Category Archives: Public Libraries

Pennsylvania Library Association Lehigh Valley Chapter

On Friday, May 17, 2019, the Lehigh Valley chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) will host its annual workshop/conference at Northampton Community College, Main Campus in Bethlehem, PA. We are interested in sessions that are related to public, academic, special, or school librarians.

All workshop sessions are 60 minutes in length. If you have something great to share with fellow Lehigh Valley librarians, please submit your proposal by completing this form.

Presenting at the PaLA Lehigh Valley chapter workshop benefits your professional life, builds your resume, gets your name out there, and helps you network with colleagues. Fellow librarians are excited to learn from you!

The deadline to submit proposals is Monday, December 31, 2018. Applicants will be notified by end of January, 2019. Any questions please contact Catherine Stewart, incoming Chair, at cstewart@nazarethlibrary.org.

2019 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition Poster Sessions

The 2019 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition poster session committee invites everyone to share their best ideas and work with the library community by presenting a poster session  at the 2019 ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC, on Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23, 2019.

Submissions are invited from all types of libraries and on any topic relevant to librarianship and may include a description of an innovative library program; an analysis of a  solution to a problem; a report of a research study; or any other presentation that would benefit the larger library community. Poster session participants populate boards with pictures, data, graphs, diagrams, narrative text, and more, and informally discuss their presentations with conference attendees during assigned 1 ½-hour time periods. For information on 2019 posters and the submission process, please visit this page.

The deadline for submitting an application is Friday, February 8, 2019. Applicants will be notified in late March after a double-blind peer review process, if their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. Start your application process now at https://www.conferenceabstracts.com/cfp2/login.asp?EventKey=EFRAOCJH. You must login to the site using your ALA username and password, or you can create a username and password for the site before you submit your application.

Please direct any questions about poster session presentations and submissions to Alee Navarro, the Annual Conference poster session staff liaison, anavarro@ala.org.

Best,

Valerie Bonilla
Co-Chair, ALA Poster Session

Homeschooling and Libraries

Deadline Oct. 30 for Topics

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library’s Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman& Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters (3,000-5,000 words) sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of specific programs, projects, aspects, and angles of the library role and impact on homeschooling process, families, and students, within the library walls and beyond. We are also looking for ideas (whether implemented or not) that can serve as a basis, a foundation, to incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. A tentative Table of Contents can be provided per request.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters by the same author(s); author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary or brief outline of the main talking points by October 30, 2018, with brief bio on each author; place HOM, Your Name, on subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com

Library Research Roundtable Programs ALA 2019

LRRT is now accepting proposals for programs for the 2019 ALA Annual Conference.  Research-related presentations of all kinds are encouraged.  This CFP is in addition to the competitive 2019 LRRT Research Forum which will be open later this fall.

For information about submitting a program proposal for the 2019 Annual Conference to take place in Washington, D.C., June 20-25, 2019, as well as a link to the submission site, please visit: http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2018/06/2019-ala-annual-conference-program-proposals-are-now-open

Important Dates

Call for Proposals Closes: August 31, 2018

Final Decisions: November 9, 2018

Schedule of Sessions Announced: December 5, 2018

For more information, please contact Jen Sweeney at jksweeney572@gmail.com.

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM)

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM) is a leading double-blind refereed, international journal, charting new qualitative and quantitative developments and techniques for measurement and metrics in information environments.

The journal is concerned with planning and development in libraries and the organizations of which they are part.  We invite authors to submit their original research papers related (but not limited) to the following topics:

  • Measurement, assessment and evaluation in libraries and other information environments
  • Uses of StatsQual, IT metrics, and informetrics to measure and then inform the management of libraries
  • Library and Information service value
  • The library’s role in the measurement of learning and in organisational accreditation
  • The impact and value of using social media in information services.
  • Infonomics
  • The value and impact of information/content/learning objects in education
  • The measurement and assessment of learning
  • Performance measurement and management in higher education, museums and archives
  • The use of ‘business’ and web analytics

Issue submissions should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer-review system.  Registration and access is available at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pmm.

Submissions are accepted anytime.

