Category Archives: Scholarly Communication

Libraries, Archives, Museums and Digital Humanities

Deadline for submissions:
November 1, 2018
Southwest Popular/American Culture Association
contact email: stauffer@lsu.edu
Call for Papers

LIBRARIES, ARCHIVES, MUSEUMS AND DIGITAL HUMANITIES Southwest Popular / American Culture Association (SWPACA) 40th Annual Conference, February 20-23, 2019 Hyatt Regency Hotel & Conference Center Albuquerque, New Mexico http://www.southwestpca.org Proposal submission deadline: November 1, 2018

Proposals for papers and panels will be accepted beginning August 15 for the 40th annual SWPACA conference.  One of the nation’s largest interdisciplinary academic conferences, SWPACA offers nearly 70 subject areas, each typically featuring multiple panels.  For a full list of subject areas, area descriptions, and Area Chairs, please visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/call-for-papers/

The Libraries, Archives, Museums, and Digital Humanities in Popular Culture area solicits proposals from librarians, archivists, curators, graduate students, faculty, collectors, writers, independent scholars, and other aficionados (yes! including people who use libraries, archives, and museums!) of popular culture and cultural heritage settings of all types. We also encourage proposals for slide shows, video presentations, panels, and roundtables organized around common themes.

Some suggested topics include:

o   Histories and profiles of popular culture resources and collections in cultural heritage institutions; a chance to show off what you’ve got to scholars who might want to use it

o   Intellectual freedom or cultural sensitivity issues related to popular culture resources

o   Book clubs and reading groups, city- or campus-wide reading programs

o   Special exhibits of popular culture resources, outreach programs, etc. of cultural heritage institutions

o   Collection and organization of popular culture resources; marketing and ethical issues

o   Web 2.0, gaming, semantic web, etc. and their impact on libraries, archives, museums, and digital humanities collections

o   The role of public libraries, archives, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions in economic hard times and natural disasters

o   Oral history projects

o   Digital humanities and other digital/data-based projects on popular culture, the Southwest, and other relevant subjects, both those based in cultural heritage institutions and those in academia or other organizations.

All proposals must be submitted through the conference’s database at http://register.southwestpca.org/southwestpca

For details on using the submission database and on the application process in general, please see the Proposal Submission FAQs and Tips page at http://southwestpca.org/conference/faqs-and-tips/

Individual proposals for 15-minute papers must include an abstract of approximately 200-500 words. Including a brief bio in the body of the proposal form is encouraged, but not required.

For information on how to submit a proposal for a roundtable or a multi-paper panel, please view the above FAQs and Tips page.

SWPACA offers monetary awards for the best graduate student papers in a variety of categories. Submissions of accepted, full papers are due January 1, 2019.  For more information, visit http://southwestpca.org/conference/graduate-student-awards/

Registration and travel information for the conference is available at http://southwestpca.org/conference/conference-registration-information/

In addition, please check out the organization’s peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, Dialogue: The Interdisciplinary Journal of Popular Culture and Pedagogy, at http://journaldialogue.org/

If you have any questions about the LAMS & DIGITAL HUMANITIES area, please contact its Area Chair, Dr. Suzanne Stauffer stauffer@lsu.edu.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

ARLIS/NA Midstates

CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA) invites those engaged in work related to visual arts and information science to submit a proposal for a presentation at the annual Fall meeting on Friday, October 19th, 2018 in Indianapolis.  Submissions are welcomed in the following formats:

  • Presentations – a talk of 20 minutes, given by one or more presenter, with or without the use of visual aids
  • Lightening-round talks – a talk of 3-5 minutes, given by one presenter, with or without the use of visual aids; particularly suited for emerging trends
  • Poster presentations – a visual presentation in poster format about ongoing or completed projects; presenters may provide handouts and/or speak with viewers in an informal setting

Prospective presenters are encouraged to submit proposals on a variety of issues related to art, design, and visual culture, including:

  • book arts
  • cataloging issues
  • collaboration and partnerships across institutions
  • collection development
  • copyright and open access related to visual materials
  • critical librarianship
  • digital humanities
  • diversity and inclusion in the art library
  • information literacy for artists and art historians
  • museum librarianship
  • outreach to users
  • challenges in special collections
  • web archiving

Submission guidelines:

Submit an abstract of 300 words to Sarah Carter at saccarte@indiana.edu.  Specify your preferred presentation format (presentation, lightening round talk, poster presentation).

