Category Archives: Men’s Studies

YTH Live 2018

YTH Live is the conference that ignites innovation in youth, technology, and health. Plus, this year will mark the 10 year anniversary of the conference making it the biggest yet.

YTH Live takes place May 6-7, 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The conference includes sessions on video games, non profit outreach, mobile apps, texting, and social media all being used to address issues like mental health, reproductive rights, peer education, drug use, HIV and AIDS, STDs, and more. Information can be found at http://yth.org/ythlive/about/

At YTH Live 2018, attendees will meet youth leaders, app developers, hackers, designers, health workers, policymakers, as well as educators, researchers, and other advocates who are using technology to make a difference in the health and wellness of youth.

Learn more at yth.org/live and register at yth.org/register. Click here for additional assets and if you need drafted social media posts or any other materials let us know and we would be happy to provide those for you.

Our call for abstracts is now open, where those who want to share an innovative project, campaign, program, or research in youth health, technology, and health tech are invited to submit a proposal, to be considered to speak at our conference. The deadline for this is Friday, October 27, 2017. We’d love to invite you to submit and to share this opportunity with your networks!

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

VIEW Journal Call for Papers on “Audiovisual Data in Digital Humanities”

Considering the relevance of audiovisual material as perhaps the biggest wave of data to come in the near future (Smith, 2013, IBM prospective study) its relatively modest position within the realm of Digital Humanities conferences is remarkable. The objective of this special issue for VIEW is to present current research in that field on a variety of epistemological, historiographical and technological issues that are specific for digital methods applied to audiovisual data. We strive to cover a great range of media and data types and of applications representing the various stages of the research process.

The following key topics / problems / questions are of special interest:

  1. Do computational approaches to sound and (moving) images extend or/and change our conceptual and epistemological understanding of these media? What are the leading machine learning approaches to the study of audio and visual culture and particularly time-based media? How do these approaches, models, and methods of learning relate to acquiring and producing knowledge by the conventional means of reading and analyzing text? Do we understand the 20th century differently through listening to sounds and voices and viewing images than through reading texts? How does massive digitization and online access relate to the concept of authenticity and provenance?
  2. What tools in the sequence of the research process – search, annotation, vocabulary, analysis, presentation – are best suited to work with audio-visual data? The ways in which we structure and process information are primarily determined by the convention of attributing meaning to visual content through text. Does searching audio-visual archives, annotating photos or film clips, analyzing a corpus of city sounds, or presenting research output through a virtual exhibition, require special dedicated tools? What is the diversity in requirements within the communities of humanities scholars? How can, for example, existing commercial tools or software be repurposed for scholarly use?
  3. What are the main hurdles for the further expansion of AV in DH? Compared to text, audiovisual data as carriers of knowledge are a relatively young phenomenon. Consequently the question of ‘ownership’ and the commercial value of many audiovisual sources result in considerable constraints for use due to issues of copyright. A constraint of a completely different order, is the intensive investment in time needed when listening to or watching an audiovisual corpus, compared to reading a text. Does the law or do technologies for speech and image retrieval offer solutions to overcome these obstacles?

Practicals
Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, digital humanities, television and media history.
Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on October 2nd , 2017.
Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 1st week of November 2017.
Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on 15 th of February 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.
For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mark Williams (Associate Professor Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College U.S.), Pelle Snickars (Prof. of Media Studies Umea Univesity, Sweden) or Andreas Fickers (Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History).

About VIEW Journal
See http://www.viewjournal.eu/ for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

Educational Forum Themed issue on Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Call for Manuscripts for Themed Issue

The Educational Forum

Volume 82, No. 3

Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Editors: Alan Amtzis, Tabitha Dell’Angelo, and Ryan Flessner

Due date: November 1, 2017

What is the impact of political polarization on curricula, pedagogy, funding, and other imposed policies across the educational landscape? How are P-16+ educators and school leaders responding to politically motivated intellectual and policy challenges at the school level? In what ways are teacher educators revising their materials and methods in response to political strife? How are educators negotiating political conflicts with government and community stakeholders at all levels?

For example, some educators in the UK hope to revive political education at the school level as a means to create a more civically literate society. Similarly, in the US, where the federal administration has taken controversial stances on climate change, civil rights, and immigration, many teachers are adjusting curricula and pedagogy to emphasize and retain access to social and scientific knowledge important to a just and inclusive democracy. In many countries and cultures around the globe, educational processes are being mediated by state-sponsored mandates. This themed issue seeks to explore and highlight the educational advocacy and activist work being done in the name of global literacy, social justice, and resistance in a political climate where new filters on knowledge may seek to dismantle public education and affiliated social institutions by limiting critical perspectives in students’ educational experience.

