Category Archives: Women’s and Gender Studies

2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

WORK: GSISC 18

 

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

Special Issue: Women & Language- Transcending the Acronym: Genders, Sexes, Sexualities, and Gender Identities Beyond “LGBT”

Guest Editor: Leland G. Spencer, Miami University

Article Deadline: January 31, 2018

Critical studies of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity have many goals, and certainly one includes the effort to trouble, interrogate, and upend binaries, dichotomies, and rigid categories—and the naturalization thereof. Despite these underlying theoretical commitments many of us share, research about sexuality and gender identity often subtly reinscribes many of the categories and even binaries it purports to disavow. The ubiquitous initialism LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender), sometimes extended to become more inclusive by adding a Q for “queer” or “questioning” or an A for “ally” or “asexual,” often obscures as much as it clarifies. For instance, the acronym problematically conflates gender identity and sexuality, leading to dubious conclusions in articles that claim to report results about “LGBT” people but have actually only surveyed cisgender gay and lesbian people. The acronym also leaves out a range of sexualities and gender identities, and the ones it represents overemphasize colonized, Western, and White understandings of sexuality and gender identity.

Thus, this special issue invites articles that explore identities and expressions of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity not typically contained in the acronym, including analyses that interrogate the acronym and its hegemony as such. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

  • pansexuality,
  • asexuality,
  • skoliosexuality,
  • agender,
  • genderqueer,
  • quare,
  • intersex,
  • two spirit,
  • polyamory,
  • third gender,
  • gender fluidity,
  • and many more.

All types of original research are welcome, including but not limited to: quantitative, qualitative, rhetorical, critical, theoretical, historical, performative, creative/artistic, and autoethnographic. Contributions that consider intersections of various axes of difference are especially encouraged, as are articles that consider non-Western understandings of gender, sex, sexuality, and gender identity. Articles may have any of the following goals (again, not an exhaustive list):

  • definition and theorization of terms,
  • offering histories and best practices for language use,
  • analysis of experiences of persons at particular social locations,
  • criticism of portrayals or representations in media,
  • theoretically informed analysis of personal experiences,
  • social movement criticism,
  • or examination of the influence of social institutions such as education, statist violence, religion, workplaces and the economy, or healthcare practices.

Articles should follow the general guidelines for manuscripts to be submitted to Women & Language but should be submitted by email to Dr. Leland G. Spencer, spencelg@miamioh.edu. Inquiries about the issue may be sent to the same email address.

Article deadline: January 31, 2018 

A PDF version of this call may be downloaded at: https://tinyurl.com/WL-Call-LGS

3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018: Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community

Call for Proposals

Deadline November 15, 2017

Submit proposals here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference is promoted by the Joint Council for Librarians of Color whose purpose is “To promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and to host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color every four to five years.”

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision makers interested in exploring inclusive policies and practices in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC strives to deepen connections across constituencies, create spaces for dialogue, promote the telling and celebrating of one’s stories, and encourage the transformation of libraries into more democratic and diverse organizations. This conference is sponsored by the five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association: the American Indian Library Association (AILA), Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA). JCLC 2018 follows the first gathering in 2006 in Dallas, TX and the second in 2012 in Kansas City, MO.

The 2018 JCLC Steering Committee invites you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community”. Proposal submission deadlines are listed below.

What’s on the page:

JCLC Tracks and Topics

JCLC 2018 seeks conference session presentations in all areas of diversity, including, but not limited to, the topics below, focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.” Ideal sessions will provide:

  • Insights, skills, tools, and strategies that stress solutions, implementation, and practical applications
  • Highlight exemplary programs, approaches, and models
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, and understanding around significant issues affecting conference constituencies
  • Discuss efforts to create more inclusive environments, curricula, and programs.

The Program Committee will strive to select a balance of academic, school, tribal, special, and public libraries learning opportunities.

  • Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration
    Marketing; outreach to diverse populations; community collaborations; user spaces; public policy; health education; using census data and other government information; cultural programming; services to and rebuilding of communities hit with disaster; research; undocumented, urban, rural and low-income communities; etc.
  • Collections, Programs and Services
    Ethnic and multicultural collections; film and music; information literacy; children’s, youth and adult programming; programs for diverse populations; reference; instruction; grant funded programs; technical services; archives; preservation; digital inclusion; documenting traditional knowledge; research; cataloging/subject headings/controlled vocabulary; etc.
  • Bridge Building, Intersectionality and Inclusion
    Fostering awareness, acceptance, and inclusion of all communities; disabilities; gender; celebrating elders; religion; sexual orientation/LGBTQIA populations; nationality; sharing traditional knowledge; serving the incarcerated; immigrant and refugees; cross cultural issues; transnational communities; multiculturalism; best practices and model programs promoting bridge building, intersectionality, and inclusion; microaggressions; cultural humility; etc.
  • Leadership, Management and Organizational Development
    Administration; staff development/training; recruitment and retention; leadership; organizational culture; management; cultural competencies; mentoring; assessment; mid-career strategies; staff and paraprofessional issues; conflict resolution and mediation; reorganization and restructuring; leading during tight economic times; institutional change; research; fundraising; institutional racism; breaking the glass ceiling; etc.
  • Technology and Innovation
    Teaching and learning; emerging technologies; e-repositories; social networking applications; digitization; equal access for users; library tools; e-books; mobile devices; widgets; mashups; online learning and collaboration; open access movements; social aspects of technology and implications for use; videos; etc.

