Tag Archives: Books

Mobile App Develepment in Libraries

Primary Research Group, https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.Primaryresearch.com&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C439b9351e97c4a15ff0708d693751594%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636858528416762512&sdata=t9uuib3QAJ1m7VbOZz4v%2B%2BeaH%2BxZp7lILagFEGYLmE4%3D&reserved=0, is seeking an author to write a monograph of approximately 10,000 words on academic library use of mobile apps, both vendor and library developed The monograph should include at least 6 interviews primarily with colleges and universities  (at least three of which should be research universities) averaging about 1,500 words each. In addition, the author might include results of a summary of a literature search or interviews with app private sector app publishers. Some of the issues that might be discussed are: use of vendor supplied apps, info literacy training in apps for students and faculty, measurement/assessment of app use,  breakdown of app use by application and platform, development and cost of library apps, staff training for app development, determination of app needs, and more.

This is a compensated assignment.  To apply to write this monograph please
send your resume to jmoses@primaryresearch.com.

Academic Plagiarism: Librarians’ solo and collaborative efforts to curb academic plagiarism

Introducing a new Call for Proposals (CfP):

 Working Title:

“Academic Plagiarism: Librarians’ solo and collaborative efforts to curb academic plagiarism”

 In consultation with Jessica Gribble, senior acquisitions editor with Libraries Unlimited / ABC-CLIO, Russell Michalak, MLIS and Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. are soliciting chapter proposals for this proposed edited collection. The general timeline we are proposing is a completed volume by January 2020 so you would have several months to work on your contribution. If you are interested in authoring a chapter, please complete this form by the end of the day on Friday, February 22, 2019: https://gbcir.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ebXDPRALjnJyDxb

Envisioning the Framework: A Graphic Guide to Information Literacy

Call for Chapter Proposals

We are seeking chapter proposals for a volume that has been accepted for publication by ACRL. The chapters will be peer reviewed and publication date is tentatively expected in Spring 2021.

 

Working Title: Envisioning the Framework: A Graphic Guide to Information Literacy

Editor: Jannette L. Finch, MLIS

Abstract submission deadline: February 28, 2019

Book description

Envisioning the Framework offers opportunities for librarians and designers to explore The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and its relationship with library data, including assessment, instruction, student learning outcomes, improvements in student learning over time, differences in instruction type, comparison of student level, and much more.

The Framework is a set of core ideas representing threshold concepts in information literacy. In Envisioning the Framework, the significance and implications of the Framework and other developments in information literacy are clarified through effective visualizations. Graphic representations of the Framework allow library professionals to easily share concepts with faculty from other disciplines, with library colleagues, and with students. Understanding the relationships between the Frames, student learning outcomes, and assignments within a multidisciplinary environment is enhanced when visualized graphically.

Although data visualization is a burgeoning field, visualizations of library-related themes and data are relatively scarce and ripe for exploration. Envisioning the Frameworkexplores visualizations of significant information literacy concepts in multiple chapters from experts in data visualization, library professionals, and information literacy practitioners.

Sample Chapters may include:

·         The Frames Visualized as a Whole

·         The Frames and Information Literacy

o   Visualizing the Frames in context with threshold concepts in other disciplines

o   Visualizing the Frames aligned with Learner Groups: First-Year experience; Learning Communities; the Metaliterate Learner, etc.

o   Visualizing the Frames and Information Literacy Instruction: Online and Face to Face; Subject-Specific and Introductory; Freshmen to Grad; Adult Learners, First Generation; Community Colleges; STEAM; Humanities; Students at Risk; etc.

·         The Frames and Assessment

o   Visualizing Student Learning over Time

o   Visualizing Information Literacy Efforts Across Multiple Universities

·         The Frames as Interactive 3D Models

 

Don’t see your topic/idea here? We encourage you to contact the editor atfinchj@cofc.edu to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Not necessary:

Definitions of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, definitions of data or information visualization, a history of data visualization, overviews of graphic design, lists of visualization tools. If you have something in this category you think is compelling and wish to be considered, please contact the editor.

Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: February 28, 2019

Notification/feedback regarding submission: March 15, 2019

First drafts due: August 15, 2019

Tentative publication date: Spring 2021

Submission Process

A short form with an attached Word document (.doc or .docx) is required for proposal submission. The Word document should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title
  • Names of all contributing authors & their respective institutions
  • Contact information for the primary author
  • Estimated final word count
  • A brief (250-500 word) description of your proposed chapter

Attach your chapter submission proposal to an email with the subject line: Chapter Proposal Submission_(PrimaryAuthor’sLastName)
And send to: finchj@cofc.edu

Proposals DUE: February 28, 2019

Questions?

Jannette L. Finch, Editor

843-670-3099

finchj@cofc.edu

Editor bio

Jannette Finch is a research and instruction librarian at the College of Charleston. She is interested in information design, effective teaching through experiential learning activities, constructivist techniques in the teaching and learning environment, adult learners, visualizing data, the library role in the scholarly community, assessment and planning. She is the primary author of two peer-reviewed articles featuring data visualization and co-author of six book chapters in the Publications in Librarianship series, Framing Information Literacy.

Leveraging Technology for the Improvement of School Safety and Student Wellbeing

Proposal Submission Deadline: February 12, 2019

A book edited by Dr. Stephanie Huffman, Dr. Stacey Loyless, Dr. Shelly Allbritton, and Dr. Charlotte Green (University of Central Arkansas)

Introduction
Technology permeates all aspects of today’s school systems. An Internet search on technology in schools can generate millions of website results. The vast majority of these websites (well over 8,000,000 results for one simple search) focuses on advice, activities, and uses of technology in the classroom. Clearly teaching and learning with technology dominates the literature and conversations on how technology should or could be used in classroom settings. A search on school safety and technology can produce more than 3,000,000 results with many addressing technological tools such as video cameras, entry control devices, weapon detectors, and other such hardware. However, in recent times, cyberbullying appears to dominate the Internet conversations in references to school safety. With an increase in school violence in the past two decades, school safety is a fundamental concern in our nation’s schools. Policy makers, educators, parents, and students are seeking answers in how best to protect the physical, emotional, and social well-being of all children.

 

Objective of the Book
The proposed edited book covers the primary topic of P-12 school safety and the use of technology and technology used for fostering an environment in which all students can be academically successful and thrive as global citizens.  School safety is defined as the physical, social, and emotional well-being of children. The book will comprise empirical, conceptual and case based (practical application) research that craft an overall understanding of the issues in creating a “safe” learning environment and the role technology can and should play; where a student’s well-being is valued and protected from external and internal entities, equitable access is treasured as a means for facilitating the growth of the whole student, and policy, practices, and procedures are implemented to build a foundation to transform the culture and climate of the school into an inclusive nurturing environment.

Target Audience
The target audience is leadership and education scholars, leadership practitioners, and technology coordinators.  This book will be used as a collective body of work for the improvement of K-12 schools and as a tool for improving leadership and teacher preparation programs. School safety is a major concern for educators.  Technology has played a role in creating unsafe environments for children; however it also is an avenue for addressing the challenges of school safety

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Section I – Digital Leadership

  • Technology as a Climate and Cultural Transformation Tool
    • School Leadership in the Digital Age: Building a Shared Vision for all Aspects of Learning and Teaching
  • Ensuring Equity within a “One to One” Technology Framework
    • Infrastructure within Communities
    • Accessible WiFi for Low SES Students
    • Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy
  • Professional Development for School Leaders

Section II – Well Being

  • Social Media and School Safety: Inputs and Outputs
    • Tip lines: Crime, Bullying, Threats
    • Communication and Transparency
    • Platform for Social Justice
  • Teaching Strategies to Promote Healthy Student Interactions in Cyberspace (Digital Citizenship?)
    • Building Capacity and Efficacy, Platform to lower incidence of Cyber-Bullying, Boosting Instructional Engagement
  • Literacy and Preparedness for the Influence and Consequence of Digital Media Marketing Campaigns directed toward Children, Adolescents, and Teens.
  • Pioneering Innovative Technology Program in Curriculum: Fostering “Belonging” beyond Athletics & Arts.