Research articles, essays, and policy briefs might address questions or ideas such as:

  • the ways schools and communities are implementing strategies that recognize and respond to conditions that contribute to (or address) education inequity
  • the methods educators are taking to actualize and maintain strong social justice stances in and out of the classroom
  • the approaches educators, students, and communities are taking to organize as participants in the growing movement to resist political agendas
  • the individual or local pedagogic practices and wide-scale reforms being implemented to ensure student access to all knowledge

These questions suggest topic areas but are not exhaustive. We encourage submissions not only from scholars and researchers but also from students, teachers, and community members.

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words, including all references.

We seek previously unpublished thematic essays or empirical research. For full instructions, please visit: http://www.kdp.org/publications/theeducationalforum/authorguidelines.php

Submission deadline: November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/utef

Please include the code “823” at the beginning of your manuscript title.

For more information, please contact the issue co-editors:

Dr. Alan Amtzis (amtzis@tcnj.edu),

Dr. Tabitha Dell’Angelo (dellange@tcnj.edu), or Dr. Ryan Flessner (rflessne@butler.edu).

 

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Michigan.
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
July 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, YOUR LAST NAME on subject
line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJBIDE:

The International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) investigates critically the positioning of diverse individuals in formal and informal contexts of education – from kindergarten to adult education, but also lifelong learning. Diversities here refer to different identity markers such as ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, citizenship, disabilities, educational background and language(s). IJBIDE is clearly positioned within a non-essentialist and non-culturalist perspective. IJBIDE also aims to promote original research methods by linking up macro- and micro- methodological approaches. The journal is fully blind peer reviewed by the best experts in the field and publishes empirical and conceptual research and case studies from around the world.

Indices of IJBIDE:

  • Cabell’s Directories
  • Google Scholar
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJBIDE:

The topics covered in the contributions include (but are not limited to):

  • The perception, place and role of diversities in (teacher) education (students, teachers, student-teachers, leadership, etc.)
  • Bullying, bias, segregation and discrimination in education
  • Academic and student mobility and diversities
  • Diversities and informal learning
  • School choices and diversities
  • Teaching about diversities (intercultural/global competence)
  • Forms of discrimination and segregation in education
  • Place/space and diversities
  • Diversities and digital educational technologies
  • Links between ‘home’ and school in relation to diversities (parents)
  • Media representations of diversities in education
  • Assessment, evaluation and diversities
  • Role and place of diversities in education policies
  • Diversities within a school system
  • Teaching material and diversities
  • History of diversities in education
  • Interactions between and integration of students of diverse backgrounds
  • Role and place of teachers of diverse backgrounds
  • Perception and integration of the ‘foreigner’ in education
  • Diversities and multilingual education
  • Methods or methodologies/conceptual approaches and researching diversities
  • Reflexivity and/or critical awareness around diversities in education
  • Social Action and Diversities
  • The commodification or processes of commodifying of diversities in education
  • Inclusive education and diversities
  • The impact of globalization on diversities
  • Social processes and diversification/differentiation
  • Multimodality and diversities

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-bias-identity-diversities/125026

Where There is Thunder, There is Lightning: EDI and Change in Libraries

Program Date and Time: Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m.

The ALA Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Implementation Working Group is looking for lightning talks on equity, diversity, and inclusion initiatives from a broad range of libraries.

The presentation will be on Sunday, June 25th from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the 2017 ALA Annual Conference in Chicago, IL and will include the option for video presentations if you can’t attend in person.

Presenters will have 5 minutes to share their successes and failures with initiatives designed to promote equity, diversity, and inclusion in your libraries, which means we have time for up to 12 presentations.

To apply for participation, please submit the following:

Title

Brief description for your presentation

Will you be presenting in person or submitting a video

Email to diversity@ala.org , Use the subject line: Lightning Talk Application

Applications are due by May 15th and participants will be announced by May 31st.

If you have any questions about the event or the process, please contact Martin Garnar at mgarnar@uccs.edu.

CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH GRANTS 

DEADLINE: All proposals must be received no later than April 1, 2017.

The Dirksen Congressional Center invites applications for grants to fund research on congressional leadership and the U.S. Congress.  The Center, named for the late Senate Minority Leader Everett M. Dirksen, is a private, nonpartisan, nonprofit research and educational organization devoted to the study of Congress.  Since 1978, the Congressional Research Grants program has invested more than $1,000,000 to support over 462 projects. Applications are accepted at any time, but the deadline is April 1 for the annual selections, which are announced in May.

The Center has allocated up to $30,000 in 2017 for grants with individual awards capped at $3,500

The competition is open to individuals with a serious interest in studying Congress. Political scientists, historians, biographers, scholars of public administration or American studies, and journalists are among those eligible. The Center encourages graduate students who have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus to apply and awards a significant portion of the funds for dissertation research. Applicants must be U.S. citizens who reside in the United States.

