Category Archives: Public Libraries

2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

WORK: GSISC 18

 

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

Urban Librarians Unite Conference

April 13th, 2018

@ Brooklyn Public Library

Theme: Library Revolution!

Submission deadline: December 28th, 2017

Do you see the revolution taking place in public libraries?  Are you helping change how we deliver information and services to patrons?  Have you been pushing the field into the 21st Century?  Have you been doing this all with limited funding?  On April 13th, Urban Librarians Unite will be holding Library Revolution! our 6th Annual Urban Librarians Unite conference at Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Library.

For Library Revolution! we are looking for the librarians who starting a revolution in their library world. It’s been a year of insane upheaval, what changes have you made in your library? How have you responded to community needs, technological changes or even just something in your day to day work? How have you fomented revolution?

We are looking for twelve speakers – Four main auditorium sessions and eight smaller “Break-out” sessions. All sessions will be an hour and a half long and will focus on a Library Revolution. Examples of what we’ve done before can be found here. We are looking for topics about the Library Revolution including but not limited to:

  • Changing how the public view libraries and/or librarians
  • Reaching out to diverse communities and changing services
  • Impact of current events on library trends
  • Innovation and changes in roles, responsibilities, services and resources
  • Impact of technology
  • Leadership and leadership development
  • Leading through Change
  • Diversity & inclusion
  • Career planning, professional development
  • Post-truth information literacy, and digital literacy
  • Civic engagement, partnerships, and community building
  • Librarians as knowledge gatekeepers, personal freedom, and privacy

Please submit your proposal via the attached form. We require a title and short description.

Proposals will be due December 28th. For questions please email us at urbanlibrariansunite@gmail.com

3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018: Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community

Call for Proposals

Deadline November 15, 2017

Submit proposals here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference is promoted by the Joint Council for Librarians of Color whose purpose is “To promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and to host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color every four to five years.”

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision makers interested in exploring inclusive policies and practices in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC strives to deepen connections across constituencies, create spaces for dialogue, promote the telling and celebrating of one’s stories, and encourage the transformation of libraries into more democratic and diverse organizations. This conference is sponsored by the five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association: the American Indian Library Association (AILA), Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA). JCLC 2018 follows the first gathering in 2006 in Dallas, TX and the second in 2012 in Kansas City, MO.

The 2018 JCLC Steering Committee invites you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community”. Proposal submission deadlines are listed below.

What’s on the page:

JCLC Tracks and Topics

JCLC 2018 seeks conference session presentations in all areas of diversity, including, but not limited to, the topics below, focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.” Ideal sessions will provide:

  • Insights, skills, tools, and strategies that stress solutions, implementation, and practical applications
  • Highlight exemplary programs, approaches, and models
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, and understanding around significant issues affecting conference constituencies
  • Discuss efforts to create more inclusive environments, curricula, and programs.

The Program Committee will strive to select a balance of academic, school, tribal, special, and public libraries learning opportunities.

  • Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration
    Marketing; outreach to diverse populations; community collaborations; user spaces; public policy; health education; using census data and other government information; cultural programming; services to and rebuilding of communities hit with disaster; research; undocumented, urban, rural and low-income communities; etc.
  • Collections, Programs and Services
    Ethnic and multicultural collections; film and music; information literacy; children’s, youth and adult programming; programs for diverse populations; reference; instruction; grant funded programs; technical services; archives; preservation; digital inclusion; documenting traditional knowledge; research; cataloging/subject headings/controlled vocabulary; etc.
  • Bridge Building, Intersectionality and Inclusion
    Fostering awareness, acceptance, and inclusion of all communities; disabilities; gender; celebrating elders; religion; sexual orientation/LGBTQIA populations; nationality; sharing traditional knowledge; serving the incarcerated; immigrant and refugees; cross cultural issues; transnational communities; multiculturalism; best practices and model programs promoting bridge building, intersectionality, and inclusion; microaggressions; cultural humility; etc.
  • Leadership, Management and Organizational Development
    Administration; staff development/training; recruitment and retention; leadership; organizational culture; management; cultural competencies; mentoring; assessment; mid-career strategies; staff and paraprofessional issues; conflict resolution and mediation; reorganization and restructuring; leading during tight economic times; institutional change; research; fundraising; institutional racism; breaking the glass ceiling; etc.
  • Technology and Innovation
    Teaching and learning; emerging technologies; e-repositories; social networking applications; digitization; equal access for users; library tools; e-books; mobile devices; widgets; mashups; online learning and collaboration; open access movements; social aspects of technology and implications for use; videos; etc.