Section III- Infrastructure Safety

  • Campus/Facility Safety and Security
    • Rural Schools vs. Urban Schools
    • Digital A/V Systems
    • Background Check – Visitor Registration (i.e. Raptor)
  • Network Security Systems and Protocols
    • User Filtering and Monitoring
    • Firewalls
  • Policy
    • Appropriate use policies
    • Digital Citizenship
    • Web development policy
    • Privacy
    • Intellectual Property & Copyright

Section IV – Academic Success

  • Professional Development for Classroom Teachers
    • Pedagogical Integration of Technology
    • Instructional Coaching for Student Engagement
    • Increase Rigor with Technology
    • Competence in the Blended/Hybrid/Flipped Classroom
  • Technology to enhance learning for all
    • Assistive Technology
    • Accessibility issues
    • Internet access for Low SES Students in the Blended/Hybrid/Flipped Classroom
  • Personal Learning Design
    • Differentiation for Student Efficacy
    • Strategies for Increasing Depth of Knowledge
    • Design Qualities for Enhanced Engagement

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before February 12, 2019, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the purpose, methodology, and a brief summary findings of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by March 12, 2019 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by June 12, 2019, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. See Edited Chapter Template. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Leveraging Technology for the Improvement of School Safety and Student Wellbeing. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager. USE THE FOLLOWING LINK TO SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL.  https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/3709

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates
February 12, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline
March 12, 2019: Notification of Acceptance
June 12, 2019: Full Chapter Submission
August 10, 2019: Review Results Returned
August 10, 2019: Final Acceptance Notification
September 7, 2019: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries can be forwarded to
Dr. Stephanie Huffman
University of Central Arkansas
steph@uca.edu or 501-450-5430

EDUCATION, SOCIETY, & REFORM CONFERENCE

28-29 JUNE 2019, ANKARA

For more information go to: http://www.edusref.org/

Education, Society & Reform Research (EDUSREF-2019) is an International Conference that aims to bridge the knowledge gap, promote social research esteem, and produce democratic information for potential education reforms.

Main Theme of the Conference is

“Questioning of Changes in Education: Looking for Priorities in Education”

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15 April 2019

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 22 May 2019

 

Conference Dates: 28 and 29 June 2019

 

Full Paper Submission Deadline: 15 September 2019

 

(After the conference, the interested presenters may submit their fulltext to Education Reform Journal on www.erjournal.org for possible evaluation.

 

Also the presenters who want to publish their papers in the e-book may send it edusref@outlook.com)

 

Conference Topics

Paper topics may include, but are not limited, to the following:

 

  • Educational Policies and Practices
  • Trends and Challenges Shaping Education
  • Large-Scale Assessments in Education (PISA, TALIS, PIACC etc.)
  • Economic Challenges (i.e. BREXIT) and its Reflections on Education Systems
  • International Benchmarking /Indicators
  • Comparative Studies in education
  • Social Transitions & School Culture and Climate
  • Socio-Psychological Analyses for Education
  • Social Media and its Reflections on Schools
  • Migration and Education Studies
  • Gender and Education Studies
  • Inclusive Education
  • School Improvement
  • Creativity and Innovation in Education
  • Innovative Learning Environments
  • Curriculum Critiques
  • School Leadership
  • Performance Appraisal in Education
  • Law of Education
  • Professional Development
  • Teacher Education
  • Developing Higher Education Systems

 

In order to make the productions of the conference efficient, the authors are expected to answer this question “What are the implications based on the results of study for potential education reforms? “ in the conclusion remarks in their study.

 

Conference Secretary

 

e-mail: edusref@outlook.com

 

 

Intersections Across Disciplines: Interdisciplinarity and Learning Design

 2019 AECT  Summer Research Symposium

Call for Proposal 

For more information go to: https://www.aect.org/2019_research_symposium_call.php

The 2019 Association for Educational Communication and Technology (AECT) Summer Research Symposium is soliciting research-supported papers for a symposium on Interdisciplinarity and learning design. It will be held in Bloomington, Indiana, July 17-18, 2019 in conjunction with the regular AECT Summer Leadership Meetings. The resulting book will be published by Springer. This year, all AECT journals, including ETR&D and TechTrends will have editors or representatives participate, recruit future reviewers and solicit articles for possible publication.

