Category Archives: Public Libraries

Catholic Library World

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World. 

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries. 

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission. 

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented. 

For more information, please visit this website: 

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, 

Neglected Newberys: A Critical Reassessment at the Centennial

Volume editors: Sara L. Schwebel and Jocelyn Van Tuyl

In anticipation of the one hundredth anniversary of the American Library Association’s Newbery Medal (1922-2022), submissions are welcomed for a volume devoted to critically-neglected Newbery Award-winners.

About the Volume

Since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922, Newbery novels have had an outsized influence on American children’s literature, figuring perennially on publisher’s lists, on library and bookstore shelves, and in K-12 school curricula. As such, they offer a compelling window into the history of U.S. children’s literature and publishing as well as changing societal attitudes about what books are “best” for American children. Nevertheless, many Newbery Award winners—even the most popular and frequently taught titles—have attracted scant critical attention.

This volume offers a critically- and historically-grounded analysis of representative Newbery Medal books and interrogates the disjunction between the books’ omnipresence and influence, on the one hand, and the critical silence surrounding them, on the other.

The editors seek at least one previously unpublished essay per decade (1920s-2010s), with each essay to focus primarily on a single Newbery Medal (not Newbery Honor) title for which little or no literary scholarship exists. We welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

We specifically seek a diversity of Newbery authors, genres, themes, and book settings, but also investigations of how diversity is treated or, especially for earlier works, silenced in the texts.

Avenues for exploration include: neglected categories and sub-genres (horse books, maritime adventure stories, regional literature, retold folktales, one-hit wonders for children by well-known authors); reception and book history (alterations of text to avoid offensive language and imagery, both immediately after the Medal and decades later); critical readings of problematic texts; Newbery winners and their archives; hypotheses regarding critical neglect: the rise of Children’s Literature as an academic field long after the Medal’s inception; the disjunction between the Newbery’s historical whiteness and heteronormativity and current developments in literary criticism; a possible disconnect between librarians who award the medal, K-12 teachers who recommend the books, and university professors who are rewarded for publishing literary criticism.

Submission Information

E-mail the editors ( and for access to the spreadsheet of books on which we are soliciting contributions, contributor resources, and additional specifications to ensure continuity throughout the volume.


The deadline for initial proposals of approximately 500 words is April 1, 2018.

We anticipate requesting completed essays of 6000-7000 words by early 2019 (subject to the publisher’s requirements).

Library Trends : Disabled Adults in Libraries

Issue title: Disabled Adults in Libraries (title is intentional)
Submission deadline: January 1, 2018
Co-editors: Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich
Submit to:
Publication date: May 2019

Nature and scope of this issue:

Though scholarship about disabilities has been robust in various social science and humanities disciplines for decades, libraries have been slow to theorize or systematically examine the experiences of dis/ability in libraries. This special issue will be geared toward the experience of being a Disabled adult in libraries, as user or worker. Through a mixture of empirical research, case studies, interviews, and theoretical papers, this issue will capture perspectives of Disabled members of our broad library community.

There are many possible approaches one can take to examine disabilities and disability theory. The approach guiding this issue is taken from an in-press work by one of the editors.

There is no universally accepted definition of disabilities or single approach to disability theory. Legalistic definitions, including those presented in the Americans with Disabilities Act and the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities tend to be exclusionary and restrictive in their ideations about humanity. By this, I mean that in their construction of disability and disabled people, they work from a deficit model in which disabled humans are treated as corporeal abnormalities. However, if one out of every seven human beings could be considered disabled, as research demonstrates, disability is a common part of human existence. For many of us, when we talk about in/accessibility in libraries, we’re not just talking about things that others experience; we’re talking about ourselves.

Critical disability studies (CDS) is one approach that offers a way of including disabled people in academic discourse. In this approach, disabled people are participants and researchers who can engage in self-reflexive critiques, not just objects of study. While some theoretical models focus on binary categories that are presented in contrast to each other, such as contrasting social and medical models or disability and impairment, CDS scholars focus on the entire lived experiences of disabled people. This allows for more complicated modes of analysis, such as acknowledging that disabilities may include both social and medical aspects.