Editor-in-Chief

Alice L. Daugherty

The University of Alabama

padaugherty@ua.edu

 

This journal is abstracted and indexed by:

  • BFI (Denmark)
  • Current Abstracts;
  • Education Full Text;
  • INSPEC;
  • Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts;
  • Library Literature and Information Science Full Text;
  • OmniFile Full Text Mega;
  • OmniFile Full Text Select;
  • Scopus;
  • zetoc

Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations
Editors: Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2018
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Note: We use the term librarian in this call, but we do not mean to limit submissions to those with an MLS degree. All library workers are encouraged to submit chapter proposals.

Book Description


Research into the construction of librarians’ professional identities indicates a strong emphasis on our work as service providers, from both within the profession and the larger environment in which we exist. When taken to its most extreme conclusion, the service ethos that informs librarianship can turn into what some some in the field informally refer to as “Handmaiden Syndrome”– the expectation that librarians be at the beck and call of faculty, students, patrons, and administrators. This is most visible in traditional, patriarchal constructions of service that rely on hierarchical power structures, such as those present in academia and other educational and cultural institutions. But Roma Harris argues that librarianship has the potential to transform the ideal of service from one that exploits those in service roles toward a more democratic and potentially empowering exchange. To do so means an acknowledgement of the high level of emotional labor on the part of the librarian, who is constantly negotiating her sense of personal worth and professional value in pursuit of “good service.” It also raises questions about what components of identity we ignore or devalue when focusing on service as a defining feature in our profession.

This book will unpack the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and ability combine with an “ethic of service” to create, stagnate, or destruct librarians’ professional identities, sense of self, and self worth. We would like to examine the power structures, values, and contexts that influence our personal, professional, and institutional conceptions of service in libraries, as well as the costs and consequences (to ourselves and our institutions) of these very personal identity negotiations.

Possible Topics

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

Section 1: Situating Service in Librarianship
This introductory section will include a history of service values and behaviors in librarianship. It will examine the ways in which this value has been internalized by practitioners without a clear, agreed upon definition across the different subfields of librarianship.

Section 2: Intersecting Identities & Service
This section will include contributed chapters on the intersections of the ethos of service and personal identity. Questions explored may include:

• How do librarians’ personal identities influence their conception of service in libraries?
• What does service in libraries mean to you?
• In what ways do gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and/or ability influence service expectations of librarians; the ways in which service is performed/carried out; and the ways in which service is perceived by others?
• How do definitions and expectations of service shape professional identities of librarians?
• What are the consequences of not meeting service expectations? How do these consequences differ based on personal identities?
• What is the role of power in service roles and how is influenced by intersectional identity?

Section 3: Reworking the Concept of Service in Libraries
This section will attempt to redefine the concept of service in libraries through a variety of critical theoretical lenses. Contributed chapters may, for example, rework service through a feminist, critical race, or critical disability framework. We also welcome theories and perspectives from other fields. Questions explored may include:

• Do we need a new shared definition of service in libraries?
• Should we abandon the ethos of service in libraries altogether?
• If so, what other professional values should take precedence?
• How can service be redefined to promote a critical, just, and inclusive work and patron environment in libraries? Can it do this?

A variety of traditional and nontraditional scholarship methods are welcome, including but not limited to rhetorical analysis, critical analysis, lyric scholarship, autoethnography, ethnography, phenomenological research, interviews, and other methods of exploring personal and collective identity and the ethos of service.

Timeline
• CFP distributed: April 2, 2018
• Deadline for Chapter Proposals: July 15, 2018
• Notification of Accepted Chapter Proposals: October 1, 2018
• First drafts due: January 15, 2019
• Second drafts due: March 15, 2019
• Final drafts due: June 1, 2019
• Editing: June-August 2019
• Submission of final manuscript: September 1, 2019

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to serviceinlibrariesbook@gmail.com

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter examines the ethos of service in libraries in relation to identity, and/or a larger theoretical framework. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss service in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby, editors, at varellano@gmail.com or jogadsby@gmail.com.