We seek to examine how learning and the design of instruction is interdisciplinary and connective both in terms of research and practice. This framework will shape our interactions, our discussions, and the informal context of the symposium. Proposals are solicited on multiple levels including research and practice on learning across disciplines, including instructional design and how design thinking is inherently interdisciplinary. How learning is designed for general audiences or for purposely integrated educational experiences may also be examined.

We expect an interesting range of contributions, from traditional research studies to design cases and opinion pieces supported by literature and/or practice. Examples and experiences from outside the traditional boundaries of instructional design and educational technology will also enrich the discussion.

The Symposium will begin the morning of July 17, 2019 and end on July 18, 2019 at the end of the day. It is the goal of the symposium to gather together a select group of scholars to share research for real dialogue and deep discussions about learning experience and learning design. Using Art of Hosting techniques for engaged conversation, we will have very intense and deep discussions of each proposed chapter. Social and recreation events will be developed to engage the participants more fully with the topic of design; non-electronic work periods will used to examine the field from different view-points. The conference fee (with some included meals) is expected to be around $180. Proposals of 750-1000 words will be accepted through March 15, 2019. To submit a proposal go to https://members.aect.org/events/symposia/call/login.asp

Should a proposal be accepted, the author will be asked to commit to:

  • Strictly adhering to the presentation and discussion guidelines for the symposium.
  • Advancing the initial proposal into a 2500 word draft suitable for discussion by June 1, 2019. Failure to provide the full draft paper by June 1, 2019 may result in a rescinding of the proposal acceptance.
  • Commit to reading most of the accepted papers from other presenters prior to attending the symposium. Attendees with be given access to all of the presenters’ papers after June 1, 2019.
  • Attend the full symposium (including all sessions and workshops) and actively participate in all collaborative and/or group activities.
  • Based on feedback and collaboration from symposium attendees, make adjustments to your initial draft and resubmit a draft for review by other chapter authors by September 15, 2019; to review other chapters, comment, and to submit a final draft by December 1, 2019.
  • Review authors proofs in a timely manner in preparation for publication in an upcoming Springer Press symposium book with an anticipated publication date of October, 2020.

Schedule:
March 15, 2019: Abstracts due: 1000 word max.
April 15, 2019: Chapters selected
June 1, 2019: Selected Chapters Due
July 17-18: 2019 Symposium
Further Information:
Brad Hokanson, Ph.D.
College of Design, University of Minnesota
brad@umn.edu

 

 

How Old is Too Old? Narratives about Becoming a Parent after 40

Dottir Press
How Old is Too Old?
Narratives about Becoming a Parent after 40
Co-editors: Vicki Breitbart and Nan Bauer-Maglin

We are seeking personal narratives that explore the realities of becoming and being a parent after the age of 40. There are many reasons why people are getting pregnant later or adopting children when they are over 40. With new definitions of marriage and family and an increase in reproductive technologies becoming a parent is a possibility for many more individuals over 40. While this group of parents is a growing phenomenon, the stigma against becoming a parent over 40, still exists.

We are looking for a range of proposals with topics that challenge the notions about who should become a parent and at what time in our lives. This book will be a collection of narratives written by those who have lived the experience. Their stories will highlight how the issue of age affects our opportunities to parent; some will add the discrimination felt due to race, class and sexual orientation to an already difficult situation. The stories will challenge gender roles, will confront the U.S. culture’s concepts about aging and the inequities about health care and opportunities for successful parenting.

All the narratives will be based on the life experiences of people who have faced some aspect of becoming an older parent, raising a child as an older parent, being in a relationship with a partner beginning parenting over 40, being raised by an older parent, or providing health care or services to people who want to be parents later in life.

We are interested in a variety of genres and approaches (dialogues, interviews, memoir, poetry, for example) and tones (serious to comic). They should be written in an accessible voice. We are committed to using gender-inclusive language in this collection by using words such as pregnant “person” or “older parent” when appropriate.

Please send us both a one-to-two-page description of what you are interested in writing by January 15. Include a few sentences about your previous writings and/or work. Please forward this call to friends and colleagues.