We are intentionally seeking out reviewers and authors who have diverse experiences and backgrounds, including library workers of color, library workers who have LGBTQIA+ identities, and those who have Disabled identities. Because we anticipate that several authors will have experience both as Disabled library workers and as Disabled library users, we want to allow either or both perspectives to be incorporated into their research. However, to provide some limits on the scope of this issue, we are focusing on the library experiences of Disabled adults.

January 1, 2018 Article proposals are due
February 1, 2018 Editors will notify people if proposals are accepted
June 1, 2018 Article drafts are due
August 1, 2018 Reviewer feedback will be sent
September/October 2018 Final edits
November 1, 2018 Final manuscripts are due to the publisher

The writing style follows Chicago rules. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the style rules can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal requirements:

A complete proposal will include the following:

  • abstract of proposed article (200-300 words is preferred)
  • a short author biography — it doesn’t have to be formal at this point; we welcome casual explanations of how your background and experience influences your desire to write in this area

Submit to

If you need help with your abstract or framing your article, the Article Framework Questions used by In the Library with the Lead Pipe are very helpful:

If you plan to include statistical analysis, please let us know how you will ensure that your methodology and analysis are solid.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Jessica Schomberg, co-editor
Shanna Hollich, co-editor

Politics of Libraries Conference

April 23, 2017
University of Alberta – School of Library and Information Studies

The spring of 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the turbulent spring of 1968 where social and political movements resulted in protests and strikes across many Western democracies. In France in May of 1968, where unrest was most pointed, some declared the month to be the “début d’une lutte prolongée” or “beginning of a prolonged struggle.” While the protests and strikes seemed to indicate a progressive momentum in the waning period of the so-called ‘golden era’ of the Fordist social contract, the response to the social protests of 1968 (and political radicalism that followed) was the emergence of economic and political neoliberalism. Looking back on 50 years since 1968, we aim to question not what failed in the spring of 1968 nor how a new political and economic order arose, but what is the state of the politics of libraries in 2018? What struggles continue and what new ones must be undertaken?

Reflecting on this 50th anniversary, an interested group of librarians, information professionals, students, and academics is hosting a conference questioning the politics of libraries in 2018, discussed over one day in April 2018 at the University of Alberta. In the spirit of 1968, we invite practitioners, scholars, activists, students, and other members of the general public interested in library allied information services to submit proposals on the issue of the politics of libraries in 2018. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Neutrality in libraries
  • Hegemonic and counter-hegemonic roles of libraries
  • Resistance in library services and work
  • Neoliberalism and its relationship to libraries
  • Precarity in library work

Please submit proposals (not to exceed 400 words) for individual (20 minute presentations) and group/panel contributions using this form by midnight January 30, 2018.

All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process undertaken by the conference organizers. Notification on the status of submissions will be made by mid-February, 2018.

2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15:



How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at

Urban Librarians Unite Conference

April 13th, 2018

@ Brooklyn Public Library

Theme: Library Revolution!

Submission deadline: December 28th, 2017

Do you see the revolution taking place in public libraries?  Are you helping change how we deliver information and services to patrons?  Have you been pushing the field into the 21st Century?  Have you been doing this all with limited funding?  On April 13th, Urban Librarians Unite will be holding Library Revolution! our 6th Annual Urban Librarians Unite conference at Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Library.

For Library Revolution! we are looking for the librarians who starting a revolution in their library world. It’s been a year of insane upheaval, what changes have you made in your library? How have you responded to community needs, technological changes or even just something in your day to day work? How have you fomented revolution?

