Category Archives: Open Educational Resources (OER)

DPLAfest 2019

We are pleased to announce that the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is seeking proposals for DPLAfest 2019, a gathering that will explore how libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural organizations across the country leverage technology to serve, inform, and empower communities. We invite proposals that showcase projects, ideas, and solutions designed to help the field meet the technological, social, and civic demands of the 21st century and that highlight the critical role of libraries—and the DPLA network—in shaping the future of access to digital knowledge.

In line with the DPLAfest 2019 theme of Future Shapers, Culture Makers, we invite proposals for presentations, roundtable discussions, and lightning talks related to:
  • Assessment and impact
  • Collaboration with non-traditional partners
  • Collections as data
  • Community Voices
    • Inclusive collection development and practice
    • Building and sustaining community-based collections
  • Ebooks, audiobooks and digital storytelling platforms
  • Innovations in e-content delivery services
  • Library Simplified/SimplyE
  • Reuse of content and/or data
  • Self-publishing models and platforms
  • Sharing cultural heritage
  • Sustainability
  • Technology innovation in areas including, but not limited to:
    • Content delivery platforms
    • Aggregation technology
    • Machine learning
    • Virtual reality
    • Blockchain
View the full Call for Proposals and submit by Friday, January 11, 2019.
 
To learn more about DPLAfest, visit dplafest2019.dp.la, email us at info@dp.la, or join our mailing list for all event announcements!

Online Northwest

Online Northwest 2019

Online Only: Thinking about Content, Practices, and Equity

Call for Speakers

Deadline:  December 10th, 2018 at 5pm

Conference date & location:  March 29, 2019 at Portland State University, Portland OR

Theme: Online-Only: Thinking about Content, Practices, and Equity

Online Northwest is a one-day conference focusing on the intersection of libraries, technology, and culture. The conference explores how technology is applied within library settings and its impact on access and services for patrons. Academic, public, school, and special librarians are strongly encouraged to submit proposals.

Online Northwest seeks proposals for 45-minute panels and 7 minute lightning talks, workshops, and presentations on topics related to our conference theme: Online-Only: Thinking about Content, Practices, and Equity, especially with respect to following tracks and topics:

  • Online-only Information Literacy Instruction

  • Technology Trends: Security, Accessibility, Technology Skills

  • Data: Librarianship, Data Management, Project Management

  • Open Access: Social Justice, OER, Open Research

In addition, proposals that address other online-only aspects of librarianship are welcome as well!

Proposals will be accepted until 5pm on December 10, 2018. To submit a proposal, follow this link and create an account: http://pdxscholar.library.pdx.edu/cgi/ir_submit.cgi?context=onlinenorthwest

For more information about Online Northwest, please see our website:  http://onlinenorthwest.org/ . Information about conference registration will be posted shortly.

Digital Initiatives Symposium 2019

Please note changed proposal deadline: Friday, Dec. 14, 2018

Call for Proposals: Digital Initiatives Symposium 2019
The Digital Initiatives Symposium at the University of San Diego is accepting proposals for its full day conference on Tuesday, April 30, 2019. Proposals should fall into one of three formats:

  • Panel discussions: 60 minutes (please allow 10-15 minutes for Q&A)

  • Concurrent sessions: 45 minutes (please allow 10-15 minutes for Q&A)

  • Lightning talks: 10 minutes

We welcome proposals from organizations, including colleges and universities of all sizes, community colleges, public libraries, special libraries, museums, and other cultural memory institutions. This year, we are especially interested in proposals that consider:

  • linked data

  • social justice and open access

  • the future of open access

  • data management and sharing, open data

  • open educational resources

  • digital initiatives in instruction and undergraduate research

  • roles for deans and directors in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • roles for disciplinary faculty in digital and institutional repository initiatives

  • diverse repository platforms and functions

  • digital humanities

  • copyright, licensing, and privacy issues

  • collaboration: interdisciplinary initiatives and collaboration within and between campuses

  • scholarly communication

  • technical applications related to platforms or tools

  • web archiving

  • web annotation

Submit your proposal at digital.sandiego.edu/symposium (Click on “Submit Proposal” on the left sidebar.) All submissions will be evaluated based on the relevance of the topic and potential to advance thinking about digital initiatives, institutional repositories, and scholarly communication. Acceptance is competitive. Registration fees will be waived for accepted presenters.