Vicki Breitbart vbreitbart@gmail.com   Nan Bauer-Maglin nan.bauermaglin99@ret.gc.cuny.edu

Feminist Collaborations: Intersectional and Transnational Teaching & Learning

Co-editors Isis Nusair and Barbara Shaw are soliciting abstracts for
inclusion in an anthology that focuses on feminist collaborations and the
radical interconnectedness between pedagogy, theory and practice. We seek
cutting edge work that scholars-teachers-activists are engaging with that
goes beyond valuing collaboration abstractly to engaging it and linking
theory to practice in building feminist/women’s/gender/ LGBTQ+ communities.
This project emerges out of three women’s, gender & sexuality curriculum
institutes funded through the Great Lakes College Association (GLCA) and in
which contributors drew on and returned to the work of Richa Nagar,
AnaLouise Keating, Chandra Mohanty, Jacquie Alexander, Ann Russo, and
others to think through feminist-queer collaborations and pedagogies. Our
call for abstracts invites scholars-educators-activists broadly to focus on
the connection between theory and practice in the process of teaching and
learning, and how to develop strategies for doing collaborative work in an
expansive field of study within and across institutional boundaries. The
aim of the anthology is to fill a vacuum in pedagogy especially on how to
teach intersectionality and transnationalism. It will focus on theorizing
pedagogical approaches and providing resources (media and visuals, syllabi
and assignments) for teaching introductory, theory & method, capstone and
special topics courses in an expanding field. This will help in faculty
development and building local, regional, and transnational connections
that imagine its purpose beyond institutionalization and actively
contributes to socio-political change.

Please send 250-300 word abstracts to Barbara Shaw ( bshaw@allegheny.edu )
and Isis Nusair ( nusairi@denison.edu ) by December 20, 2018. Further
inquiries are welcome. Publishers have expressed interest in the volume and
we will be crafting the book proposal based on selected abstracts.

Practical Guides for Librarians series

Hi Everyone,

I’m writing because I’m starting to get ready for another set of books for the
Practical Guides for Librarians series from Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
I’m looking for authors and book ideas for next year’s books!!!  I’m hoping to
do 10 books in these main areas of interest – technology, makerspaces, and
young adult topics.

If you think you might be interested in writing a book for the series – yes
there are royalties involved!! – please briefly pitch me your idea  on the
linked form.  It doesn’t have to be a full proposal – just a sentence or two
with your idea.

Here’s the full call for participation, please check out the books we’ve
already done at:
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Frowman.com%2FAction%2FSERIES%2FRL%2FRLPGL%2FThe-Practical-Guides-for-Librarians&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C218df50aaf8c4017d19a08d63abb6966%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636760973935335414&sdata=k%2BHd35BCjQqigbldmuV%2BxvPw9em8cxOnqxl2x%2B8lHis%3D&reserved=0
so you don’t pitch those same ideas!:

https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fellyssa.wufoo.com%2Fforms%2Fs1agh5mz1juejb7%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C218df50aaf8c4017d19a08d63abb6966%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636760973935345427&sdata=JelUrIkwqPYAYI%2BmbLFvoZN47lCIi1TLrjqpzKpTB1I%3D&reserved=0

Best,

Ellyssa

________________________

Ellyssa Kroski
Writer/Librarian/Instructor/Speaker
ellyssakroski@yahoo.com
https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Famazon.com%2Fauthor%2Fellyssa&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C218df50aaf8c4017d19a08d63abb6966%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636760973935345427&sdata=PTU81JB4omgItmMraMilncPwNpASIVztFP2pQ5hUmog%3D&reserved=0

Homeschooling and Libraries

Deadline Oct. 30 for Topics

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland, 2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor. Library’s Role in Supporting Financial Literacy for Patrons (Rowman& Littlefield, 2016); public library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters (3,000-5,000 words) sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of specific programs, projects, aspects, and angles of the library role and impact on homeschooling process, families, and students, within the library walls and beyond. We are also looking for ideas (whether implemented or not) that can serve as a basis, a foundation, to incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. A tentative Table of Contents can be provided per request.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors per chapter. Compensation: one complimentary copy per 3,000-5,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one or two chapters by the same author(s); author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary or brief outline of the main talking points by October 30, 2018, with brief bio on each author; place HOM, Your Name, on subject line to gubnitv11@gmail.com