ALA Video Round Table Program Committee (VRT), ALA New Orleans 2018

Thinking about attending the ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans (June 21-26, 2018)?

Have you worked on any projects or activities involving film or video at your institution?

The ALA Video Round Table Program Committee (VRT) would like to encourage you to submit program proposals for one-hour informational sessions at ALA Annual on just about anything related to video and libraries! Please note that you will not be submitting directly to the VRT Program Committee but through the ALA Program Proposal Submission Site (login or create a new account to enter).

Proposals are due in just a few weeks so get them in soon – the deadline is August 25, 2017!

Instructions for submitting your proposal are available online.

Sample ideas include but are not limited to:

  • Are you finding new ways to promote films to your community?
  • Are you doing anything interesting in curating your film collections?
  • Have you made library promotional videos?
  • Have you created video tutorials?
  • Are you using film clips (or gifs) in instruction?
  • Have you created a media center for your patrons?
  • Do you work with your patrons in video creation?
  • Are you involved with film or video preservation?
  • Have you offered special film programming/events at your library?

ALA is especially looking for program ideas that encourage collaboration and support diversity and submissions from all types of libraries (public, school, academic, special) are welcome.   

Suffrage Supporters of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1900-1920

Beginning in June 2015, we at Women and Social Movements in the United States launched a crowdsourcing project that will result in the online publication of the “Online Biographical Dictionary of the Woman Suffrage Movement in the United States.”  When completed in 2020 this resource will include about 2,500 biographical sketches of women supporters of woman suffrage campaigns in the first two decades of the twentieth century.

The Online Dictionary will include three distinct groups of woman suffragists: about 350 supporters of the militant suffrage group, the National Woman’s Party, including women who picketed in 1917-1919 in Washington, D.C., New York and Boston to protest the slowness with which the administration of President Woodrow Wilson embraced the woman suffrage cause; about 100 Black women suffragists whose writings have been collected and published on the website; finally, more than 2,000 mainstream suffrage supporters affiliated with the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA), whose names are listed in state reports printed in volume 6 of the History of Woman Suffrage (1922).

NAWSA supporters are recorded in reports covering state-level suffrage activism between 1900 and 1920. Taking advantage of the state residence information in these reports, we have organized this part of the work by state and are seeking historians and history students interested in researching and writing 500-word biographical sketches of suffrage supporters in their state.  We have been particularly interested in finding faculty who might assign biographical sketches to their students as part of courses they are teaching.  In the first phase of our work we have received excellent sketches written by high school, community college, and four-year college students, working under the direction of their history faculty.  We also have had volunteers who are graduate students or independent historians, who have written one or two biographical sketches.  On the current NAWSA portion of the project, we are also seeking historians, librarians, or museum or historical society staff who would be interested in serving as state coordinators, taking responsibility to recruit additional volunteers and copyedit completed biographical sketches of suffrage supporters in their state.  As of this writing (July 2016), we still need state coordinators for 17 states.  Follow this link for a listing of those states.

To facilitate review the state reports on which the NAWSA activists crowdsourcing is based, we have posted a .pdf version of The History of Woman Suffrage, vol. 6, 1900-1920 on this site. Click here to view the volume. For access to a research guide for volunteers preparing bio sketches, click here. To view a sample biographical sketch to use as a template, click here. This sample includes further suggestions for sketch writers.

If you are in a position to join in one of these capacities, please contact project director, Tom Dublin at tdublin@binghamton.edu.  We need volunteers who can write biographical sketches between 2016 and 2018 in order to post the sketches on the website in 2019 and 2020, in time for the centennial of the passage of the nineteenth amendment which assured all women in the United States the right to vote.  We will follow up this project description with periodic updates tracking the progress of our work.  Please join us in this important work and let others know about this prospect.

 

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II

Call for abstracts for! The deadline is Aug 1 – and we’re looking forward to seeing
your ideas! For more information, contact Ann Braithwaite,
abraithwaite@upei.ca and/or Catherine Orr, orrc@beloit.edu

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies – Volume II

(under contract with Routledge/Taylor and Francis)

Call for Chapter Proposals – August 1, 2017

Catherine M. Orr and Ann Braithwaite, Editors

Rethinking Women’s and Gender Studies II (RWGS II) is an anthology that
addresses the complexities and inherent paradoxes of the expansive
knowledge project known as Women’s and Gender Studies (WGS) for audiences
both inside and adjacent to the field. RWGS II continues the work of Rethinking
Women’s and Gender Studies (Routledge 2012)
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>
but
seeks to complement rather than merely update it. It is both the same, in
that it explores key terms and common narratives, and different, in that it
stretches its scope of exploration vis-à-vis new terms that now circulate
both in WGS and other interdisciplinary knowledge projects. Thus, our focus
in this new volume is more future oriented in that we want authors to think
about what terms are crossing field boundaries and where those
boundary-crossings can take us.*

