Category Archives: Men’s Studies

Journal of Play in Adulthood”

The new “Journal of Play in Adulthood” now has an open call for papers!
This new diamond open access journal (free to read and publish in) would welcome papers from information literacy practitioners and researchers. Research based articles are subject to double blind peer review, but we also welcome articles from practice, extended essays, and reviews that might be of interest to our readers.
Key topics of interest to the journal include the role of play in learning, work, our social and cultural lives, the benefits to individuals and society, and the interrelationship between play and other areas of adult life. The focus of this journal is on play in adulthood to explicitly distinguish it from children’s play, and to highlight that the motivations, contexts, and forms of play are, in many cases, different. In summary, it covers playful living, playful working, and playful learning.

Contact:

Andrew Walsh MSc MCLIP FHEA FRSA IFNTF

University Teaching Fellow, National Teaching Fellow

Academic Librarian for Education and Professional Development.

Editor of the Journal of Play in Adulthood

https://www.journalofplayinadulthood.org.uk

I

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

Conference Announcement & Call for Proposals:

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

MILEX 2019 Spring Conference

Thursday, April 25, 2019, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Loyola Graduate Center, 8890 McGaw Rd, Columbia, MD

(Registration forthcoming)

The Maryland Information Literacy Exchange (MILEX) is a collaborative of Maryland academic librarians to promote information literacy in higher education.

Join us at this year’s MILEX Spring Conference featuring presentations on the role of libraries in culturally responsive teaching.  A keynote will be given by Ashleigh D. Coren, Special Collections Librarian for Teaching and Learning at University of Maryland Libraries, whose teaching focuses on diverse students and finding stories in the collection. Coren is co-developer of the LGBTQ Oral History Project at UMD, and was recognized as an Emerging Leader by ALA in 2018.

Registration fees (light breakfast and hot lunch included):

MILEX member                      $45

Non-member                           $75

Membership + Registration     $65

Student                                    $20

For more information, visit the MILEX website: www.milexmd.org.

Call for Proposals! (Due March 4th)

We’re looking for presentations that demonstrate how librarians are engaging in culturally responsive teaching. Submit proposals to the chair of the conference committee, Jordan Sly, at jsly@umd.edu by Monday, March 4, 2019.

Include the following in your proposal:

1.       In a paragraph or two, what your presentation will entail; a general outline is fine.

2.       Student learning outcomes (what will students learn/develop as a result of the activity)

3.       Optimal amount of time that should be allotted for your presentation

4.       Any resources you will need

5.       Short biographical statement

Registration will open on March 12 at the MILEX website:www.milexmd.org/events.html.

Register early, as space will be limited.

Please don’t hesitate to contact Jordan Sly with your questions and concerns: 301-405-9290.

Funds raised will be administered by the University System of Maryland Foundation, Inc. for the benefit of MILEX – Maryland Information Literacy Exchange.

EDUCATION, SOCIETY, & REFORM CONFERENCE

28-29 JUNE 2019, ANKARA

For more information go to: http://www.edusref.org/

Education, Society & Reform Research (EDUSREF-2019) is an International Conference that aims to bridge the knowledge gap, promote social research esteem, and produce democratic information for potential education reforms.

Main Theme of the Conference is

“Questioning of Changes in Education: Looking for Priorities in Education”

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15 April 2019

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 22 May 2019

 

Conference Dates: 28 and 29 June 2019

 

Full Paper Submission Deadline: 15 September 2019

 

(After the conference, the interested presenters may submit their fulltext to Education Reform Journal on www.erjournal.org for possible evaluation.

 

Also the presenters who want to publish their papers in the e-book may send it edusref@outlook.com)

 

Conference Topics

Paper topics may include, but are not limited, to the following:

 

  • Educational Policies and Practices
  • Trends and Challenges Shaping Education
  • Large-Scale Assessments in Education (PISA, TALIS, PIACC etc.)
  • Economic Challenges (i.e. BREXIT) and its Reflections on Education Systems
  • International Benchmarking /Indicators
  • Comparative Studies in education
  • Social Transitions & School Culture and Climate
  • Socio-Psychological Analyses for Education
  • Social Media and its Reflections on Schools
  • Migration and Education Studies
  • Gender and Education Studies
  • Inclusive Education
  • School Improvement
  • Creativity and Innovation in Education
  • Innovative Learning Environments
  • Curriculum Critiques
  • School Leadership
  • Performance Appraisal in Education
  • Law of Education
  • Professional Development
  • Teacher Education
  • Developing Higher Education Systems

 

In order to make the productions of the conference efficient, the authors are expected to answer this question “What are the implications based on the results of study for potential education reforms? “ in the conclusion remarks in their study.