Session Formats

All sessions are 75 minutes long with the exception of preconferences (Preconference programs may be either 4 or 8 hours) and may take one of the following formats:

  • Panel Presentation
  • Individual Paper/Presentation
  • Roundtable
  • Workshop
  • Poster Session
  • Film with discussion
  • Preconferences

JCLC will also accept proposals in different formats (other than those listed above) that will excite, engage, and create a new learning environment for conference attendees. Proposals may be accepted on the condition of combining proposed sessions into a single session with other proposals or as a different format than originally accepted.

Prohibited Submissions

Program proposals promoting or selling products/services during conference sessions will not be accepted.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on November 15, 2017. No late submissions will be accepted. Notifications of proposal selection will be made on a rolling basis beginning on January 15, 2018 and ending on February 15, 2018.

Selection Criteria

All proposals will be reviewed by the JCLC Program Committee. Proposals are evaluated on quality and clarity of content, uniqueness of topic, relevance to conference attendees, ability to engage the audience, and the relationship of the proposal to the mission and theme of the conference, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.”
All presenters of selected programs must register for the conference. Only registered participants will be allowed to present.

Proceedings

JCLC will encourage the selected conference presenters, in all formats, to publish their content using the online conference program application. The content will be directly linked to the program abstract and remain posted for one year. It is recommended that all program content be uploaded by the day of the presentation. Authors will retain copyright to their original work and are encouraged to publish their content in other established venues.

Submission site

Please submit your proposal here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

Questions

Many questions can be answered on the FAQ. Questions not answered in the FAQs may be sent to the JCLC Programs Committee at jclc2018programs@gmail.com.


The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Call for Chapters:

Working Title: The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Editors: Darren Chase & Dana Haugh

Submission Deadline: December 1st

Publisher: ALA Editions


Book Description

This peer-reviewed collection will bring together a dynamic set of librarians, scholars, practitioners, policy makers and thinkers in order to take measure of the open access movement. Critical essays, research, case studies and other pieces will create a substantial, far-reaching text.  This collection will be critical and practical, and provide practical examples and theory in understanding the open access movement, open data, open educational resources, open knowledge, and the opportunity for an open and transformed world.


More and more universities–often spearheaded by university libraries–are adopting open access policies as a practical way to promote open access and further the research enterprise, while countering the often closed, restrictive and costly scholarly journals and databases.  This book will provide a substantial and practical overview of the open access movement, along with critical essays and consideration of the meaning of open access and its potential to leverage existing technology to transform how we support, share and access research.


We are looking for case studies, research, and critical essays on various aspects of open access scholarship, including:


  • Library Open Access Initiatives (implementations, challenges, processes, training, promotion/outreach, etc.)

  • Open Access Publishers & Journals (reception, evaluation measures, predatory publishers)

  • Repositories (green open access, university-specific, network of open repositories, discipline-specific platforms)

  • Open Educational Resources (current landscape, value/usage, challenges)

  • Open Data (data repositories, linked data, metadata, research data management)

  • Publishing Models (gold open access, new models, university presses, peer-review etc)

  • Research consortia, governmental & NGO initiatives

  • Public access to publically-funded research

  • University policies on open access (issues of mandatory vs. voluntary, on-boarding faculty/staff, creating buy-in, etc.)

  • Future of open access

  • Other areas of open scholarship


Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: December 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 15, 2017


Submissions

Please use this form to submit abstracts of 200-500 words.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter relates to open scholarship. Multiple submissions are welcome. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 3,000-5,000 word range (some exceptions will be made for longer chapters). Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Please direct any questions to Darren Chase (darren.chase@stonybrook.edu) or Dana Haugh (dana.haugh@stonybrook.edu)


About the editors

Darren Chase is Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University.  His research interests include open access, crowdfunded research, online learning, digital badging and information literacy. Darren has written and presented widely on myriad scholarly publishing topics.  He spearheaded the development and eventual adoption of the Stony Brook University Open Access Policy, and coordinates the annual Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium.