List of Possible Terms Include (but are not limited to): Nation,
Decoloniality, Race, Anti/Blackness, Inclusion, Consent, Women of Color,
Whiteness, Indigeneity, Women, Cis-, Citizenship, Masculinity, Disability,
Diversity, Affect, Social Justice, Non-human animals, Eco-feminism,
Critical, Civic Engagement, Experience/Experiential Learning, Branding,
Inclusive Excellence, The Ph.D., Violence, Expertise, Entrepreneurship

In exploring a term, we ask each contributor contemplate the following
questions:

How are you positioned in relation to the field of WGS? What moves you
to take up this particular term?

How does this term function in WGS–intellectually, institutionally,
administratively, and/or pedagogically?

What are some of the tensions within WGS generated by this term?

How does this term point to, overlap, or contradict other theoretical
languages, approaches, and fields?

How does this term reflect different temporalities (disciplinary
histories, “times,” career clocks, or generations) within or beyond WGS?

What would a reconsideration of this term offer to WGS as a knowledge
project?

Chapter Proposals DUE August 1, 2017:  500-word abstract that addresses
some or all of above questions plus bio or short CV. Send to:
orrc@beloit.edu and abraithwaite@upei.ca

Final Draft of Chapters DUE: January 10, 2018.  6000 words maximum
(including endnotes), Times New Roman, 12-point manuscript text with
one-inch margins.

*More about  RWGS II:

As with RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II focuses on asking how certain terms come to be taken-for-granted in
WGS, exploring both the unacknowledged assumptions and subsequent
unintended consequences of their use. Identifying and interrogating the
functions and effects of these terms continues to reflect our understanding
of WGS as a knowledge project, one that asks questions about how we come to
know something as much as what it is we claim to know.  As such, RWGS
II continues
to interrogate the field through a double(d) lens, insisting that the
languages that circulate in the field constitute both our methods of
analysis and our objects of study.

Using the same organizational approach of constructing critical genealogies
of key terms as in RWGS
<https://www.amazon.com/Rethinking-Womens-Gender-Studies-Catherine/dp/0415808316/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496332594&sr=8-1&keywords=rethinking+women%27s+and+gender+studies>,
RWGS II extends that earlier project, now unpacking, exploring, and
accounting for terms that are not necessarily unique to WGS but that are
nevertheless influential in its current understandings and practices.
Think, for instance, of terms that circulate just as much in
interdisciplinary projects adjacent to WGS (e.g., Ethnic Studies,
Indigenous Studies, Disability Studies, Queer Studies, Prison Studies,
Social Justice Studies) as they do in WGS. We think of these terms as sites
of encounter that are characterized just as much by agreement and consensus
as by contestation and conflict as they cross inter/disciplinary
boundaries. Their mobilization in WGS has the potential to excite and
agitate the field imaginary in ways that are both productive and
problematic for the present and future(s) of  WGS.

Likewise, RWGS II aims to further explore the ways in which WGS always
works both within and against the institution within which it is located,
through a variety of terms and narratives that take the university itself
as a site of encounter in need of further interrogation. What happens if
those terms are faced head on, and even embraced by and in the name of WGS?
What productive work of social change, and of critical reflection on the
relationships between identity/knowledge/power, can occur when WGS—uneasily
to be sure—encounters these terms and practices them “otherwise?” Can such
counterintuitive moves illuminate new–as yet unthought–futures of WGS?
Can embracing a politics of engagement (rather than a politics of refusal)
reveal new genealogies and different trajectories for and of this field, in
academia and beyond?

Violence Against Women: Special Issue on Gender-based violence on college campuses

Submissions for a special issue of the journal *Violence Against Women* are
sought from scholars and community activists working to end gender based
violence on college campuses. Papers in the special issue will examine
activist and other transformational responses to GBV by students, faculty
and staff, and the ways they are enacting change locally to challenge the
scaffolding of GBV, often described as rape culture (Buchwald, Fletcher &
Roth, 2005; Henry & Powell, 2014), lad culture (Phipps and Young, 2015),
and laddism (Lewis, Marine, & Kenney, 2016). The prioritising of
programmatic, solution-based interventions to tackle GBV in the university
context poses unique challenges to meaningful cultural transformation,
which this volume will productively explore. The special issue provides an
opportunity for critical engagement with institutional policies and
practices in terms of how they contribute to or inhibit cultural
transformation.