Session Formats

All sessions are 75 minutes long with the exception of preconferences (Preconference programs may be either 4 or 8 hours) and may take one of the following formats:

  • Panel Presentation
  • Individual Paper/Presentation
  • Roundtable
  • Workshop
  • Poster Session
  • Film with discussion
  • Preconferences

JCLC will also accept proposals in different formats (other than those listed above) that will excite, engage, and create a new learning environment for conference attendees. Proposals may be accepted on the condition of combining proposed sessions into a single session with other proposals or as a different format than originally accepted.

Prohibited Submissions

Program proposals promoting or selling products/services during conference sessions will not be accepted.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on November 15, 2017. No late submissions will be accepted. Notifications of proposal selection will be made on a rolling basis beginning on January 15, 2018 and ending on February 15, 2018.

Selection Criteria

All proposals will be reviewed by the JCLC Program Committee. Proposals are evaluated on quality and clarity of content, uniqueness of topic, relevance to conference attendees, ability to engage the audience, and the relationship of the proposal to the mission and theme of the conference, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.”
All presenters of selected programs must register for the conference. Only registered participants will be allowed to present.

Proceedings

JCLC will encourage the selected conference presenters, in all formats, to publish their content using the online conference program application. The content will be directly linked to the program abstract and remain posted for one year. It is recommended that all program content be uploaded by the day of the presentation. Authors will retain copyright to their original work and are encouraged to publish their content in other established venues.

Submission site

Please submit your proposal here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

Questions

Many questions can be answered on the FAQ. Questions not answered in the FAQs may be sent to the JCLC Programs Committee at jclc2018programs@gmail.com.


Bi Women Quarterly

*Dear Women’s Studies Folks,*

*I’m the editor of /Bi Women Quarterly, /a VERY grassroots quarterly
publication.
*

*You can read current and about 9 years of back issues at
www.biwomenboston.org, and older issues of this 35-year-old project are
available in digitized format at Harvard’s Schlesinger Library.*

_*Spring 2018: Chosen Family*_

_**_Chosen families are groups of people who deliberately choose to play
significant roles in each other’s lives. Who makes up your chosen
family? How did you come to find each other? What does your chosen
family mean to you and your bi+ identity?
*Submissions for this is are due by February 1.
*

*Submission guidelines can be found here
<http://biwomenboston.org/newsletter/submission-guidelines/>.*

*~Robyn Ochs

Unruly Catholic Women Volume 4

Call for Submissions (extended): Third- and Fourth-Wave Catholic Women Writers: The Future of Unruly Women in the Catholic Church.  Jeana DelRosso, Leigh Eicke, and Ana Kothe seek contributions for the fourth volume in their Unruly Catholic Women series.  In this volume, we seek creative pieces by third- and fourth-wave feminists on Roman Catholicism, with an eye to the future of the Catholic Church.  Please submit autobiographical stories, fictional pieces, prose, or poems tojdelrosso@ndm.edu AND anam.kothe@upr.edu by 17 December 2017, for consideration.  All submissions must be in English.

Dr. Jeana DelRosso
Professor of English and Women’s Studies
Director of the Morrissy Honors Program
Notre Dame of Maryland University
4701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD  21210
jdelrosso@ndm.edu

2018 Transformative Learning Conference

March 8-9, 2018
Downtown Oklahoma City, OK

March 7, 2018, Pre-Conference Institute, Edmond, OK

For more information go to http://sites.uco.edu/central/tl/conference/2018conference/about.asp

The Transformative Learning Conference emerged seven years ago as a venue for UCO faculty to share their experiences, strategies, and challenges of incorporating transformative learning into their courses.  In 2015, the Conference moved off campus and became a national discussion on applied TL.  The following year, international scholars joined the Conference.  In the last several years, around 350 scholars have joined the discussion each year, considering everything from conceptualizing and measuring TL to creating official student records of their transformative education. This year’s conference includes a pre-conference institute, March 7, 2018, for teams of two or more from institutions launching or implementing “Beyond Disciplinary Learning,” which we refer to as “STLR” (Student Transformative Learning Record) at UCO.