We are looking for twelve speakers – Four main auditorium sessions and eight smaller “Break-out” sessions. All sessions will be an hour and a half long and will focus on a Library Revolution. Examples of what we’ve done before can be found here. We are looking for topics about the Library Revolution including but not limited to:

  • Changing how the public view libraries and/or librarians
  • Reaching out to diverse communities and changing services
  • Impact of current events on library trends
  • Innovation and changes in roles, responsibilities, services and resources
  • Impact of technology
  • Leadership and leadership development
  • Leading through Change
  • Diversity & inclusion
  • Career planning, professional development
  • Post-truth information literacy, and digital literacy
  • Civic engagement, partnerships, and community building
  • Librarians as knowledge gatekeepers, personal freedom, and privacy

Please submit your proposal via the attached form. We require a title and short description.

Proposals will be due December 28th. For questions please email us at

3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018: Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community

Call for Proposals

Deadline November 15, 2017

Submit proposals here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference is promoted by the Joint Council for Librarians of Color whose purpose is “To promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and to host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color every four to five years.”

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision makers interested in exploring inclusive policies and practices in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC strives to deepen connections across constituencies, create spaces for dialogue, promote the telling and celebrating of one’s stories, and encourage the transformation of libraries into more democratic and diverse organizations. This conference is sponsored by the five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association: the American Indian Library Association (AILA), Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA). JCLC 2018 follows the first gathering in 2006 in Dallas, TX and the second in 2012 in Kansas City, MO.

The 2018 JCLC Steering Committee invites you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community”. Proposal submission deadlines are listed below.

What’s on the page:

JCLC Tracks and Topics

JCLC 2018 seeks conference session presentations in all areas of diversity, including, but not limited to, the topics below, focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.” Ideal sessions will provide:

  • Insights, skills, tools, and strategies that stress solutions, implementation, and practical applications
  • Highlight exemplary programs, approaches, and models
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, and understanding around significant issues affecting conference constituencies
  • Discuss efforts to create more inclusive environments, curricula, and programs.

The Program Committee will strive to select a balance of academic, school, tribal, special, and public libraries learning opportunities.

  • Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration
    Marketing; outreach to diverse populations; community collaborations; user spaces; public policy; health education; using census data and other government information; cultural programming; services to and rebuilding of communities hit with disaster; research; undocumented, urban, rural and low-income communities; etc.
  • Collections, Programs and Services
    Ethnic and multicultural collections; film and music; information literacy; children’s, youth and adult programming; programs for diverse populations; reference; instruction; grant funded programs; technical services; archives; preservation; digital inclusion; documenting traditional knowledge; research; cataloging/subject headings/controlled vocabulary; etc.
  • Bridge Building, Intersectionality and Inclusion
    Fostering awareness, acceptance, and inclusion of all communities; disabilities; gender; celebrating elders; religion; sexual orientation/LGBTQIA populations; nationality; sharing traditional knowledge; serving the incarcerated; immigrant and refugees; cross cultural issues; transnational communities; multiculturalism; best practices and model programs promoting bridge building, intersectionality, and inclusion; microaggressions; cultural humility; etc.
  • Leadership, Management and Organizational Development
    Administration; staff development/training; recruitment and retention; leadership; organizational culture; management; cultural competencies; mentoring; assessment; mid-career strategies; staff and paraprofessional issues; conflict resolution and mediation; reorganization and restructuring; leading during tight economic times; institutional change; research; fundraising; institutional racism; breaking the glass ceiling; etc.
  • Technology and Innovation
    Teaching and learning; emerging technologies; e-repositories; social networking applications; digitization; equal access for users; library tools; e-books; mobile devices; widgets; mashups; online learning and collaboration; open access movements; social aspects of technology and implications for use; videos; etc.

Session Formats

All sessions are 75 minutes long with the exception of preconferences (Preconference programs may be either 4 or 8 hours) and may take one of the following formats:

  • Panel Presentation
  • Individual Paper/Presentation
  • Roundtable
  • Workshop
  • Poster Session
  • Film with discussion
  • Preconferences

JCLC will also accept proposals in different formats (other than those listed above) that will excite, engage, and create a new learning environment for conference attendees. Proposals may be accepted on the condition of combining proposed sessions into a single session with other proposals or as a different format than originally accepted.

