Category Archives: Instruction

Call for panelists for the ACRL IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum,

2018 ALA Annual Meeting

The IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum is an excellent opportunity for instruction librarians to explore and discuss current topics related to library instruction and information literacy.  The steering committee welcomes proposals from individuals who are interested in being on a panel to discuss Critical Reading.  Critical reading is reading for a “. . . deeper understanding of how information is constructed, valued, and embedded within larger conversations.”

This virtual discussion will take place  in advance of the 2018 ALA Annual Meeting: Wednesday, June 6 at 2 PM EST/11 AM PST.

If you would like to share your knowledge and work in the area of critical reading submit a proposal to be a panelist for the IS Current Issues Virtual Discussion Forum today.

Application Deadline: April 20, 2018

To submit a proposal, please use the online submission form.

Applicants will be notified by May 4, 2018.

Questions?

Contact the ACRL IS Discussion Group Steering Committee Chair, Patrick Wohlmut (pwohlmut@linfield.edu) or Vice-Chair, Lauren Hays (ldhays@mnu.edu).

Currents in Teaching and Learning

Currents in Teaching and Learninga peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars across the disciplines, welcomes submissions for its Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 issues (Volume 10, Numbers 1 and 2).  We consider all submissions that address new approaches to theories and practices of teaching and learning.

Each year we release two issues of Currents, an open-ended Fall issue and a themed issue in the Spring.  We welcome all teaching and learning-related submissions for the Fall Issues.

The theme for the Spring 2019 issue is “Globalizing learning.” With the intensifying clash between nationalism and globalization, the issue of how to incorporate consciousness of global issues and trends into college education has become ever more critical.  For this issue, we invite submissions that address this issue from theoretical and/or practical perspectives. Some questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to):

  • What constitutes “global learning”, and what implications might this have for the nature, substance, content, and methods of tertiary education?
  • What kinds of approaches can be used to integrate global knowledge and skills into teaching and learning across the disciplines?
  • In what ways can global and local forms of knowledge construction be related in classroom and extra-curricular modes of teaching and learning?

Submissions may take the form of:

  • Teaching and Program Reports: short reports from different disciplines on classroom practices (2850–5700 words);
  • Essays: longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today (5700 – 7125 words);
  • Book Reviews: send inquiries attn: Kisha Tracy, Book Review Editor. No unsolicited reviews, please.

We welcome both individual and group submissions.  All submissions must be original, previously unpublished work and, if based in a particular academic discipline, must explicitly consider their relevance and applicability to other disciplines and classroom settings.

Submissions Deadlines:

Fall 2018 issue: August 15, 2018

Spring 2019 issue: December 15, 2018

Submissions received after these dates will be considered on a rolling basis and for the following issue.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters non-specialist, jargon-free exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars. Published twice a year and addressed to faculty and graduate students across the disciplines, Currents seeks to improve teaching and learning in higher education with short reports on classroom practices as well as longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles, and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today.

For essays and teaching and program reports, send all inquiries to Editor Martin Fromm at currents@worcester.edu.  For book reviews, send all inquiries to Book Review Editor Kisha Tracy at ktracy3@fitchburgstate.edu. For submission guidelines, visit our website at www.worcester.edu/currents.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a publication of Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.   ISSN: 1945-3043

5th Annual LILi Conference: It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

5th Annual LILi Conference  Friday, August 17, 2018, 9 am – 1:30 pm Glendale Public Library 222 E Harvard St, Glendale, CA 91205

It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

Proposal Deadline: Friday, April 20, 2018

How has your library fostered information empowerment among its users? LILi invites you to share your library or program’s innovative teachable moments by submitting proposals with practical applications. Lifelong learning and information literacy (IL) development occurs in countless contexts and communities, within and outside the library. Given the skills required to compete in a rapidly changing modern knowledge economy, we can learn from our colleagues in all types of libraries. Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following, all as related to information empowerment:

  • Community outreach and organizing strategies
  • DIY publications (e.g., zines, podcasts, blogs, apps) and other knowledge sharing creations
  • Programming for various populations, including children, teens, seniors, immigrants, English language learners, and other marginalized groups
  • Workshops, one-shots, credit courses, and training sessions supporting students/users/patrons in online and face-to-face settings
  • Community archiving
  • Metaliteracy
  • Data Literacy
  • Digital citizenship
  • Makerspace and escape room activities that foster transferable problem solving skills
  • Open educational resource (OER) and open pedagogy initiatives

LILi invites you to submit proposals with practical application and built-in audience interaction by April 20, 2018 for a 15-minute presentation. Notification of acceptance by May 18, 2018.

Submit proposals here: http://bit.ly/2GT4pzB

LILi Conference Code of Conduct: http://campusguides.glendale.edu/lili/ConductCode

Questions? Annie Knight (knight_annie@sac.edu) or Susie Chin (schin@glendale.edu)

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication

Special Issue Call for Papers from Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication.