Abstracts of 250 words should be submitted by *August 7th* to *Dr. Ruth
Lewis *(ruth.lewis@northumbria.ac.uk) and *Dr. Susan Marine* (
marines@merrimack.edu).

Social Network Analysis, Learning Analytics, & Adaptive Learning: Keeping up with big data

ICEM Graduate Students Panel Presentations in Emerging Technologies

AECT 2017 conference, Jacksonville, FL., U.S.A.

Hyatt Regency Jacksonville Riverfront
November 7 – November 11, 2017
Jacksonville, Florida        

An active professional community should observe and facilitate the contributions of graduate students.  ICEM-USA has long history of support for graduate students’ professional and personal growth. ICEM-USA is committed to build and support a learning community for ICEM graduate students.

Goals

  1. This panel discussion is a collaborative session that provides a forum for graduate students from all over the world to share their research and practices in emerging technologies at AECT 2017 conference, Jacksonville, FL., U.S.A.

  2. Up to six panelists will be selected.  Each student would have 5-10 minutes (vary from the numbers of participants)  to present their current research or practices on the annual emerging technology theme.

  3. An ICEM-USA professional member will facilitate this panel discussion while ICEM-USA professional members will serve as commentators at the end of the discussions to support graduate students panelists to continue and improving their professional growth in the theme topics.

Theme for 2017: Social Network Analysis, Learning Analytics, & Adaptive Learning: Keeping up with big data

  • Any topics in the annual theme, particularly the combinations of different areas, but not limited to.

  • The topics can be research based, practices, technology demonstration, case study etc.

 Eligibility:

  • Any graduate students who study anywhere on earth at the time of submitting the proposals.

  • If the proposal is accepted, the participants are required:

    • to agree to present at the AECT annual conference

    • to register for the AECT annual conference.

    • to join as an AECT student member

Submission

  • Proposal Due Date: July 20, 2017

  • Author Notification: July 31, 2017

  • Proposal: One-page in length.  E-mail to Chih-Hsiung Tu at: Chih.Tu@nau.edu

For more information see: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1kB-dx–GYZ2mp5DE52hMfR14YMdaaL_dpih13D1yWCA/edit?usp=sharing

Please forward any correspondence to Chih-Hsiung Tu Ph.D., ICEM-U.S.A. Deputy, at Chih.Tu@Nau.edu.

 

Advances in Library Administration and Organization Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Publication due 2019
Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College
Volume Editor: Janet Crum, Northern Arizona University

Libraries have begun doing more to support entrepreneurship and innovation
within their communities. Makerspaces and business incubators have become
featured attractions in public and academic libraries and provide a unique way
to reach out to a user group that can bolster a community in dynamic ways.
ALAO seeks submissions for the “Supporting Entrepreneurship and Innovation”
volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to look at how library
leaders can develop support for innovation and entrepreneurship within their
libraries.  Examples include but are not limited to: analyzing case studies
from several institutions to identify best practices; ways of designing
library spaces to ensure they meet the needs of all constituents; theoretical
discussions on how activities/spaces supporting entrepreneurship and
innovation reflect the mission of libraries; creative ways to get resources to
support efforts in these areas; how these areas can lead to new kinds of
collaborations that benefit libraries.

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:
How the historical and cultural role of libraries has changed (or not) to
include services that support creativity and innovation
How and why the development of makerspaces and incubators (or other innovative
programs) supports the larger community in which the library is situated
How innovative and entrepreneurial support develops new partnerships, and how
those partnerships can be sustained.

This will be the first volume of Advances in Library Administration and
Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2019.
About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series
ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical
developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library
administration and organization.  The series answers the questions, “How have
libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a
platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across
issues, in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot.  Through this
series, practitioners can glean new approaches in challenging times and
collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional
quandaries.

How to submit
If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send an abstract
of 300 words or less as well as author details and estimated length of final
submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu by August 31, 2017.