Prohibited Submissions

Program proposals promoting or selling products/services during conference sessions will not be accepted.


All proposals must be received by midnight PST on November 15, 2017. No late submissions will be accepted. Notifications of proposal selection will be made on a rolling basis beginning on January 15, 2018 and ending on February 15, 2018.

Selection Criteria

All proposals will be reviewed by the JCLC Program Committee. Proposals are evaluated on quality and clarity of content, uniqueness of topic, relevance to conference attendees, ability to engage the audience, and the relationship of the proposal to the mission and theme of the conference, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.”
All presenters of selected programs must register for the conference. Only registered participants will be allowed to present.


JCLC will encourage the selected conference presenters, in all formats, to publish their content using the online conference program application. The content will be directly linked to the program abstract and remain posted for one year. It is recommended that all program content be uploaded by the day of the presentation. Authors will retain copyright to their original work and are encouraged to publish their content in other established venues.

Submission site

Please submit your proposal here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site


Many questions can be answered on the FAQ. Questions not answered in the FAQs may be sent to the JCLC Programs Committee at

The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Call for Chapters:

Working Title: The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Editors: Darren Chase & Dana Haugh

Submission Deadline: December 1st

Publisher: ALA Editions

Book Description

This peer-reviewed collection will bring together a dynamic set of librarians, scholars, practitioners, policy makers and thinkers in order to take measure of the open access movement. Critical essays, research, case studies and other pieces will create a substantial, far-reaching text.  This collection will be critical and practical, and provide practical examples and theory in understanding the open access movement, open data, open educational resources, open knowledge, and the opportunity for an open and transformed world.

More and more universities–often spearheaded by university libraries–are adopting open access policies as a practical way to promote open access and further the research enterprise, while countering the often closed, restrictive and costly scholarly journals and databases.  This book will provide a substantial and practical overview of the open access movement, along with critical essays and consideration of the meaning of open access and its potential to leverage existing technology to transform how we support, share and access research.

We are looking for case studies, research, and critical essays on various aspects of open access scholarship, including:

  • Library Open Access Initiatives (implementations, challenges, processes, training, promotion/outreach, etc.)

  • Open Access Publishers & Journals (reception, evaluation measures, predatory publishers)

  • Repositories (green open access, university-specific, network of open repositories, discipline-specific platforms)

  • Open Educational Resources (current landscape, value/usage, challenges)

  • Open Data (data repositories, linked data, metadata, research data management)

  • Publishing Models (gold open access, new models, university presses, peer-review etc)

  • Research consortia, governmental & NGO initiatives

  • Public access to publically-funded research

  • University policies on open access (issues of mandatory vs. voluntary, on-boarding faculty/staff, creating buy-in, etc.)

  • Future of open access

  • Other areas of open scholarship


Abstract submission deadline: December 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 15, 2017


Please use this form to submit abstracts of 200-500 words.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter relates to open scholarship. Multiple submissions are welcome. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 3,000-5,000 word range (some exceptions will be made for longer chapters). Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Please direct any questions to Darren Chase ( or Dana Haugh (

About the editors

Darren Chase is Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University.  His research interests include open access, crowdfunded research, online learning, digital badging and information literacy. Darren has written and presented widely on myriad scholarly publishing topics.  He spearheaded the development and eventual adoption of the Stony Brook University Open Access Policy, and coordinates the annual Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium.

Dana Haugh is Web Services Librarian at Stony Brook University Libraries where she leads the design and development of the library’s web presences. Her research interests include web design, open access, marketing & outreach in libraries, and information literacy. Dana has extensive experience writing for top journals and monographs in the library field. She’s particularly focused on ensuring scholarship is openly accessible and helps manage her university’s institutional repository which promotes open access to scholarship published by Stony Brook University faculty.

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided


The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT ( by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website:
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue:
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors,, and/or Cheryl Branch