Guest editor: Nina Clements, Librarian and Information Literacy Coordinator at California State University-Channel Islands

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication is an inter- and cross- disciplinary double-blind peer reviewed journal. It publishes contemporary research and practice which explores the way that people and organisations interact in the digital information environment. It is concerned with innovation and developments in digital information, as they relate to global knowledge, communication and world memory.  It covers the creation, management, dissemination and use of the full range of information objects.

In 2017, The Association of College & Research Libraries published a white paper sharing international perspectives on information literacy entitled, Fostering a Dialogue for International Understanding. This themed issue wants expand on the unique challenges and opportunities for “Global Information Literacy” and will explore the extent to which there is global acceptance and a shared understanding of the term information literacy. Proposals are requested that explore the role of information literacy frameworks within a specific country and an assessment of how these frameworks foster a dialogue for international understanding.

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

•    Case studies comparing information literacy frameworks from two different countries or cultures (SCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy and the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, for example)
•    Discussions of definitional issues of information literacy related to specific cultural contexts
•    Reflections on how information literacy standards reflect the educational priorities of a country or region.
•    The role of critical librarianship in shaping information literacy pedagogy.
•    The impact of linguistic diversity and multilingualism on information literacy frameworks


Submissions
Submissions should comply with the journal author guidelines which are here. They should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer review system. Registration and access is available at https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/gkmc
Deadlines

•    Deadline for submissions: 30 May 2018
•    Peer review: July-September 2018
•    Revisions, copyediting, proofing etc.: October and November 2018
•    Publication of special issue: January 2019

 

Social Media for Communication and Instruction in Academic Libraries

Call for Chapters

Propose a chapter for this book

Editors  

Jennifer Joe, Western Kentucky University  Elisabeth Knight, Western Kentucky University

IMPORTANT DATES

Accepted proposals will be notified by May 30, 2018. The review process will run from August 30th, to October 15th, with review results given to authors by October 30th. Final acceptance notifications will be sent by December 15th, 2018.

 

Introduction  The subject of the use of social media has been renewed by the impact that social media had on the last U.S. presidential election, and the impact that social media networks will have on subsequent elections. This has called attention to the relevance and urgency of incorporating social media use into the academic library, both as a marketing tool and as an instruction tool – and even as an instruction topic. As guides in the information world, it is important that librarians be well-versed in social media. This publication seeks to be an up-to-date, “post-truth” look at the importance of social media in all facets of library marketing and instruction at the academic (post-secondary) level.

Objective  The objective of this book is to provide a concise reference for librarians in the field to consult for advice and guidance in using social media in academic libraries and in instruction, with special emphasis on assessment and evidence-based practiced. This volume will give librarians the foundation necessary to argue for or against social media use in their library, as is appropriate for their situation.

 

Target Audience  The target audience of this book will be composed of professionals and researchers working in the field of information and knowledge management in various disciplines, e.g. library, information and communication sciences, administrative sciences and management, education, adult education, and information technology. Moreover, the book will provide insights and support professionals in the field who wish to incorporate or improve upon social media use at their respective institutions.

 

Recommended Topics:

  • What is/are Social Media?
  • Similarities/Differences in Social Media Use among different libraries
  • Social Media and Academic Library Marketing
  • Social Media as an Information Literacy Tool
  • Social Media as an Information Literacy Topic
  • Social Media Assessment for Marketing
  • Social Media Assessment for Library Instruction
  • Problems with Social Media Use (FERPA, etc.)
  • Examples of Social Media Use in Academic Libraries

 

Submission Procedure:

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before April 30, 2018, a chapter proposal of 500 to 1,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by May 30, 2018 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by August 30, 2018, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

 

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2019.

 

Inquiries:

For questions, please contact Jennifer Joe (jennifer.joe@wku.edu) or Elisabeth Knight (elisabeth.knight@wku.edu).

Propose a chapter for this book

Thank you,

 Jennifer Joe and Elisabeth Knight

 

Teaching for Curiosity, Creativity, and Action 17th Annual Information Literacy Summit

Friday, April 20, 2018, 8:30am-3:30pm

Presented by DePaul University Library and Moraine Valley Community College Library

Located at the Moraine Valley Community College campus

Palos Hills, IL

Keynote Address

Char Booth, Associate Dean of the University Library at California State University San Marcos and an ACRL Immersion Institute faculty member

Call for Proposals 

We are seeking presenters to lead engaging and interactive discussions about information literacy and library instruction. We are especially interested in breakout sessions and panels which focus on this year’s theme: Teaching for Curiosity, Creativity, and Action. How might we engage our learners to help them develop curiosity and creativity? What role does information literacy play in taking action and making change in our communities? How might our own teaching practice reflect these dispositions? We hope to foster conversations across all types of libraries, schools, and other organizations and encourage a diversity of perspectives in this proposal call.