Submission deadlines
Submission deadline for proposals: August 31, 2017
Notification of acceptance sent by:  October 31, 2017
Submission deadline for full chapters:  February 15, 2018
Comments returned to authors:  April 30, 2018
Submission deadline for chapter revisions:  June 30, 2018

Social Justice and Activism in Libraries, Moving Beyond Diversity to Action

Book Publisher: McFarland

Su Epstein, Ph.D., co-editor. Director, Saxton B. Little Free Library,
Columbia, Connecticut
Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Public Library Systems, Special, School Librarian,
Michigan.
Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor. Reference Librarian, Valencia College, Winter
Park, Florida.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school,
special librarians, LIS faculty, sharing how to take the concept of diversity
to the next level. The role librarians can play in social justice and social
change, activities supporting tolerance in libraries. Topics could be
inclusivity, tolerance, civic engagement, civic education, human rights,
social responsibility; in the areas of collection development, programming,
professional development, partnerships and outreach—just to name a few.

One author or two or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one
complimentary copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many
co-authors or if one or two chapters: author discount on more copies.
Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapters each described in a few sentences by
July 30, 2017, brief bio on each author; place TOL, YOUR LAST NAME on subject
line to: epsteinsc@gmail.com

Handbook of Research on E-Assessment in Higher Education

http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/submit/2812

IMPORTANT DATES July 15, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline  July 25, 2017: Notification of Acceptance  November 15, 2017: Full Chapter Submission  January 15, 2018: Review Results Returned  February 28, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification  March 15, 2018: Final Chapter Submission

Editors:

Ana Azevedo, CEOS.PP-ISCAP/IPP, aazevedo@iscap.ipp.pt  José Azevedo, CEOS.PP-ISCAP/IPP, jazevedo@iscap.ipp.pt 

Introduction:

Assessment profoundly influences the motivation of those who learn, shapes their perspectives about learning and therefore plays a key role in the educational process. The introduction of different assessment systems has important impacts throughout the educational process (Botički & Milašinović, 2008; Brown, 2001; Bull & Danson, 2001; Frankland, 2007; Garfield & Ben-Zvi, 2008; Holmes, 2015; Jacob, Issac, & Sebastian, 2006; Jarvis, Holford, & Griffin, 2003; JISC, 2007; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Scouller, 1998; Smith et al., 1996; Stödberg, 2012; Wild, Triggs, & Pfannkuch, 1997). In the last years, the emergence of a new paradigm valuing the student as the central subject in the construction of their learning, requires new pedagogical approaches, and diversified methods (Botički & Milašinović, 2008; Llamas-Nistal, Fernández-Iglesias, González-Tato, & Mikic-Fonte, 2013; Mora, Sancho-Bru, Iserte, & Sánchez, 2012; Rod, Eiksund, & Fjaer, 2010). According to Redecker e Johannessen (2013), changes in pedagogical practices and in the learning processes can only happen when also changing assessment.

Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) place challenges and at the same time offer teachers tools to create differentiated learning opportunities for students. The use of ICT in the assessment process is thus unavoidable, through electronic assessment, or e-assessment. In this case, ICT is used throughout the evaluation process from the design of the tests to the storage of the results (Stödberg, 2012). One possible approach is to develop specific environments for this purpose (Botički & Milašinović, 2008; Dascalu & Bodea, 2010; Llamas-Nistal et al., 2013). Another approach is the use of the so-called Learning Management Systems (LMS) (Burrow, Evdorides, Hallam, & Freer-hewish, 2005; Salas-Morera, Cubero-Atienza, Redel-Macías, Arauzo-Azofra, & García-Hernández, 2012). LMS have the advantage of providing a vast set of tools specifically designed for the implementation of e-assessment. Among these tools we emphasize the quizzes, which can encompass several types of questions, such as multiple-choice, true/false, item matching, short answer, among others.

Considering its purpose, assessment may be formative and/or summative, or diagnostic (Jacob et al., 2006; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Stödberg, 2012) (Jacob et al., 2006; Redecker & Johannessen, 2013; Stödberg, 2012). In relevant scientific studies about this topic, it was found that the use of formative evaluation or of both types, formative and summative simultaneously, is more common than the use of summative evaluation alone (Stödberg, 2012). E-assessment can be useful and can bring benefits to both types of assessment, formative and summative (Bull & Danson, 2001; McAlpine, 2002).Assessment can also be continuous. E-assessment “can provide a powerful means of continuous assessment, providing rapid and detailed feedback to students and academics about the learning process.” (McAlpine, 2002, p. 8).