Homeschooling and Libraries

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library’s Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters (3,000-5,000 words) sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of specific programs, projects, aspects, and angles of the library role and impact on homeschooling process, families, and students, within the library walls and beyond. We are also looking for ideas (whether implemented or not) that can serve as a basis, a foundation, to incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. A tentative Table of Contents can be provided per request.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters by the same author(s); author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary or brief outline of the main talking points by July 28, 2018, with brief bio on each author; place HOM, Your Name, on subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com

5th Annual LILi Conference: It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

5th Annual LILi Conference  Friday, August 17, 2018, 9 am – 1:30 pm Glendale Public Library 222 E Harvard St, Glendale, CA 91205

It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

Proposal Deadline: Friday, April 20, 2018

How has your library fostered information empowerment among its users? LILi invites you to share your library or program’s innovative teachable moments by submitting proposals with practical applications. Lifelong learning and information literacy (IL) development occurs in countless contexts and communities, within and outside the library. Given the skills required to compete in a rapidly changing modern knowledge economy, we can learn from our colleagues in all types of libraries. Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following, all as related to information empowerment:

  • Community outreach and organizing strategies
  • DIY publications (e.g., zines, podcasts, blogs, apps) and other knowledge sharing creations
  • Programming for various populations, including children, teens, seniors, immigrants, English language learners, and other marginalized groups
  • Workshops, one-shots, credit courses, and training sessions supporting students/users/patrons in online and face-to-face settings
  • Community archiving
  • Metaliteracy
  • Data Literacy
  • Digital citizenship
  • Makerspace and escape room activities that foster transferable problem solving skills
  • Open educational resource (OER) and open pedagogy initiatives

LILi invites you to submit proposals with practical application and built-in audience interaction by April 20, 2018 for a 15-minute presentation. Notification of acceptance by May 18, 2018.

Submit proposals here: http://bit.ly/2GT4pzB

LILi Conference Code of Conduct: http://campusguides.glendale.edu/lili/ConductCode

Questions? Annie Knight (knight_annie@sac.edu) or Susie Chin (schin@glendale.edu)

Catholic Library World

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World. 

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries. 

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission. 

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented. 

For more information, please visit this website: https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications 

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, sigridkelsey@gmail.com 

Neglected Newberys: A Critical Reassessment at the Centennial

Volume editors: Sara L. Schwebel and Jocelyn Van Tuyl

In anticipation of the one hundredth anniversary of the American Library Association’s Newbery Medal (1922-2022), submissions are welcomed for a volume devoted to critically-neglected Newbery Award-winners.

About the Volume

Since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922, Newbery novels have had an outsized influence on American children’s literature, figuring perennially on publisher’s lists, on library and bookstore shelves, and in K-12 school curricula. As such, they offer a compelling window into the history of U.S. children’s literature and publishing as well as changing societal attitudes about what books are “best” for American children. Nevertheless, many Newbery Award winners—even the most popular and frequently taught titles—have attracted scant critical attention.

This volume offers a critically- and historically-grounded analysis of representative Newbery Medal books and interrogates the disjunction between the books’ omnipresence and influence, on the one hand, and the critical silence surrounding them, on the other.

The editors seek at least one previously unpublished essay per decade (1920s-2010s), with each essay to focus primarily on a single Newbery Medal (not Newbery Honor) title for which little or no literary scholarship exists. We welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

We specifically seek a diversity of Newbery authors, genres, themes, and book settings, but also investigations of how diversity is treated or, especially for earlier works, silenced in the texts.

Avenues for exploration include: neglected categories and sub-genres (horse books, maritime adventure stories, regional literature, retold folktales, one-hit wonders for children by well-known authors); reception and book history (alterations of text to avoid offensive language and imagery, both immediately after the Medal and decades later); critical readings of problematic texts; Newbery winners and their archives; hypotheses regarding critical neglect: the rise of Children’s Literature as an academic field long after the Medal’s inception; the disjunction between the Newbery’s historical whiteness and heteronormativity and current developments in literary criticism; a possible disconnect between librarians who award the medal, K-12 teachers who recommend the books, and university professors who are rewarded for publishing literary criticism.

Submission Information

E-mail the editors (schwebel@sc.edu and vantuyl@ncf.edu) for access to the spreadsheet of books on which we are soliciting contributions, contributor resources, and additional specifications to ensure continuity throughout the volume.

Deadline

The deadline for initial proposals of approximately 500 words is April 1, 2018.

We anticipate requesting completed essays of 6000-7000 words by early 2019 (subject to the publisher’s requirements).