Category Archives: Special Libraries

Pennsylvania Library Association Lehigh Valley Chapter

On Friday, May 17, 2019, the Lehigh Valley chapter of the Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) will host its annual workshop/conference at Northampton Community College, Main Campus in Bethlehem, PA. We are interested in sessions that are related to public, academic, special, or school librarians.

All workshop sessions are 60 minutes in length. If you have something great to share with fellow Lehigh Valley librarians, please submit your proposal by completing this form.

Presenting at the PaLA Lehigh Valley chapter workshop benefits your professional life, builds your resume, gets your name out there, and helps you network with colleagues. Fellow librarians are excited to learn from you!

The deadline to submit proposals is Monday, December 31, 2018. Applicants will be notified by end of January, 2019. Any questions please contact Catherine Stewart, incoming Chair, at cstewart@nazarethlibrary.org.

2019 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition Poster Sessions

The 2019 ALA Annual Conference & Exhibition poster session committee invites everyone to share their best ideas and work with the library community by presenting a poster session  at the 2019 ALA Annual Conference in Washington, DC, on Saturday, June 22, and Sunday, June 23, 2019.

Submissions are invited from all types of libraries and on any topic relevant to librarianship and may include a description of an innovative library program; an analysis of a  solution to a problem; a report of a research study; or any other presentation that would benefit the larger library community. Poster session participants populate boards with pictures, data, graphs, diagrams, narrative text, and more, and informally discuss their presentations with conference attendees during assigned 1 ½-hour time periods. For information on 2019 posters and the submission process, please visit this page.

The deadline for submitting an application is Friday, February 8, 2019. Applicants will be notified in late March after a double-blind peer review process, if their submission has been accepted for presentation at the conference. Start your application process now at https://www.conferenceabstracts.com/cfp2/login.asp?EventKey=EFRAOCJH. You must login to the site using your ALA username and password, or you can create a username and password for the site before you submit your application.

Please direct any questions about poster session presentations and submissions to Alee Navarro, the Annual Conference poster session staff liaison, anavarro@ala.org.

Best,

Valerie Bonilla
Co-Chair, ALA Poster Session

Library Research Roundtable Programs ALA 2019

LRRT is now accepting proposals for programs for the 2019 ALA Annual Conference.  Research-related presentations of all kinds are encouraged.  This CFP is in addition to the competitive 2019 LRRT Research Forum which will be open later this fall.

For information about submitting a program proposal for the 2019 Annual Conference to take place in Washington, D.C., June 20-25, 2019, as well as a link to the submission site, please visit: http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2018/06/2019-ala-annual-conference-program-proposals-are-now-open

Important Dates

Call for Proposals Closes: August 31, 2018

Final Decisions: November 9, 2018

Schedule of Sessions Announced: December 5, 2018

For more information, please contact Jen Sweeney at jksweeney572@gmail.com.

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM)

Performance Measurement and Metrics (PMM) is a leading double-blind refereed, international journal, charting new qualitative and quantitative developments and techniques for measurement and metrics in information environments.

The journal is concerned with planning and development in libraries and the organizations of which they are part.  We invite authors to submit their original research papers related (but not limited) to the following topics:

  • Measurement, assessment and evaluation in libraries and other information environments
  • Uses of StatsQual, IT metrics, and informetrics to measure and then inform the management of libraries
  • Library and Information service value
  • The library’s role in the measurement of learning and in organisational accreditation
  • The impact and value of using social media in information services.
  • Infonomics
  • The value and impact of information/content/learning objects in education
  • The measurement and assessment of learning
  • Performance measurement and management in higher education, museums and archives
  • The use of ‘business’ and web analytics

Issue submissions should be made through ScholarOne Manuscripts, the online submission and peer-review system.  Registration and access is available at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/pmm.

Submissions are accepted anytime.