 

Conference Secretary

 

e-mail: edusref@outlook.com

 

 

Pitfalls of neutrality: What does inclusivity mean in libraries?

The ACRL Women and Gender Studies Section (WGSS) is looking for panelists for our accepted program at ALA Annual 2019 in Washington, D.C. The program is called “Pitfalls of neutrality: What does inclusivity mean in libraries?” It is scheduled for Saturday, June 19, at 9:00 am. Each panelist will have approximately 10-15 minutes to speak. To be considered as a panelist, please submit a brief summary of the issue(s) you would address, including your type of library to Laura Bonella (laurab@ksu.edu) by Monday, January 21.

Program description: Librarians are committed to promoting equity, diversity, and inclusion, but what does this mean in today’s political climate? We are frequently required to make decisions that pit free speech against the comfort and safety of other patrons (e.g. allowing political or hate groups to use our meeting rooms), or called upon to defend our collection, exhibit, or program decisions in the face of patron challenges. Even our decisions about configuring the space in our libraries may create controversy – gender neutral restrooms, prayer rooms, lactation rooms, or how we make our buildings accessible.

We are looking for a diverse group of speakers who have handled these challenges and can share their experiences and how they dealt with various situations. Attendees will have the chance to ask questions and interact with the speakers and each other. We would like them to leave the program with strategies from different libraries to consider when examining their own perspectives on equity, diversity, and inclusion and how to address these issues in their libraries. The program is co-sponsored by the ALA Office of Intellectual Freedom and will have a panelist from their office.

 

All the best,

Laura Bonella

2019 WGSS Program Planning chair

International Intersectionality Conference

Link to pdf: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdornsife.usc.edu%2Fassets%2Fsites%2F80%2Fdocs%2FCFR_International_Intersectionality_Conference_CFP_-_FINAL.pdf&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C0d1fe79ddcab44dba36d08d665e3e14c%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636808426748363078&sdata=5mtTTSJelpttrWskRww0BCJfmz4qezwi9LJzq1zRcyM%3D&reserved=0

Call for Papers:
International Intersectionality Conference University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, USA March 6-8, 2019
The Center for Feminist Research at the University of Southern California (USC) invites submissions of paper proposals for our 2019 Internationality Intersectionality Conference to be held on March 6-8, 2019 on the campus of USC in Los Angeles, CA. Papers presented will be considered for inclusion in a forthcoming Handbook of Intersectionality co-edited by Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro and Nira Yuval-Davis.
This year’s conference theme, “Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production,” will focus on approaches to intersectional research over time, emphasizing the role of intersectional research in shaping the scope of cutting-edge work across disciplines including but not limited to political science, public health, sociology, psychology, feminist media studies, ethnic studies, literature, social movements, law and public policy.
Proposal Guidelines:
Individual paper proposals should include a 500-word abstract, including a paper title. Please submit proposals in Word format along with contact information including name, address, and institutional affiliation to InterIntersectionality.2019@gmail.com by 11:59 PM Pacific Standard Time on January 7, 2019 to be considered. Questions can be sent to Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Director of the USC Center for Feminist Research and Conference Convener: ahancock@usc.edu
As we plan our conference in Southern California, a geographic area with a rich cultural history long before European contact, we are mindful of the multi-various ways that power is structured through space and place and how those structures interact with race, gender, gender-identity, nationality, class, [dis]ability, and sexuality.
“Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production” will explore the history of intersectional research, challenges that drive the field today, and ways to build up intersectional and cross-generational networks for the future. While the notion of echoes conjures up important thinking about haunting and the past, our theme includes and welcomes engagements with non-Western, nonlinear, and non-capitalist temporalities.
We seek papers that explore and/or expand the boundaries of intersectionality as a growing field of study. Comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinary, and cross-generational work that are either interpretive, quantitative, qualitative, or use multiple methods are welcome. Below are some topics that potential contributors might consider:
*Mapping the presence/absence of categories of difference like class or culture *Race, gender, and sexuality in the digital era
*Migration and belonging during times of war or political conflict *Scholar-activism as a practice of radicalizing feminist futures
*Language, cultural meanings, and practices of identity in politics
*Health inequality and future intersectional frameworks of care for self and others *Critical race theory and interconnections with class, gender, and sexuality *Womxn of color and public policy
*Quantitative patterns of intersectional inequality