Dana Haugh is Web Services Librarian at Stony Brook University Libraries where she leads the design and development of the library’s web presences. Her research interests include web design, open access, marketing & outreach in libraries, and information literacy. Dana has extensive experience writing for top journals and monographs in the library field. She’s particularly focused on ensuring scholarship is openly accessible and helps manage her university’s institutional repository which promotes open access to scholarship published by Stony Brook University faculty.

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided

CALL FOR CHAPTER CONTRIBUTORS

The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and
beyond.

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.
Trump

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or
contemporarily

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT (hbmgpt@rit.edu) by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration
elsewhere.

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

PaLA Conference Poster Sessions

October 15 – 18, 2017
DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh – GreenTree
We hope you will plan to attend the Pennsylvania Library Association Annual Conference to take place at the DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh–Greentree, located in a Pittsburgh suburb with close proximity to city attractions.  The PaLA Conference offers numerous ways to further your career with innovative educational programming and opportunities to network with your peers in the library community. 

Poster sessions provide an informal forum for library professionals from across the state to share their successful program ideas or innovations with colleagues. An effective poster presentation highlights, with visual display, the main points or components of your topic; the presenter fills in the details verbally and answers questions from those viewing the poster. The object is to gather feedback and to make connections with others interested in the same subject. If you have an idea for a program or study that you’d like to share, we invite you to present a poster!

The deadline for submission of poster proposals is Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

For more information about the conference, and to access the link to the session proposal form, visit the 2017 Conference Information Page.

Thank you in advance to all that submit proposals, we appreciate your dedication to PaLA and to Pennsylvania’s libraries!

Teens and Tweens: What they need from us and we want from them

The Southwest Chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association is seeking presenters for its spring workshop, “Teens and Tweens: What they need from us and we want from them.”

Tweens are considered to be between the age of 10-12 and teens are 13-19.  Interacting with them has an impact on all types of librarians.  For school librarians, these students span the world between children’s and young adult resources as they learn how to access and process information. For public librarians, serving this group runs the gamut from collection development to programming. For academic librarians, how public and school librarians serve these groups determines how prepared for college work they are when they arrive as freshman. Presenters should consider how to meet the needs of this age group while presenting on best practices for bridging the transition from pre-adolescent – to teen – to adult.

Presentations are open to school, public, and academic librarians. To submit a workshop proposal click here… https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SWChapterspringworkshop2017

Deadline for proposal submission is March 17, 2017

2017 Association for Rural & Small Libraries Conference

The Call for Proposals for the 2017 Association for Rural & Small Libraries Conference is now open!  (The conference s being held in St. George, Utah, September 6-9th).

Do you know of a great program or innovative project that will help take libraries to the next level?  Our theme for this year’s conference is Libraries Elevated and we would love to see topics that take libraries from ordinary to extraordinary. 

 

Submissions for both 1 hour programs and Full/Half Day Preconference workshops are being accepted.  Proposals are due by March 15, 2017.

Please fill out this form to submit your proposal.

American Library Association’s Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) Webinars

Do you have a great idea for a webinar? Share your passions with the profession! The American Library Association’s Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS) welcomes submissions of various topics for our future webinars.  We are especially interested in – but not limited to – areas related to Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach.

Criteria

Successful online webinar proposals should:
  • Name all presenters with relative teaching experience
  • Provide a 250 word description
  • Be aligned with the standards and competencies for diversity.
  • Show plans for presentations allotted for either 60 or 90 minutes.
  •  Clearly outlines learning outcomes for the ODLOS target audience.
  •  Illustrate how the webinar will address a topic of interest for ODLOS.

Topics

Diversity
  • Advocacy
    • Valuing Diversity
    •  Recruitment for Diversity
  • Race
  • Micro-aggressions and Inclusion
  •  LGBT and Gender
  •  Feminism/combating sexism
  • Disability
  • Cultural Competency
    • Intercultural communications
  •  Class
    • Social- economic justice
    • Equity
Literacy
  • Family Literacy
    •  Literacy Across A Lifespan
  •  Adult Education
    •  Employment Recruitment
    •  Employment Services
  •  English Language Learning
    •  Citizenship and Immigration
Outreach
  • Community Organizing and Peace Building
  • Organizational and Institutional Change
  •  Recruitment and Retention
  • Serving Traditionally Underserved Populations

Submission Form

To submit a proposal, complete the online submissions form.

Contact

ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services
50 E. Huron St.
Chicago, Illinois 60611
1-800-545-2433 ext. 4294
Fax: 312-280-3256
Email: diversity@ala.org