Stödberg (2012) presents a study in which e-assessment task were classified in five categories namely: (i) closed questions, such as multiple-choice questions and matching, (ii) open-ended questions, (iii) portfolio, (iv) product, such as software, and (v) discussions between students.  There are applications of e-assessment in diverse areas such as geography (Holmes, 2015; Rod et al., 2010; Wilson, Boyd, Chen, & Jamal, 2011), management (Jacob et al., 2006), chemistry (Sorensen, 2013), medicine (Harris et al., 2015), engineering (Botički & Milašinović, 2008; Burrow et al., 2005; Jacob et al., 2006; Moscinska & Rutkowski, 2012) , and Mathematics (Acosta-Gonzaga & Walet, 2013; Blanco & Ginovart, 2012; Ferrão, 2010; Gruttmann, Böhm, & Kuchen, 2008; Hauk, Powers, & Segalla, 2015; Mathai & Olsen, 2013).

Historically, assessment in higher education consisted in the application of final exams for each of the courses, the so-called final assessment. In Europe, the Bologna process points out to another type of assessment, encompassing diverse forms of assessments carried out during the semester/academic year, the so-called continuous assessment. E-assessment plays an important paper in this context, and has nowadays a growing importance in Higher Education, not only in Europe, but around the world.

Objective:

The primary objective of this book is to provide insights concerning the use of e-assessment in Higher Education. This is a cutting-edge and important topic that deserves a reflexion, and this book is an excellent opportunity to do it. The book aims to provide the opportunity for a reflexion on this important issue, increasing the understanding of using e-assessment in the context of several different contexts, providing relevant academic work, empirical research findings, and an overview of this relevant field of study.

Target Audience:

All those that need to assess the teaching-learning process, namely teacher at all levels, from k1-k12 to college. Also professionals in the area of skills certification, managers, researchers, academicians, practitioners, and graduate students, are the target of this book.

Recommended Topics:

Traditional vs e-assessment  E-assessment with portfolios  E-assessment with multiple choice questions and other closed formats  Feedback and e-assessment  E-assessment for e-learning  Analitics and e-assessment  Adaptive systems and e-assessment  E-assessment hardware and software  E-assessment tools, applications, and portals  Other topics of interest

Submission Procedure:

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before July 15, 2017, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by July 25,2017 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by November 15, 2017, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions athttp://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.  Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Trust in Knowledge Management and Systems in Organizations. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager.

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2018.

Contact:

Propose a chapter for this book clicking here http://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/submit/2812

 

LLAMA Proposals ALA Annual New Orleans

LLAMA is now accepting program proposals for the 2018 ALA Annual Conference in New Orleans, June 21-26. Please note that beginning in 2018, all programs will be one-hour long.

To begin your online proposal, log into the ALA system by clicking on the link below. Anyone can submit a proposal, regardless of membership status.

When completing the proposal form, be sure to select the Library Leadership and Management Association to have your proposal reviewed by LLAMA.

Program Proposal Submission Site (login or create a new account to enter)

Submission Deadline: August 25, 2017

Additional information about submitting a proposal can be found using these links:

ALA Program Proposal Process Information

Program Submission Information Packet

Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions.

Cheers.

Fred

Fred Reuland
Program Officer, Continuing Education
Library Leadership and Management Association
A division of ALA
50 East Huron Street
Chicago, IL 60611
312-280-5032
freuland@ala.org 

2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium

Call for Poster Submissions:

The Greater New York Metropolitan Area Chapter of ACRL is soliciting poster proposals for its December 1st 2017 Symposium. The theme of this year’s symposium is exploring the mission of academic and research libraries in the 21st century information environment.

We are interested in case studies and concrete examples of ways in which the changing information landscape has and will continue to affect the mission of academic and research libraries.

Examples include, but are not limited to: ·       Information literacy, students, and crises of authority in the contemporary information world ·       The academic librarian as research advisor ·       Educating new librarians for the 21st century academic library mission ·       Challenges related to preservation, accessibility and discoverability of research-valuable information.

Selection will be done by a blind review; please do not include any identifying information in your abstract.

Proposals can be submitted athttps://acrlnyforms.wufoo.com/forms/z5jimza067i5kk/

Proposal deadline: Monday, September 4th.

The 2017 ACRL/NY Annual Symposium will be held on Friday, December 1st at the Baruch College (CUNY) Vertical Campus, 55 Lexington Ave, New York, NY 10010. Successful candidates will be notified by early October.

On the day of the Symposium, you will be expected to arrive by 8:30 am, set up by 9:00 am and stay through the end of the day (3:45 pm). Posters will be displayed on 5’x2’ tables and cannot be displayed on walls.

If you have questions about the poster selection process, please contact Maureen Clements at mclements2@mercy.edu