Editor-in-Chief

Alice L. Daugherty

The University of Alabama

padaugherty@ua.edu

 

This journal is abstracted and indexed by:

  • BFI (Denmark)
  • Current Abstracts;
  • Education Full Text;
  • INSPEC;
  • Library, Information Science and Technology Abstracts;
  • Library Literature and Information Science Full Text;
  • OmniFile Full Text Mega;
  • OmniFile Full Text Select;
  • Scopus;
  • zetoc

ALA Annual 2019 juried submissions

ALA Annual

Washington, DC

June 20-25, 2019

The submission site for juried programs at ALA Annual 2019 is now open. For information and deadlines, please refer to the release at http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2018/06/2019-ala-annual-conference-program-proposals-are-now-open.

Direct Link to the submission site: https://www.conferenceabstracts.com/cfp2/login.asp?EventKey=SKJSWSLA

Updated Schedule:

  • Submission Site Opens: June 1, 2018
  • Submission Site Closes: August 31, 2018
  • Final Decisions: November 9, 2018
  • Schedule of Sessions Announced: December 5, 2018

 

Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations
Editors: Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2018
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Note: We use the term librarian in this call, but we do not mean to limit submissions to those with an MLS degree. All library workers are encouraged to submit chapter proposals.

Book Description


Research into the construction of librarians’ professional identities indicates a strong emphasis on our work as service providers, from both within the profession and the larger environment in which we exist. When taken to its most extreme conclusion, the service ethos that informs librarianship can turn into what some some in the field informally refer to as “Handmaiden Syndrome”– the expectation that librarians be at the beck and call of faculty, students, patrons, and administrators. This is most visible in traditional, patriarchal constructions of service that rely on hierarchical power structures, such as those present in academia and other educational and cultural institutions. But Roma Harris argues that librarianship has the potential to transform the ideal of service from one that exploits those in service roles toward a more democratic and potentially empowering exchange. To do so means an acknowledgement of the high level of emotional labor on the part of the librarian, who is constantly negotiating her sense of personal worth and professional value in pursuit of “good service.” It also raises questions about what components of identity we ignore or devalue when focusing on service as a defining feature in our profession.

This book will unpack the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and ability combine with an “ethic of service” to create, stagnate, or destruct librarians’ professional identities, sense of self, and self worth. We would like to examine the power structures, values, and contexts that influence our personal, professional, and institutional conceptions of service in libraries, as well as the costs and consequences (to ourselves and our institutions) of these very personal identity negotiations.

Possible Topics

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

Section 1: Situating Service in Librarianship
This introductory section will include a history of service values and behaviors in librarianship. It will examine the ways in which this value has been internalized by practitioners without a clear, agreed upon definition across the different subfields of librarianship.

Section 2: Intersecting Identities & Service
This section will include contributed chapters on the intersections of the ethos of service and personal identity. Questions explored may include:

• How do librarians’ personal identities influence their conception of service in libraries?
• What does service in libraries mean to you?
• In what ways do gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and/or ability influence service expectations of librarians; the ways in which service is performed/carried out; and the ways in which service is perceived by others?
• How do definitions and expectations of service shape professional identities of librarians?
• What are the consequences of not meeting service expectations? How do these consequences differ based on personal identities?
• What is the role of power in service roles and how is influenced by intersectional identity?

Section 3: Reworking the Concept of Service in Libraries
This section will attempt to redefine the concept of service in libraries through a variety of critical theoretical lenses. Contributed chapters may, for example, rework service through a feminist, critical race, or critical disability framework. We also welcome theories and perspectives from other fields. Questions explored may include:

• Do we need a new shared definition of service in libraries?
• Should we abandon the ethos of service in libraries altogether?
• If so, what other professional values should take precedence?
• How can service be redefined to promote a critical, just, and inclusive work and patron environment in libraries? Can it do this?

A variety of traditional and nontraditional scholarship methods are welcome, including but not limited to rhetorical analysis, critical analysis, lyric scholarship, autoethnography, ethnography, phenomenological research, interviews, and other methods of exploring personal and collective identity and the ethos of service.