The Summit is a regional conference which will be held at the Moraine Valley Community College campus. If you wish to propose more than one breakout session, please fill out a form for each topic. Breakout sessions and panels will be 50 minutes long and should include audience interaction or discussion. Panel discussions should have a three person maximum. Hands-on lessons and demonstrations (and/or practical takeaways) are encouraged. Sessions typically have 20-40 participants.

The submission should include a 200-300 word description of your session. Please include learning outcomes and a brief explanation of why people should attend your session and what they will take away. A shorter abstract (around 100 words) for publication in the Summit programming will be required as well.

Please fill out this Google form to propose a breakout session

Deadline to submit proposals is Friday, January 12, 2018

Some possible topics for sessions include:

Social Justice

Service Learning

Student Curiosity and Creativity

Student Centered Teaching and Learning

Students as creators

Critical Information Literacy

Critical Pedagogies

Reflective Practice

Communities of Practice

Applications of the Framework for Information Literacy

Programmatic assessments

Instructional design

Questions?  Contact:

Moraine Valley Community College Library
Tish Hayes
hayesL45@morainevalley.edu

Susan Miller
millers322@morainevalley.edu

DePaul University Library
Jill King
jking25@depaul.edu

Jennifer Schwartz
jschwa17@depaul.edu

 

Neglected Newberys: A Critical Reassessment at the Centennial

Volume editors: Sara L. Schwebel and Jocelyn Van Tuyl

In anticipation of the one hundredth anniversary of the American Library Association’s Newbery Medal (1922-2022), submissions are welcomed for a volume devoted to critically-neglected Newbery Award-winners.

About the Volume

Since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922, Newbery novels have had an outsized influence on American children’s literature, figuring perennially on publisher’s lists, on library and bookstore shelves, and in K-12 school curricula. As such, they offer a compelling window into the history of U.S. children’s literature and publishing as well as changing societal attitudes about what books are “best” for American children. Nevertheless, many Newbery Award winners—even the most popular and frequently taught titles—have attracted scant critical attention.

This volume offers a critically- and historically-grounded analysis of representative Newbery Medal books and interrogates the disjunction between the books’ omnipresence and influence, on the one hand, and the critical silence surrounding them, on the other.

The editors seek at least one previously unpublished essay per decade (1920s-2010s), with each essay to focus primarily on a single Newbery Medal (not Newbery Honor) title for which little or no literary scholarship exists. We welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

We specifically seek a diversity of Newbery authors, genres, themes, and book settings, but also investigations of how diversity is treated or, especially for earlier works, silenced in the texts.

Avenues for exploration include: neglected categories and sub-genres (horse books, maritime adventure stories, regional literature, retold folktales, one-hit wonders for children by well-known authors); reception and book history (alterations of text to avoid offensive language and imagery, both immediately after the Medal and decades later); critical readings of problematic texts; Newbery winners and their archives; hypotheses regarding critical neglect: the rise of Children’s Literature as an academic field long after the Medal’s inception; the disjunction between the Newbery’s historical whiteness and heteronormativity and current developments in literary criticism; a possible disconnect between librarians who award the medal, K-12 teachers who recommend the books, and university professors who are rewarded for publishing literary criticism.

Submission Information

E-mail the editors (schwebel@sc.edu and vantuyl@ncf.edu) for access to the spreadsheet of books on which we are soliciting contributions, contributor resources, and additional specifications to ensure continuity throughout the volume.

Deadline

The deadline for initial proposals of approximately 500 words is April 1, 2018.

We anticipate requesting completed essays of 6000-7000 words by early 2019 (subject to the publisher’s requirements).

eLearning Africa

eLearning Africa is the key networking event for ICT supported education, training and skills development in Africa. Bringing together high-level policy makers, decision makers and practitioners from education, business and government, eLearning Africa 2018 will take place from 26 – 28 September 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda. Call for Proposal deadline is January 30, 2018.

Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities

While the debates in and around the digital humanities continue–what they are, why they are, what they contribute to humanities scholarship–those working in the field know the truly transformative work being done both nationally and internationally. This proposed collection of essays, Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities, will build on the critical work has been done to date to showcase DH scholarship, while expanding the focus to provide a broadly international perspective. To this end, we especially encourage scholars working outside the U.S. to consider submitting a proposal. We have an expression of interest in this project from Routledge.

 

We are looking for essays that not only describe long-term projects/large-impact projects but those that also place the work within a cultural context and what is happening in terms of DH. Finally, proposed essays should be forward looking, addressing the question(s): how does this work indicate where DH is going/where it should be going/where it could be going? Essays may take the form of case studies, if appropriate. A 300-word abstract and one-page c.v. should be submitted by January 22, 2018 to Marta Deyrup <marta.deyrup@shu.edu> and Mary Balkun <mary.balkun@shu.edu>.

 

 

TechTrends special issue on learning technologies and effect on teaching and learning process

Special issue of TechTrends related to current trends, issues, and research involving emerging learning technologies and their effects on the teaching and learning process. Both research and practitioner proposals are welcome, however, all submissions should include collected data. Additional information can be found in the Call for Chapters. Deadline is January 15, 2018.