 

Mission

The mission of the Transformative Learning Conference is to support, promote, and foster individuals interested in discussing, implementing, or measuring transformative education. In 2006, the hosting institution, the University of Central Oklahoma, added transformative learning to its mission:

 

The University of Central Oklahoma (UCO) exists to help students learn by providing transformative education experiences to students so that they may become productive, creative, ethical and engaged citizens and leaders serving our global community. 

 

Important Deadlines

Registration Opens:  June 8, 2017 

Deadline for Early Pricing of Registration: January, 12, 2018 at 11:59 PM

Regular rates apply: January 13, 2018 – March 9, 2018

Call for Proposals Opens:  August 29, 2017

Deadline for Submissions: November 26, 2017 at 11:59 pm

Deadline for Notification of Acceptance by: December 18, 2017

Accepted authors that have not registered for the conference by January 12, 2018 will be withdrawn from the program

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided

CALL FOR CHAPTER CONTRIBUTORS

The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and
beyond.

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.
Trump

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or
contemporarily

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT (hbmgpt@rit.edu) by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration
elsewhere.

YTH Live 2018

YTH Live is the conference that ignites innovation in youth, technology, and health. Plus, this year will mark the 10 year anniversary of the conference making it the biggest yet.

YTH Live takes place May 6-7, 2018 in San Francisco, CA. The conference includes sessions on video games, non profit outreach, mobile apps, texting, and social media all being used to address issues like mental health, reproductive rights, peer education, drug use, HIV and AIDS, STDs, and more. Information can be found at http://yth.org/ythlive/about/

At YTH Live 2018, attendees will meet youth leaders, app developers, hackers, designers, health workers, policymakers, as well as educators, researchers, and other advocates who are using technology to make a difference in the health and wellness of youth.

Learn more at yth.org/live and register at yth.org/register. Click here for additional assets and if you need drafted social media posts or any other materials let us know and we would be happy to provide those for you.

Our call for abstracts is now open, where those who want to share an innovative project, campaign, program, or research in youth health, technology, and health tech are invited to submit a proposal, to be considered to speak at our conference. The deadline for this is Friday, October 27, 2017. We’d love to invite you to submit and to share this opportunity with your networks!

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.

VIEW Journal Call for Papers on “Audiovisual Data in Digital Humanities”

Considering the relevance of audiovisual material as perhaps the biggest wave of data to come in the near future (Smith, 2013, IBM prospective study) its relatively modest position within the realm of Digital Humanities conferences is remarkable. The objective of this special issue for VIEW is to present current research in that field on a variety of epistemological, historiographical and technological issues that are specific for digital methods applied to audiovisual data. We strive to cover a great range of media and data types and of applications representing the various stages of the research process.

The following key topics / problems / questions are of special interest:

  1. Do computational approaches to sound and (moving) images extend or/and change our conceptual and epistemological understanding of these media? What are the leading machine learning approaches to the study of audio and visual culture and particularly time-based media? How do these approaches, models, and methods of learning relate to acquiring and producing knowledge by the conventional means of reading and analyzing text? Do we understand the 20th century differently through listening to sounds and voices and viewing images than through reading texts? How does massive digitization and online access relate to the concept of authenticity and provenance?
  2. What tools in the sequence of the research process – search, annotation, vocabulary, analysis, presentation – are best suited to work with audio-visual data? The ways in which we structure and process information are primarily determined by the convention of attributing meaning to visual content through text. Does searching audio-visual archives, annotating photos or film clips, analyzing a corpus of city sounds, or presenting research output through a virtual exhibition, require special dedicated tools? What is the diversity in requirements within the communities of humanities scholars? How can, for example, existing commercial tools or software be repurposed for scholarly use?
  3. What are the main hurdles for the further expansion of AV in DH? Compared to text, audiovisual data as carriers of knowledge are a relatively young phenomenon. Consequently the question of ‘ownership’ and the commercial value of many audiovisual sources result in considerable constraints for use due to issues of copyright. A constraint of a completely different order, is the intensive investment in time needed when listening to or watching an audiovisual corpus, compared to reading a text. Does the law or do technologies for speech and image retrieval offer solutions to overcome these obstacles?

Practicals
Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, digital humanities, television and media history.
Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on October 2nd , 2017.
Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 1st week of November 2017.
Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on 15 th of February 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.
For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mark Williams (Associate Professor Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College U.S.), Pelle Snickars (Prof. of Media Studies Umea Univesity, Sweden) or Andreas Fickers (Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History).

About VIEW Journal
See http://www.viewjournal.eu/ for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.