Timeline
• CFP distributed: April 2, 2018
• Deadline for Chapter Proposals: July 15, 2018
• Notification of Accepted Chapter Proposals: October 1, 2018
• First drafts due: January 15, 2019
• Second drafts due: March 15, 2019
• Final drafts due: June 1, 2019
• Editing: June-August 2019
• Submission of final manuscript: September 1, 2019

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to serviceinlibrariesbook@gmail.com

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter examines the ethos of service in libraries in relation to identity, and/or a larger theoretical framework. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss service in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby, editors, at varellano@gmail.com or jogadsby@gmail.com.

BMore! SLA Poster Sessions

Call for Posters:

The Social Sciences & Humanities and Academic Divisions of the Special Libraries Association invite proposals for a poster session to be held during SLA’s annual conference in Baltimore, June 9-13, 2018.

 

The theme for the SLA 2018 conference is BMore! We welcome proposals addressing any aspect of this theme. How are you and your library being more innovative? More collaborative? More inclusive? Posters may present original research, case studies, or work in progress.

 

A prize will be awarded for the best poster, as judged by attendees.

 

Proposals should be submitted by April 16, 2018 using this form [http://bit.ly/BMORESLA]. Please include a title and description of about 250 words. Proposals will be reviewed by the 2018 poster session committee for relevance to the theme and quality, and applicants will be notified of acceptance decisions by April 30, 2018.

 

The poster session will be a relaxed and informal time to share ideas with your colleagues and will be held on Tuesday, June 12, from 9-10 a.m. Poster presenters are expected to stay for the hour to answer questions and to network with attendees.

 

The 2018 poster session committee is Marilyn Bromley, Lateka Grays, and Tara Murray. Please send any questions to Tara at tem10@psu.edu.

Catholic Library World

Submissions are being accepted on an ongoing basis for upcoming issues of Catholic Library World. 

Catholic Library World is the official journal of the Catholic Library Association. Established in 1929, CLW is a peer reviewed association journal. CLW publishes articles focusing on all aspects of librarianship, especially as it relates to Catholic Studies and CatholicismCLW articles are intended for an audience that is interested in the broad role and impact of various types of libraries, including, but not limited to academic, public, theological, parish and church libraries, and school libraries. 

The preferred method for submitting manuscripts is as a word-processed attachment in e-mail. Author’s full name, affiliation, and e-mail address must accompany any manuscript submission. 

Articles should provide something new to the existing literature. The word count should be 3500- 5000 words and should adhere to The Chicago Manual of Style (humanities is preferred). The style should be accessible and well-documented. 

For more information, please visit this website: https://cathla.org/Main/About/Publications 

Send submissions and queries to: Sigrid Kelsey, General Editor, sigridkelsey@gmail.com 

Library Trends : Disabled Adults in Libraries

Issue title: Disabled Adults in Libraries (title is intentional)
Submission deadline: January 1, 2018
Co-editors: Jessica Schomberg and Shanna Hollich
Submit to: librarydisabilities@gmail.com
Publication date: May 2019

https://www.press.jhu.edu/journals/library-trends/calls-papers

Nature and scope of this issue:

Though scholarship about disabilities has been robust in various social science and humanities disciplines for decades, libraries have been slow to theorize or systematically examine the experiences of dis/ability in libraries. This special issue will be geared toward the experience of being a Disabled adult in libraries, as user or worker. Through a mixture of empirical research, case studies, interviews, and theoretical papers, this issue will capture perspectives of Disabled members of our broad library community.

There are many possible approaches one can take to examine disabilities and disability theory. The approach guiding this issue is taken from an in-press work by one of the editors.

There is no universally accepted definition of disabilities or single approach to disability theory. Legalistic definitions, including those presented in the Americans with Disabilities Act and the United Nations Conventions on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities tend to be exclusionary and restrictive in their ideations about humanity. By this, I mean that in their construction of disability and disabled people, they work from a deficit model in which disabled humans are treated as corporeal abnormalities. However, if one out of every seven human beings could be considered disabled, as research demonstrates, disability is a common part of human existence. For many of us, when we talk about in/accessibility in libraries, we’re not just talking about things that others experience; we’re talking about ourselves.