Proposal deadline: Friday, Dec. 14, 2018

 

Realizing Resistance: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX

Please follow the link to a CFP for Realizing Resistance: An
Interdisciplinary Conference on Star Wars, Episodes VII, VIII & IX
<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdigital-frontiers.org%2Fresistance%2F&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C13a3e0fc3e284b13a13408d612827336%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636716748819570671&amp;sdata=Uke47JHGUpbG9RDQioYx%2B3IxyPE0rNUSqLS7%2BW7FPPU%3D&amp;reserved=0>. Feminist, women’s studies,
critical race theory, and queer theory papers particularly welcome!

Sam Langsdale
UNT Philosophy & Religion

An Interdisciplinary Conference on *Star Wars*, Episodes VII, VIII & IX

May 2–4, 2019, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA

*Call for Papers:*

Although *Star Wars: Episode IV–A New Hope* may have started out on shaky
ground, its cinematic release in 1977 forever changed the landscape of
American pop culture. As Douglas Brode has argued, “*Star Wars*, simply
put, had turned out to be not merely the latest momentary blip on the
entertainment screen but an essential element of how we define ourselves
through the movies and related media” (2012, 7). Far from simply reflecting
a particular film genre, *Star Wars *has become a cultural phenomenon that
has impacted pop culture for over four decades.

Throughout the original trilogy, the prequels, and most recently the
sequels, the films have focused on the struggle between Imperial forces and
rebellious fighters who seek to throw off the yoke of an authoritarian
regime. In the opening crawl of *Episode VII–The Force Awakens*, we are
told that the Resistance, led by General Leia Organa, is fighting against
the First Order so that peace and justice may be restored to the galaxy.
This conference seeks to critically explore what it means to be “with the
Resistance” by focusing on Episodes VII, VIII, and (to the extent possible)
IX, as well as the various ways these films reflect, contribute to, or even
fail to show “how we define ourselves through the movies and related
media.” In other words, this conference aims to bring together scholars
from across disciplines to examine the three most recent *Star Wars* films
as cultural texts, with an explicit focus on themes of resistance and
justice, and on how these films contribute to, reflect, or depart from
broader contemporary cultural practices and social discourses.

[image: leia_poster]We are interested in, for example, the paradox inherent
in certain fan criticisms of *Episode VII–The Last Jedi* as “social justice
propaganda,” in light of the enduring theme of resistance and justice
throughout the film franchise. We seek to analyze what it means for *Star
Wars *slogans to be used on posters at contemporary political rallies, in
what ways, and by whom. We want to ask how Episodes VII, VIII & IX might be
productively used in a classroom to teach students about various concepts
of justice, or about histories of social resistance movements. We want to
pose critical questions about cultural appropriation and Orientalism in the
most recent films and throughout the franchise. We also want to explore
what limitations there may be in attempting to theorize about and practice
resistance to hegemonic power in relation to a film franchise owned by one
of the most powerful and successful corporations in our contemporary
capitalist economy.

Scholars may analyze any one of the three sequels, or some combination of
them. While we are aware that Episode IX will not be released until
December, we have included it here in order to give interested participants
the opportunity to reflect on trailers, the marketing in the lead-up to the
cinematic release, or even to include analysis of the film itself by the
time of the conference. Further, because the most recent films are part of
the larger franchise, we welcome (and would even expect) papers that put
Episodes VII, VIII & IX in dialogue with any other *Star Wars *films.
Finally, in addition to the films themselves, papers may engage with any
media related to the sequels including comics, animated series, SW fiction,
merchandise, advertising, or other types of social media.

And so, we invite all interested participants to join us in thinking about
the themes of resistance to hegemony, justice, and the restoration of peace
in Episodes VII, VIII & IX and how these films reflect, contribute to, or
depart from wider social discourses and cultural phenomena. In analyzing
“the Resistance,” in the films and beyond, paper proposals, in the form of
250-word abstracts, may address—but are not limited to—any of the following
topics:

– Generational differences or continuities
– Sexualities
– Models of friendship
– Human relationships with technology
– The role of the Environment/non-human animals/creatures
– The role of women
– The role of people of color
– The role of children/young people
– Ambiguity around “good guys” and “bad guys” in social conflicts
– Family/found family/lineage/heritage
– Class hierarchies
– Cultural appropriation and Orientalism
– Heroism through necessity
– Digital Scholarship and New Media Studies interventions
– The significance of names/naming
– The use of humor
– Clothing/fashion/color motifs
– Religion/belief/ritual
– Icons/symbols
– Hope
– Languages
– Teaching

