and Program/Department Assessment

Assessment is very much on the minds of administrators, as states, accreditors, students, and parents all look for evidence of quality. Topics include:

  • Working with accreditors
  • Understanding trends in state assessment and compliance
  • Strategic planning for evaluation and assessment
  • Best practices in learning assessment

4. Faculty Hiring and Development

One of the most important jobs of an academic leader is to select the right new department members and provide faculty development opportunities, such as:

  • Conducting effective searches
  • Designing an effective faculty development program
  • Understanding the different needs of faculty who teach face-to-face, in hybrid classrooms, and online
  • Using technology and online delivery for faculty development
  • Managing promotion and tenure

5. Issues and Trends in Higher Education

Topics may include:

  • Financial
  • Legal/Regulatory
  • ADA or UDL compliance
  • Diversity
  • Effective budgeting

The deadline is March 31, 2017. Notifications of acceptance will be sent by June 2, 2017.

Learn more about the proposal process, including guidelines for writing a strong proposal

To see what information we’re requesting in the proposal, look here

When you’re ready, please submit your proposal using our online form located here

Questions regarding the submission process should be directed to MaryAnn Mlekush, conference manager, at mmlekush@magnapubs.com, or 608-227-8138. Presenters are responsible for their own conference registration fee, travel, and lodging.

All submissions go through a blind, peer-review process by our advisory board. Members use the following rubric to evaluate proposals:

The Future of Librarianship: Exploring what’s next for the Academic Librarian, LACUNY Institute 2017

Call for Proposals

Date: May 12, 2017

Location: LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York

Keynote Speaker: TBA

Submission Deadline: February 1, 2017

Submission Form

 

Librarians cannot predict the future but they can speculate about it. . .

 The LACUNY Institute 2017 is seeking futuristic proposals that think beyond the current to share a vision of the academic librarians’ position in a changing information landscape.

 In addressing the theme, the Future of Librarianship: Exploring what’s next for the Academic Librarian, we are interested in proposals that address the implications of current events and changes in higher education on the way that academic librarians plan a career in librarianship, engage students, faculty, and the community, how and where they offer services and resources to patrons, and  how librarians can navigate the current trends in library science and in the global world to prepare for a successful career in librarianship.

 

The LACUNY Institute Committee seeks proposals that address the future of academic librarians in college and university libraries, archives, and the information studies, across myriad roles (staff, faculty, students, patrons, etc.) and functions (technical services, public services, instruction, etc.). Such proposals can deal with innovation already in practice and/or futuristic ideas concerning librarianship.

 

Example topics include but are not limited to:

  • Impact of current events on library trends
  • Innovation and changes in roles, responsibilities, services and resources
  • Impact of technology
  • Leadership, leadership development, and workforce planning
  • Diversity & inclusion,
  • Career planning, professional development
  • Post-truth information literacy, digital literacy, and visual literacy
  • MLS, Curriculum development, and preparedness
  • Civic engagement, partnerships, and community building
  • Librarians as knowledge gatekeepers, personal freedom, and privacy

 

The Institute will have four tracks: panel presentations, facilitated dialogues, and alt-sessions.

  • Panel papers (15 minutes/presenter): Moderated panel presentations with time for questions and discussion.
  • Facilitated dialogues (45 minutes): Teams of two lead a discussion on topic of their choice related to the theme, with one person presenting context and the other facilitating conversation.
  • Alt-sessions (15-30 minutes): An opportunity for exploring topics through multiple ways of knowing (e.g., short documentary, spoken word, performance art).
  • Poster sessions:

 Please submit proposals, including a 300-500 word abstract by February 1, 2017.

 The goal of this event is to create a space for respectful dialogue and debate about these critical issues. We will be publishing a formal code of conduct, but the event organizers will actively strive to create a public space in which multiple perspectives can be heard and no one voice dominates.

 

Questions may be directed to Co-Chairs Kimberley Bugg, kbugg@citytech.cuny.edu or Simone L. Yearwood, Simone.Yearwood@qc.cuny.edu.

2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago Poster Sessions

Share your best ideas and work with the national library community by presenting a poster session at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago!

The poster session committee encourages submissions from all types of libraries and on any topic relevant to librarianship. Submissions may include a description of an innovative library program; an analysis of a solution to a problem; a report of a research study; or any other presentation that would benefit the larger library community.

Poster session participants place materials such as pictures, data, graphs, diagrams and narrative text on boards that are usually 4 x 8 feet. During their assigned 1½ hour time periods, participants informally discuss their presentations with conference attendees. Titles/abstracts from previous years are available on ALA Connect: (note that this site is only serving as an archive for previous Annual Conference poster sessions – for information on this year’s poster session, go to the 2017 ALA poster session website).