Critical disability studies (CDS) is one approach that offers a way of including disabled people in academic discourse. In this approach, disabled people are participants and researchers who can engage in self-reflexive critiques, not just objects of study. While some theoretical models focus on binary categories that are presented in contrast to each other, such as contrasting social and medical models or disability and impairment, CDS scholars focus on the entire lived experiences of disabled people. This allows for more complicated modes of analysis, such as acknowledging that disabilities may include both social and medical aspects.

We are intentionally seeking out reviewers and authors who have diverse experiences and backgrounds, including library workers of color, library workers who have LGBTQIA+ identities, and those who have Disabled identities. Because we anticipate that several authors will have experience both as Disabled library workers and as Disabled library users, we want to allow either or both perspectives to be incorporated into their research. However, to provide some limits on the scope of this issue, we are focusing on the library experiences of Disabled adults.

Timeline
January 1, 2018 Article proposals are due
February 1, 2018 Editors will notify people if proposals are accepted
June 1, 2018 Article drafts are due
August 1, 2018 Reviewer feedback will be sent
September/October 2018 Final edits
November 1, 2018 Final manuscripts are due to the publisher

The writing style follows Chicago rules. Complete articles are expected to be in the 4,000-10,000 word range. More information about the style rules can be found here: Author Instructions for the Preparation of Articles

Proposal requirements:

A complete proposal will include the following:

  • abstract of proposed article (200-300 words is preferred)
  • a short author biography — it doesn’t have to be formal at this point; we welcome casual explanations of how your background and experience influences your desire to write in this area

Submit to librarydisabilities@gmail.com

If you need help with your abstract or framing your article, the Article Framework Questions used by In the Library with the Lead Pipe are very helpful: http://www.inthelibrarywiththeleadpipe.org/submission-guidelines/.

If you plan to include statistical analysis, please let us know how you will ensure that your methodology and analysis are solid.

Please contact us if you have any questions!

Jessica Schomberg, co-editor
Shanna Hollich, co-editor
librarydisabilities@gmail.com

Politics of Libraries Conference

April 23, 2017
University of Alberta – School of Library and Information Studies
https://politicsoflibraries.github.io/

The spring of 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the turbulent spring of 1968 where social and political movements resulted in protests and strikes across many Western democracies. In France in May of 1968, where unrest was most pointed, some declared the month to be the “début d’une lutte prolongée” or “beginning of a prolonged struggle.” While the protests and strikes seemed to indicate a progressive momentum in the waning period of the so-called ‘golden era’ of the Fordist social contract, the response to the social protests of 1968 (and political radicalism that followed) was the emergence of economic and political neoliberalism. Looking back on 50 years since 1968, we aim to question not what failed in the spring of 1968 nor how a new political and economic order arose, but what is the state of the politics of libraries in 2018? What struggles continue and what new ones must be undertaken?

Reflecting on this 50th anniversary, an interested group of librarians, information professionals, students, and academics is hosting a conference questioning the politics of libraries in 2018, discussed over one day in April 2018 at the University of Alberta. In the spirit of 1968, we invite practitioners, scholars, activists, students, and other members of the general public interested in library allied information services to submit proposals on the issue of the politics of libraries in 2018. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Neutrality in libraries
  • Hegemonic and counter-hegemonic roles of libraries
  • Resistance in library services and work
  • Neoliberalism and its relationship to libraries
  • Precarity in library work

Please submit proposals (not to exceed 400 words) for individual (20 minute presentations) and group/panel contributions using this form by midnight January 30, 2018.

All submissions will undergo a double-blind peer review process undertaken by the conference organizers. Notification on the status of submissions will be made by mid-February, 2018.