As aca-fans it is our hope that this conference is both a celebration of
the films, and the broader culture engendered by the *Star Wars *franchise,
as well as an opportunity to engage in constructively critical analysis. We
welcome scholars from any discipline, employing any methodology, however in
the spirit of the conference theme, we request that all papers avoid
racism, sexism, ableism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, and religious
bigotry. Accepted participants will be invited to present their 20-minute
papers, or to exhibit their work, at a two-and-a-half-day interdisciplinary
conference at the University of North Texas in Denton. To submit a paper
proposal, please *submit this form
<https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fgoo.gl%2Fforms%2FEXVIyx74BaToVNyC3&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C13a3e0fc3e284b13a13408d612827336%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636716748819570671&amp;sdata=3K1WIJFncF%2BJX6p7DP2xVnSaR%2F1x1UEoBWoFnlZh67A%3D&amp;reserved=0>* with
the following information:

– Name, institutional affiliation, email address of corresponding author
and all co-authors (if applicable)
– 250-word abstract
– Short bio

*Dates and Deadlines*

Submission Deadline: November 15, 2018
Notifications: January 5, 2019
Conference Dates: May 2–4, 2019

If you have questions please contact resistance@digital-frontiers.org.

ACRL DVC Fall 2018 Program

When: October 26, 2018 from 10:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Where: Drexel University’s Learning Terrace

Theme:  Librarians as Advocates:  Leading Activism on Your Campus and Beyond

This program seeks to provide insight into the activism and advocacy work being done in libraries in higher education across the Delaware Valley region. In times of inequity, discrimination, and social injustice, libraries have the opportunity to be institutions of resistance, understanding, and hope. We are bringing together librarians who would like to share how they have incorporated democracy, equity, intellectual freedom, and privacy into their projects and collaborations to advocate for their communities.  Successful proposals will demonstrate an analysis of the underlying power structures that motivate their efforts. Whether your advocacy work takes the form of outreach projects, pedagogical techniques, systems or application development, cataloging practice, or collaborative projects, we would like to give you the opportunity to share your work and its impact with colleagues.

Topics should be related to library leadership in social change including:

  • Services for students with marginalized identities, including documentation status
  • Poverty, food insecurity, or homelessness
  • Voter registration and electoral issues
  • Social, mental, and health-related services
  • Access and textbook-related services
  • Library-related legislation
  • Privacy
  • Diversity, inclusion, and equity
  • Workplace fairness and rights issues

The deadline to submit is September 10 with notification by September 15, 2018.

Submission Information

Proposals must include the following information:

  1. Proposal title
  2. Names, affiliations, positions, and email addresses of the presenters
  3. Preferred presentation format
    1. Option A – 10-minute lightning round presentation only
    2. Option B – 10-minute lightning round presentation and roundtable facilitation.
  4. A 250-word summary of the topic you wish to present including the points you intend to make and the way(s) you intend to engage the audience, if applicable

To propose a session please visit: https://goo.gl/forms/ZOls6D1Xker3b1o83

Questions? E-mail Jess Denke at jessicadenke@muhlenberg.edu

ARLIS/NA Midstates

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) invites those engaged in work related to visual arts and information science to submit a proposal for a presentation at the annual Fall meeting on Friday, October 19th, 2018 in Indianapolis.  Submissions are welcomed in the following formats:

  • Presentations – a talk of 20 minutes, given by one or more presenter, with or without the use of visual aids
  • Lightening-round talks – a talk of 3-5 minutes, given by one presenter, with or without the use of visual aids; particularly suited for emerging trends
  • Poster presentations – a visual presentation in poster format about ongoing or completed projects; presenters may provide handouts and/or speak with viewers in an informal setting

Prospective presenters are encouraged to submit proposals on a variety of issues related to art, design, and visual culture, including:

  • book arts
  • cataloging issues
  • collaboration and partnerships across institutions
  • collection development
  • copyright and open access related to visual materials
  • critical librarianship
  • digital humanities
  • diversity and inclusion in the art library
  • information literacy for artists and art historians
  • museum librarianship
  • outreach to users
  • challenges in special collections
  • web archiving

Submission guidelines:

Submit an abstract of 300 words to Sarah Carter at saccarte@indiana.edu.  Specify your preferred presentation format (presentation, lightening round talk, poster presentation).