Consumer Identities and Social Change Symposium

Submission deadline: January 10, 2019

In partnership with The Institute for International Communication at St. John’s University, Consumer Identities is now accepting submissions for paper presentations at an upcoming one-day symposium, Consumer Identities and Social Change.

We seek transdisciplinary interpretations and critical analyses of consumer identity, broadly defined, across various cultural and media landscapes that address some aspect of social change. This symposium follows the 2017 installment, Consumer Identities and Digital Culture.

Potential topics (including but not limited to):

  • Activism and consumption
  • Anti-consumerism
  • Consumer identity and global issues
  • Corporate social responsibility and popular culture
  • Cultural marketing and consumer relationships
  • Environmental responsibility, greenwashing and branding
  • Grassroots media
  • Historical changes in consumer culture
  • The political economy of consumption

    We welcome scholarly submissions that address audience, industry, and critical/cultural perspectives and are particularly interested in the intersections thereof.

    Website: https://consumeridentities.com/

    Location: St. John’s University, New York City, Queens Campus

    Date: March 22, 2019

    Keynote: Dr. Emily West, Associate Professor, Department of Communication at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Submissions:

    350-word abstract and brief biographical note by 01/10/2019 to consumer.identities@gmail.com.

    Accepted panelists will be notified in mid-January.

    Please address any questions to:

    Candice D. Roberts
    Assistant Professor, Communication
    St. John’s University
    robertsc@stjohns.edu

    or

    Myles Ethan Lascity
    Assistant Professor, Fashion Media
    Southern Methodist University
    mlascity@smu.edu

Diversity, Equity, and Justice Talks: In and Beyond the Library

Members of LITA’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee are seeking to fill its ALA panel slot “Diversity, Equity, and Justice Talks: In and Beyond the Library” with presentations from three panelists interested in approaching the topic of Diversity, Equity, and Justice from their own personal and/or institutional perspective. As libraries, archives, and cultural heritage institutions attempt to embed diversity and equity into the core of their institutional practices, it can be helpful to provide ample platforms for discovering, engaging with, and highlighting powerful narratives that reflect the work we must do in order to continue pushing against institutional oppression–or to highlight where we are not pushing hard
enough.

They invite potential panelists to submit brief proposals around any topic that relates to diversity and equity work at large: employing anti-racist praxis in libraries/your library work, navigating microagressions, allyship, cultural competency–to name a few. However, any and all topics are welcome, and do not need to speak directly speak to technology in any way.

The deadline to submit is December 9.

You can find the online form here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf8GoZ4GBvd_–xCOBQ907Y4JCH0fGJKz8KzrDI57SAd55inw/viewform

If you have any questions, please reach out to the committee Chair, Jennifer Brown (jebrown@barnard.edu) or Vice Chair, Jharina Pascual (jharinapascual@hotmail.com).

How Old is Too Old? Narratives about Becoming a Parent after 40

Dottir Press
How Old is Too Old?
Narratives about Becoming a Parent after 40
Co-editors: Vicki Breitbart and Nan Bauer-Maglin

We are seeking personal narratives that explore the realities of becoming and being a parent after the age of 40. There are many reasons why people are getting pregnant later or adopting children when they are over 40. With new definitions of marriage and family and an increase in reproductive technologies becoming a parent is a possibility for many more individuals over 40. While this group of parents is a growing phenomenon, the stigma against becoming a parent over 40, still exists.