Submission deadline: Tuesday, September 18thFall meeting information:

Dates: Friday, October 19th, and Saturday, October 20th, 2018

Venue: Herron Art Library and IUPUI University Library

Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis

Indianapolis, IN

About ARLIS/NA Midstates:

The Midstates Chapter of the Art Libraries Society of North America is a dynamic group of library and information professionals dedicated to art, architecture, design and visual resources. The chapter serves the region including Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. Our members are art and architecture librarians, visual resources curators, museum professionals, archivists and special collections librarians, collectors and appreciators, book publishers and dealers, content providers, educators, artists, and students. The chapter meets twice a year, supporting our professional network, sharing information and visiting member institutions. We welcome all interested members of ARLIS/NA and all students enrolled in regional library and information science programs to become members of the Midstates Chapter. Participation in our meetings is open to all.

Journal of New Librarianship

EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI)

The EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI) is a community of higher education institutions and organizations committed to advancing learning through IT innovation. The ELI Annual Meeting provides an opportunity for those interested in learning, learning principles and practices, and learning technologies to explore, network, and share. Find more information about the ELI mission and philosophy here.

Transforming Higher Education: Exploring New Learning Horizons

The horizon of teaching and learning today is characterized by ever greater degrees of agency for learners, instructors, instructional designers, and technologists. From active learning classrooms to integrated student advising and from rapidly improving XR technologies to learning analytics, we all have more options for invention, innovation, and new designs in support of our teaching and learning mission. Join your colleagues as we collectively explore this ever-changing landscape of the new possibilities for learning, addressing these and many other questions:

  • What new kinds of leadership are required for this new teaching and learning landscape?
  • What are the best methods and techniques that promote innovation and creative thinking to support student learning?
  • What new educational technologies seem most promising?
  • What role should data and analytics play, and what are the trade-offs between analytics and privacy?
  • How can we best determine the efficacy of our learning innovations and technologies?
  • What learning spaces and environments best promote active learning?

2019 Annual Meeting Tracks

The strategic use of information technology has the ability to transform teaching and learning, helping institutions realize EDUCAUSE’s mission to advance higher education through the use of information technology. The following tracks include the best ways to navigate the learning horizons. Proposals that clearly describe innovative and creative work will receive the highest priority in the selection process.

  1. Accessibility and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
  2. Analytics: Privacy, Learning Data, Student Advising, and Interventions
  3. Digital and Information Literacy
  4. Faculty Development and Engagement
  5. Innovation in Instructional Design and Course Models
  6. Leadership and Academic Transformation
  7. Learning Efficacy: Impact Evaluation, Learning Research and Science
  8. Learning Environments and Spaces
  9. Learning Horizons: Emerging Technology, Ground-Breaking Practices, and Educational Futures
  10. Open Education
  11. Student Success
  12. Other

Learning Objectives and Participant Engagement Strategies

The ELI proposal reviewers will closely examine and rate each proposed session’s learning objectives, which should clearly describe what participants will know or be able to do as a result of participating in the session. A successful proposal must also include the specific and creative ways in which the presenter(s) will engage with participants through active learning strategies. ELI encourages innovative and participatory session design, the creative use of technology, and active engagement by all participants.

Session Types

All ELI Annual Meeting sessions will be conducted face-to-face in the meeting venue.

Preconference Workshops

Preconference workshops will be held Tuesday, February 19, from 8:00 to 11:00 a.m. (PT), face-to-face, in Anaheim, California. Up to two presenters from each seminar will be provided with a full complimentary registration to the annual meeting. Preconference workshops are intended to provide attendees with significant assistance in addressing their needs and opportunities to navigate the learning horizons. If you have questions, please contact the speaker liaison.

Present and Engage Sessions

Please note that your presentation session proposal will be carefully evaluated and may be accepted for any of the following formats below, depending on the scope of content and engagement strategies proposed. If you have questions, please contact the speaker liaison.

  • Interactive Presentation: Interactive presentations are opportunities to present in detail on a project, idea, or experience while enabling audience participation. These sessions require continuous engagement tactics, interspersed activity tactics, or intensive Q&A tactics. They are scheduled for 45 minutes, and at least 15 minutes of this time should be interactive.
  • Short Presentation Pairs: Presentation pairings include two 15-minute presentations (by different presenters) followed by a 15-minute question/discussion period, for a total of 45 minutes. This is a great way to organize closely related content with two unique perspectives. When you submit your proposal, you can suggest that your solo presentation be paired by the ELI Annual Meeting Program Team or you can coordinate with colleagues to suggest your paired team. Final pairings will be determined by ELI, based on proposal content. These highly visible sessions highlight pioneering practices by giving institutions a spotlighted venue with condensed presentation time. Please note these are not poster sessions.
  • Hands-On Workshop: Workshops are 45-minute sessions where participants experience technology or pedagogical practices firsthand. Note that these are not presentation sessions—they are activity sessions. Session descriptions should clearly indicate how presenters will guide a hands-on, tutorial-like experience using applications and resources. Participants are asked to bring a mobile device (e.g., smartphone, tablet, laptop) to the session in order to fully participate and to experience an emerging, innovative technology or practice. Hands-on workshops, by virtue of their robust interactive learning design, will have priority consideration for the active learning space (designed by Steelcase Education). Presenters are responsible for providing any additional technologies needed to ensure an engaging hands-on experience.