Submission deadline: Tuesday, September 18thFall meeting information:

Dates: Friday, October 19th, and Saturday, October 20th, 2018

Venue: Herron Art Library and IUPUI University Library

Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Indianapolis, IN

About ARLIS/NA Midstates:

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a dynamic group of library and information professionals dedicated to art, architecture, design and visual resources. The chapter serves the region including Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. Our members are art and architecture librarians, visual resources curators, museum professionals, archivists and special collections librarians, collectors and appreciators, book publishers and dealers, content providers, educators, artists, and students. The chapter meets twice a year, supporting our professional network, sharing information and visiting member institutions. We welcome all interested members of ARLIS/NA and all students enrolled in regional library and information science programs to become members of the Midstates Chapter. Participation in our meetings is open to all.

EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI)

The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) is a community of higher education institutions and organizations committed to advancing learning through IT innovation. The ELI Annual Meeting provides an opportunity for those interested in learning, learning principles and practices, and learning technologies to explore, network, and share. Find more information about the ELI mission and philosophy here.

Transforming Higher Education: Exploring New Learning Horizons

The horizon of teaching and learning today is characterized by ever greater degrees of agency for learners, instructors, instructional designers, and technologists. From active learning classrooms to integrated student advising and from rapidly improving XR technologies to learning analytics, we all have more options for invention, innovation, and new designs in support of our teaching and learning mission. Join your colleagues as we collectively explore this ever-changing landscape of the new possibilities for learning, addressing these and many other questions:

  • What new kinds of leadership are required for this new teaching and learning landscape?
  • What are the best methods and techniques that promote innovation and creative thinking to support student learning?
  • What new educational technologies seem most promising?
  • What role should data and analytics play, and what are the trade-offs between analytics and privacy?
  • How can we best determine the efficacy of our learning innovations and technologies?
  • What learning spaces and environments best promote active learning?

2019 Annual Meeting Tracks

The strategic use of information technology has the ability to transform teaching and learning, helping institutions realize EDUCAUSE’s mission to advance higher education through the use of information technology. The following tracks include the best ways to navigate the learning horizons. Proposals that clearly describe innovative and creative work will receive the highest priority in the selection process.

  1. Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
  2. Analytics: Privacy, Learning Data, Student Advising, and Interventions
  3. Digital and Information Literacy
  4. Faculty Development and Engagement
  5. Innovation in Instructional Design and Course Models
  6. Leadership and Academic Transformation
  7. Learning Efficacy: Impact Evaluation, Learning Research and Science
  8. Learning Environments and Spaces
  9. Learning Horizons: Emerging Technology, Ground-Breaking Practices, and Educational Futures
  10. Open Education
  11. Student Success
  12. Other

Learning Objectives and Participant Engagement Strategies

The ELI proposal reviewers will closely examine and rate each proposed session’s learning objectives, which should clearly describe what participants will know or be able to do as a result of participating in the session. A successful proposal must also include the specific and creative ways in which the presenter(s) will engage with participants through active learning strategies. ELI encourages innovative and participatory session design, the creative use of technology, and active engagement by all participants.

Session Types

All ELI Annual Meeting sessions will be conducted face-to-face in the meeting venue.

Preconference Workshops

Preconference workshops will be held Tuesday, February 19, from 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. (PT), face-to-face, in Anaheim, California. Up to two presenters from each seminar will be provided with a full complimentary registration to the annual meeting. Preconference workshops are intended to provide attendees with significant assistance in addressing their needs and opportunities to navigate the learning horizons. If you have questions, please contact the speaker liaison.

Present and Engage Sessions

Please note that your presentation session proposal will be carefully evaluated and may be accepted for any of the following formats below, depending on the scope of content and engagement strategies proposed. If you have questions, please contact the speaker liaison.

  • Interactive Presentation: Interactive presentations are opportunities to present in detail on a project, idea, or experience while enabling audience participation. These sessions require continuous engagement tactics, interspersed activity tactics, or intensive Q&A tactics. They are scheduled for 45 minutes, and at least 15 minutes of this time should be interactive.
  • Short Presentation Pairs: Presentation pairings include two 15-minute presentations (by different presenters) followed by a 15-minute question/discussion period, for a total of 45 minutes. This is a great way to organize closely related content with two unique perspectives. When you submit your proposal, you can suggest that your solo presentation be paired by the ELI Annual Meeting Program Team or you can coordinate with colleagues to suggest your paired team. Final pairings will be determined by ELI, based on proposal content. These highly visible sessions highlight pioneering practices by giving institutions a spotlighted venue with condensed presentation time. Please note these are not poster sessions.
  • Hands-On Workshop: Workshops are 45-minute sessions where participants experience technology or pedagogical practices firsthand. Note that these are not presentation sessions—they are activity sessions. Session descriptions should clearly indicate how presenters will guide a hands-on, tutorial-like experience using applications and resources. Participants are asked to bring a mobile device (e.g., smartphone, tablet, laptop) to the session in order to fully participate and to experience an emerging, innovative technology or practice. Hands-on workshops, by virtue of their robust interactive learning design, will have priority consideration for the active learning space (designed by Steelcase Education). Presenters are responsible for providing any additional technologies needed to ensure an engaging hands-on experience.