The grants program does not fund undergraduate or pre-Ph.D. study. Organizations are not eligible. Research teams of two or more individuals are eligible. No institutional overhead or indirect costs may be claimed against a Congressional Research Grant.

Download the Word document — Congressional Research Grant Application — and complete the required entries. You may send the application as a Word or pdf attachment to an e-mail directed to Frank Mackaman at fmackaman@dirksencenter.org. Please insert the following in the Subject Line:  “CRG Application [insert your surname].” Thank you.

The Congressional Research Grant Application contains the following elements: Applicant Information, Congressional Research Grant Project Description, Budget, Curriculum Vita, Reference Letter (reference Letter not to exceed one page—additional pages will not be forwarded to the judges), and Overhead Waiver Letter.

The entire application when printed must NOT exceed ten pages. Applications may be single-spaced. Please use fonts no smaller than 10-point. This total does NOT include the reference letter (one additional page) or the Overhead Waiver Letter (one additional page).

All application materials must be received on or before April 1 of the current year. Grants will be announced in May.

Complete information about what kinds of research projects are eligible for consideration, what could a Congressional Research Grant pay for, application procedures, and how recipients are selected may be found at The Center’s Website:http://dirksencenter.org/print_programs_crgs.htm. PLEASE READ THOROUGHLY. Frank Mackaman is the program officer – fmackaman@dirksencenter.org.

Cindy Koeppel

The Dirksen Congressional Center

2815 Broadway Rd.

Pekin, IL 61554

P: 309.347.7113

E: ckoeppel@dirksencenter.org

The Journal of Homosexuality Special issue 25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs

Dear Colleagues,

I wanted to share with you the CFP for a special issues of The Journal of Homosexuality for which I am a guest co-editor. The upcoming special issue, “25 Years On: The State and Continuing Development of LGBTQ Studies Programs,” will be published in 2018.

To mark the 25th anniversary of a 1993 issue on Gay and Lesbian Studies as an emergent discipline, my co-editors and I proposed an issue intended to explore the ways in which LGBTQ Studies programs have developed, evolved, adapted, and sustained themselves within the academy — and continue to do so.

Please share the CFP with your colleagues and lists, and consider submitting:

http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/beh/jh_25_years

Molly Merryman, Ph.D.,
Director of the Center
for the Study of Gender and Sexuality
Associate Professor
Department of Sociology
Kent State University

Journal of Working-Class Studies

*JWCS *is an online, open-access, interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal
that brings together the work of scholars, writers, artists and activists
who are committed to the study and representation of working-class life. We
aim to publish writing about the global working class – a diverse group of
people whose commonality is their position in classed societies.

The inaugural issue <https://workingclassstudiesjournal.com/> features an
introduction by editors Sarah Attfield and Liz Giuffre; articles by leaders
in the field of working-class studies such as Sherry Lee Linkon, John
Russo, Jack Metzgar, and Michael Zweig; and work from emerging voices whose
scholarship focuses on the many intersections of class. Also included are
reviews of books by Tim Sheard, Michelle Tokarczyk and George Lakey.

We invite submissions that contribute significant knowledge to our
understanding of who the global working class(es) are and have been, as
well as what it means to ‘study’ class, conceptually and as a
socio-economic reality. We especially encourage work that explores how
class intersects with other vectors of identity and experience, including
race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, ability, and citizenship status.  The
journal reviews books that feature working-class people, communities,
culture, history, politics, and/or experience as a crucial component of
their scholarly or artistic vision. We also invite artists to submit short
comics or excerpts of longer works. For further information about
submissions, please visit our “Instructions for Authors
<https://workingclassstudiesjournal.com/instructions-for-authors/>” page.

Formed in 2003, the Working-Class Studies Association
<https://wcstudiesassociation.wordpress.com/>is an international
organization which promotes the study of working-class people and their
culture. The Working-Class Studies Association is made up of academics,
activists, teachers, writers, poets, journalists, practitioners, students,
artists and a wide range of others interested in developing the field of
working-class studies. The organization holds an annual conference as well
as other events to promote the field (including a variety of awards), and
act as a discussion forum for working-class issues. The organization is
based in North America and has members world-wide.

We hope you will enjoy the new *Journal of Working-Class Studies*!

To contact the founding editors, Sarah Attfield, Liz Giuffre, please email
editorial@workingclassstudiesjournal.com.

The *Journal of Working-Class Studies* is published by the Working-Class
Studies Association c/o The Texas Center for Working-Class Studies, Collin
College, Spring Creek Campus, 2800 E. Spring Creek Parkway, Plano, Texas
75074, USA.