Discuss and Connect Sessions

  • Discussion Circle: This is ELI’s version of an unstructured, topic-driven discussion, somewhat like a conceptual jam session. The Discussion Circle is a way to engage with colleagues seeking common solutions to today’s greatest challenges on the learning horizon. Eschewing any presentation, discussion circle hosts facilitate conversations in small, intimate settings, allowing participants to take a deep dive into a pressing issue the community is tackling and for which the resolution is not obvious. These 45-minute sessions are highly interactive and provide a unique learning and bonding opportunity.
  • Posters: Posters give participants and presenters the opportunity to share and examine problems, issues, and solutions in a more casual, personal environment through informal, interactive, brief presentations focused on effective practices, research findings, or technical solutions. The standard setup for a poster includes a 6′-foot skirted table, wireless internet access, and boards. Posters are allocated 45 minutes of action, with ample time for setup and breakdown.

Please take a moment to view this 5-minute video on how to write an effective proposal. Following the tips in this video will increase the likelihood of your proposal being selected.

Library Research Roundtable Programs ALA 2019

LRRT is now accepting proposals for programs for the 2019 ALA Annual Conference.  Research-related presentations of all kinds are encouraged.  This CFP is in addition to the competitive 2019 LRRT Research Forum which will be open later this fall.

For information about submitting a program proposal for the 2019 Annual Conference to take place in Washington, D.C., June 20-25, 2019, as well as a link to the submission site, please visit: http://www.ala.org/news/member-news/2018/06/2019-ala-annual-conference-program-proposals-are-now-open

Important Dates

Call for Proposals Closes: August 31, 2018

Final Decisions: November 9, 2018

Schedule of Sessions Announced: December 5, 2018

For more information, please contact Jen Sweeney at jksweeney572@gmail.com.

Digitorium 2018

Event:                  Digitorium Digital Humanities Conference

When:                  Thursday, October 4 – Saturday, October 6, 2018

Where:                 University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL

for more information go to https://apps.lib.ua.edu/blogs/digitorium/cfp/

We are delighted to invite proposals for Digitorium 2018, a large-scale, international Digital Humanities conference to be held for the fourth time at The University of Alabama, October 4 – 6, 2018.

We seek proposals on Digital Humanities work from researchers, practitioners, and graduate students which showcase innovative ways in which digital methods have brought scholarship and scholarly communities to life, whether locally or globally. We especially welcome proposals which discuss the use of digital methods and their novel results for research, pedagogy, and public scholarship. The conference will host research presentations, roundtables, and workshops throughout the event for participants to gain new digital skills, and to share their expertise in using particular tools. The workshops allow participants to see the scholarly results of using a given digital tool (e.g., OpenRefine, oXygen, Story Maps, QGIS, Paper Machines, Visual Eyes, etc.), and then to learn how to use it themselves. For these sessions, we invite proposals from scholars interested in giving an initial 10-20 minute paper about their research project followed by leading a 30-40 minute hands-on workshop in which they will teach other participants how to use one of the digital tools deployed for the research presentation.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

We have two key “pathways” for which participants can submit abstracts:

  • Digital Methods: presentations on exciting new applications of digital methods, whether to bring an under-served subject to public attention, or to break new ground in established fields.
  • Digital Pedagogy and Public Scholarship: presentations on the use of digital methods in innovative teaching approaches, and for public outreach by universities, libraries, museums, and other institutions who are engaging communities via digital scholarship.

Proposals:

We seek proposals for the following types of presentation for the conference:

  • 20-minute papers.
  • 5-minute lightning talks.
  • Workshops: a 10-20 minute paper followed by leading a hands-on workshop using the tool employed for your research (see above for details).
  • Posters.
  • Digital exhibits
    • Bring your digital exhibit to the conference and present it as you would a poster.
  • Workshops to share techniques which you have found useful.
  • Roundtables.
  • Experiential presentations
    • 20-30 minute workshop-style presentations walking your audience through a digital method which you have used for specific scholarly outcomes.
  • Panels of three or four 20-minute papers or two experiential presentations.
  • Panels comprised of a whole project team.

All proposals should be made via the Submissions page on the conference website.

Deadline for submitting abstracts is July 27, 2018.

For more information about the conference, including our plenary speakers, the venue, and the departments generously offering their support for this event, please explore our website. If you have any questions please feel free to contact Thomas C. Wilson, Associate Dean for Research & Technology at tcwilson@ua.edu.

Digitorium is made possible by the generous support of the University Libraries at The University of Alabama.

Preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

 

Dr. Marta Deyrup

University Libraries

Seton Hall University

Marta.deyrup@shu.edu

Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

 

Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy

Bucknell University will host its fifth annual digital scholarship conference (#BUDSC18) from October 5th-7th. The theme of the conference is “Digital Scholarship: Expanding Access, Activism, and Advocacy.”

#BUDSC18 will bring together a community of practitioners–faculty, researchers, librarians, artists, educational technologists, students, administrators, and others–committed to promoting access to and through digital scholarship. We consider “access” in the broadest possible terms: accessible formats and technologies, access through universal design for learning, access to a mode of expression, access to stories that might not otherwise be heard or that might be lost over time, access to understanding and knowledge once considered beyond reach.

We encourage proposals that explore or critique digital scholarship as it relates to access, broadly conceived. Topics may include, but should not be limited to, the following:

  • Accessibility of digital platforms and technology
  • Access to resources to engage in or produce digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and social change
  • Sustainability and future access to digital scholarship
  • Digital scholarship and multimodal/interdisciplinary access
  • Access to  digital scholarship beyond the academy
  • The public mission of digital scholarship
  • Creating opportunities for diverse voices and perspectives
  • Designing for access, activism, and advocacy

Submissions may take the form of interactive presentations, project demos, electronic posters, panel discussions, work-in-progress sessions, workshops, lightning talks, or other creative formats.

We look forward to building on the success of the last four years, in which we have come together to discuss challenges, share working models, reflect on projects, and inspire new avenues for actively including students in public scholarly pursuits. For more information, please view our highlights from the 2017 meeting, the conference website and this year’s call.


Proposal Submission Form: https://goo.gl/forms/4nVllpVvaLEW9Jc02

Proposals are due:  June 30th, 8:00 PM, Eastern Time (US).
Notifications will be sent by July 15th.
If you have any questions please contact: budsc@bucknell.edu

VALUES AND ETHICS IN OPEN ACCESS

CALL FOR PANELISTS/ LIGHTNING TALKS/ PRESENTED POSTER

2018 STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

OPEN ACCESS SYMPOSIUM

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2018

LOCATION Stony Brook, NY

SUBMISSION DEADLINE July 17, 2018

Values and Ethics in Open Access, the 2018 Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium, is inviting applications for panelists, lightning talks, and presented posters.

In keeping with this year’s theme, we’re interested in speakers and posters that reflect the role of values and ethics in open access environments, systems, and practices. We welcome applications on myriad open access topics, including: open access policy, OER, open science & biomedicine, open humanities & social sciences, digital collections, predatory publishing, copyright, and scholarly communication.

APPLY We will receive and review applications until July 17, 2018.  Panels are 45 minutes, with 15 minutes of Q & A.  Lightning talks are 7 minutes.  Be prepared to submit your poster when you apply.  Registration fees are waived for participants. APPLY HERE

LEARN MORE Review the 2017 Stony Brook University Libraries Open Access Symposium, or contact Darren Chase, Head of Scholarly Communication.

Email darren.chase@stonybrook.edu

Call 631.632.9830

5th Annual LILi Conference: It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

5th Annual LILi Conference  Friday, August 17, 2018, 9 am – 1:30 pm Glendale Public Library 222 E Harvard St, Glendale, CA 91205

It’s Not Just Academic: Bridging Gaps with Information Empowerment in All Libraries

Proposal Deadline: Friday, April 20, 2018

How has your library fostered information empowerment among its users? LILi invites you to share your library or program’s innovative teachable moments by submitting proposals with practical applications. Lifelong learning and information literacy (IL) development occurs in countless contexts and communities, within and outside the library. Given the skills required to compete in a rapidly changing modern knowledge economy, we can learn from our colleagues in all types of libraries. Possible topics include, but are not limited to the following, all as related to information empowerment:

  • Community outreach and organizing strategies
  • DIY publications (e.g., zines, podcasts, blogs, apps) and other knowledge sharing creations
  • Programming for various populations, including children, teens, seniors, immigrants, English language learners, and other marginalized groups
  • Workshops, one-shots, credit courses, and training sessions supporting students/users/patrons in online and face-to-face settings
  • Community archiving
  • Metaliteracy
  • Data Literacy
  • Digital citizenship
  • Makerspace and escape room activities that foster transferable problem solving skills
  • Open educational resource (OER) and open pedagogy initiatives

LILi invites you to submit proposals with practical application and built-in audience interaction by April 20, 2018 for a 15-minute presentation. Notification of acceptance by May 18, 2018.

Submit proposals here: http://bit.ly/2GT4pzB

LILi Conference Code of Conduct: http://campusguides.glendale.edu/lili/ConductCode

Questions? Annie Knight (knight_annie@sac.edu) or Susie Chin (schin@glendale.edu)