Discuss and Connect Sessions

  • Discussion Circle: This is ELI’s version of an unstructured, topic-driven discussion, somewhat like a conceptual jam session. The Discussion Circle is a way to engage with colleagues seeking common solutions to today’s greatest challenges on the learning horizon. Eschewing any presentation, discussion circle hosts facilitate conversations in small, intimate settings, allowing participants to take a deep dive into a pressing issue the community is tackling and for which the resolution is not obvious. These 45-minute sessions are highly interactive and provide a unique learning and bonding opportunity.
  • Posters: Posters give participants and presenters the opportunity to share and examine problems, issues, and solutions in a more casual, personal environment through informal, interactive, brief presentations focused on effective practices, research findings, or technical solutions. The standard setup for a poster includes a 6′-foot skirted table, wireless internet access, and boards. Posters are allocated 45 minutes of action, with ample time for setup and breakdown.

Please take a moment to view this 5-minute video on how to write an effective proposal. Following the tips in this video will increase the likelihood of your proposal being selected.

Preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

 

Dr. Marta Deyrup

University Libraries

Seton Hall University

Marta.deyrup@shu.edu

Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

 

Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy

Bucknell University will host its fifth annual digital scholarship conference (#BUDSC18) from October 5th-7th. The theme of the conference is “Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy.”

#BUDSC18 will bring together a community of practitioners–faculty, researchers, librarians, artists, educational technologists, students, administrators, and others–committed to promoting access to and through digital scholarship. We consider “access” in the broadest possible terms: accessible formats and technologies, access through universal design for learning, access to a mode of expression, access to stories that might not otherwise be heard or that might be lost over time, access to understanding and knowledge once considered beyond reach.

We encourage proposals that explore or critique digital scholarship as it relates to access, broadly conceived. Topics may include, but should not be limited to, the following:

  • Accessibility of digital platforms and technology
  • Access to resources to engage in or produce digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and social change
  • Sustainability and future access to digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and multimodal/interdisciplinary access
  • Access to  digital scholarship beyond the academy
  • The public mission of digital scholarship
  • Creating opportunities for diverse voices and perspectives
  • Designing for access, activism, and advocacy

Submissions may take the form of interactive presentations, project demos, electronic posters, panel discussions, work-in-progress sessions, workshops, lightning talks, or other creative formats.

We look forward to building on the success of the last four years, in which we have come together to discuss challenges, share working models, reflect on projects, and inspire new avenues for actively including students in public scholarly pursuits. For more information, please view our highlights from the 2017 meeting, the conference website and this year’s call.


Proposal Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/4nVllpVvaLEW9Jc02

Proposals are due:  June 30th, 8:00 PM, Eastern Time (US).
Notifications will be sent by July 15th.
If you have any questions please contact: budsc@bucknell.edu

VALUES AND ETHICS IN OPEN ACCESS

CALL FOR PANELISTS/ LIGHTNING TALKS/ PRESENTED POSTER

2018 STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

OPEN ACCESS SYMPOSIUM

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2018

LOCATION Stony Brook, NY

SUBMISSION DEADLINE July 17, 2018

Values and Ethics in Open Access, the 2018 Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium, is inviting applications for panelists, lightning talks, and presented posters.

In keeping with this year’s theme, we’re interested in speakers and posters that reflect the role of values and ethics in open access environments, systems, and practices. We welcome applications on myriad open access topics, including: open access policy, OER, open science & biomedicine, open humanities & social sciences, digital collections, predatory publishing, copyright, and scholarly communication.

APPLY We will receive and review applications until July 17, 2018.  Panels are 45 minutes, with 15 minutes of Q & A.  Lightning talks are 7 minutes.  Be prepared to submit your poster when you apply.  Registration fees are waived for participants. APPLY HERE

LEARN MORE Review the 2017 Stony Brook University Libraries Open Access Symposium, or contact Darren Chase, Head of Scholarly Communication.

Email darren.chase@stonybrook.edu

Call 631.632.9830