We are looking for a range of proposals with topics that challenge the notions about who should become a parent and at what time in our lives. This book will be a collection of narratives written by those who have lived the experience. Their stories will highlight how the issue of age affects our opportunities to parent; some will add the discrimination felt due to race, class and sexual orientation to an already difficult situation. The stories will challenge gender roles, will confront the U.S. culture’s concepts about aging and the inequities about health care and opportunities for successful parenting.

All the narratives will be based on the life experiences of people who have faced some aspect of becoming an older parent, raising a child as an older parent, being in a relationship with a partner beginning parenting over 40, being raised by an older parent, or providing health care or services to people who want to be parents later in life.

We are interested in a variety of genres and approaches (dialogues, interviews, memoir, poetry, for example) and tones (serious to comic). They should be written in an accessible voice. We are committed to using gender-inclusive language in this collection by using words such as pregnant “person” or “older parent” when appropriate.

Please send us both a one-to-two-page description of what you are interested in writing by January 15. Include a few sentences about your previous writings and/or work. Please forward this call to friends and colleagues.

Vicki Breitbart vbreitbart@gmail.com   Nan Bauer-Maglin nan.bauermaglin99@ret.gc.cuny.edu

Feminist Collaborations: Intersectional and Transnational Teaching & Learning

Co-editors Isis Nusair and Barbara Shaw are soliciting abstracts for
inclusion in an anthology that focuses on feminist collaborations and the
radical interconnectedness between pedagogy, theory and practice. We seek
cutting edge work that scholars-teachers-activists are engaging with that
goes beyond valuing collaboration abstractly to engaging it and linking
theory to practice in building feminist/women’s/gender/ LGBTQ+ communities.
This project emerges out of three women’s, gender & sexuality curriculum
institutes funded through the Great Lakes College Association (GLCA) and in
which contributors drew on and returned to the work of Richa Nagar,
AnaLouise Keating, Chandra Mohanty, Jacquie Alexander, Ann Russo, and
others to think through feminist-queer collaborations and pedagogies. Our
call for abstracts invites scholars-educators-activists broadly to focus on
the connection between theory and practice in the process of teaching and
learning, and how to develop strategies for doing collaborative work in an
expansive field of study within and across institutional boundaries. The
aim of the anthology is to fill a vacuum in pedagogy especially on how to
teach intersectionality and transnationalism. It will focus on theorizing
pedagogical approaches and providing resources (media and visuals, syllabi
and assignments) for teaching introductory, theory & method, capstone and
special topics courses in an expanding field. This will help in faculty
development and building local, regional, and transnational connections
that imagine its purpose beyond institutionalization and actively
contributes to socio-political change.

Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Barbara Shaw ( bshaw@allegheny.edu )
and Isis Nusair ( nusairi@denison.edu ) by December 20, 2018. Further
inquiries are welcome. Publishers have expressed interest in the volume and
we will be crafting the book proposal based on selected abstracts.

Reviewers for Resources for Gender and Women’s Studies: A Feminist Review

The University of Wisconsin Office of the Gender and Women’s Studies Librarian<https://www.library.wisc.edu/gwslibrarian/> is looking for scholars, faculty, and graduate students to write reviews of approximately 500-800 words for publication in Resources for Gender and Women’s Studies: A Feminist Review.

The fine print:

– We select reviewers and provide writing guidelines. If you haven’t published with us before, we’ll ask you to provide a book or film review as a sample of your writing. This sample does not need to have been published, and the book or film need not be new.

– Selected reviewers must give us copyright (but can use their own contribution in other places after publication in RGWS).

– We cannot offer compensation, but we provide the book which the reviewer gets to keep. The reviewer also gets two print copies of the RGWS issue in which their review is published.

– All reviews are edited before publication; reviewers have the opportunity to approve editing and make final changes.

– Potential reviewers should familiarize themselves with the kinds of reviews we’ve published; see past issues at www.library.wisc.edu/gwslibrarian/publications/gwsresources/newest-items/<http://www.library.wisc.edu/gwslibrarian/publications/gwsresources/newest-items/>.

If interested, please contact JoAnne Lehman, Senior Editor, joanne.lehman@wisc.edu<mailto:joanne.lehman@wisc.edu>, to discuss and for a list of books currently available for review.