The deadline for submitting an application is February 3, 2017. Applicants will be notified in the first half of March, after a double blind peer review process, whether their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. The 2017 ALA Annual Poster Sessions will be held June 24 and 25, 2017 in the exhibits hall.

Start the application process now.  You must login to the site using your ALA username and password, or you can create a username and password for the site before you submit your application.

 Questions about poster session presentations and submissions may be directed to:

Blake Doherty, chair of the ALA poster session committee, bdoherty@amherst.edu

Or

Candace Benefiel, chair of the ALA poster session review panel, c-benefiel@tamu.edu

Website: https://www.conferenceabstracts.com/cfp2/login.asp?EventKey=SGGBSIDC

Pushing the Margins: Women of Color and Intersectionality in LIS

Editors: Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho

Literature on diversity in librarianship has mainly focused on recruitment and increasing numbers of librarians of color. This book shifts the focus beyond numbers and instead on the lived experiences of those who are underrepresented in our profession. Using intersectionality as a framework, this edited collection explores the experiences of women of color in libraries. With roots in black feminism and critical race theory, intersectionality studies the ways in which multiple social and cultural identities impact individual experience. Looking at race and gender isolated from each other fails to see the many dimensions in which they intersect and overlap, creating a complicated lived experience that cannot be captured by studying one identity.

Libraries and librarians idealistically portray themselves as egalitarian and neutral entities that provide information equally to everyone, yet the library as an institution often reflects and perpetuates societal racism, sexism, and additional forms of oppression. Women of color who work in libraries are often placed in the position of balancing the ideal of the library providing good customer service and being an unbiased environment with the lived reality of receiving microaggressions and other forms of harassment on a daily basis from both colleagues and patrons.

Typically these conversations and discussions of our experiences as women of color have happened behind closed doors, within trusted circles of friends. Our hope and intention is that by bringing these conversations into a public space, we will raise consciousness of these experiences and start changing perceptions and expectations.

Proposals may consider the following themes and questions:

  • Invisible and emotional labor
  • Intersections of multiple identities, such as sexuality, gender identity, and socioeconomic class
  • Leadership, management, promotion, and authority
  • Gender presentation and performance
  • Treatment of women of color library workers who are either not in librarian positions or do not have a library degree
  • Experiences of women of color as library patrons
  • How identity affects approaches to collection development
  • How does structural oppression reproduce itself in spaces that are touted to be egalitarian and democratic?
  • How does one maintain respect in the library when confronted with oppressive treatment or being stereotyped based on one’s race, gender, or other social categories?
  • How can library organizations create better work cultures and environments for staff and patrons to exist as their true selves?

This is not an exhaustive list. Proposals are welcome from anyone involved in libraries, archives, and information science. Contributions from people of color, those who belong to communities underrepresented in LIS, and those who work in school and public libraries are strongly encouraged. Essays that are straightforward scholarship are invited and welcome, as are more hybrid or creative approaches that incorporate scholarly writing with personal narrative, illustrations, graphics, or other strategies consistent with feminist and antiracist methodologies.

This collection will contain papers and essays of approximately 2000 – 5000 words. Proposals should include an abstract of no more than 500 words describing the proposed contribution and a short biographical statement. Send proposals to pushingthemargins@gmail.com by October 28, 2016.

Notifications will be sent by November 4, 2016. First drafts of manuscripts will be due May 31, 2017. Editing and revision will occur June-December 2017, with an anticipated publication date of Spring 2018.

This book is forthcoming in the Litwin Books/Library Juice Press Series on Critical Race Studies and Multiculturalism in LIS, Rose L. Chou and Annie Pho, series editors.

About the editors

Rose L. Chou is Budget Coordinator at the American University Library. She received her MLIS from San Jose State University and BA in Sociology from Boston College. Rose serves on the ARL/SAA Mosaic Program Advisory Group and is part of the LIS Microaggressions project team. Her research interests include race, gender, and social justice in LIS.

Annie Pho is Inquiry and Instruction Librarian for Peer-to-Peer Services and Public Programming at UCLA Libraries. She received her MLS from Indiana University-Indianapolis and BA in Art History from San Francisco State University. She’s on the editorial board of In the Library with a Lead Pipe, a co-moderator of the #critlib Twitter chat, and a Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians 2014 alumnus. Her research interests are in critical pedagogy, diversity, and student research behavior.

http://libraryjuicepress.com/pushing-the-margins.php