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Handbook of Research on Challenges and Opportunities in Launching a Technology-Driven International University

Call for Chapters

Propose a Chapter

IMPORTANT DATES

November 30, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline

December 13, 2017: Notification of Acceptance

January 30, 2018: Full Chapter Submission

March 30, 2018: Review Results Returned

April 30, 2018: Revised Chapter Submission

May 15, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification

May 30, 2018: Submission of Final Chapters

Editors

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., Information Resources Management Association (IRMA), USA

Introduction 
The global digital economy is rapidly increasing the demand for educated, highly trained and globally focused professionals. Launching accessible technology-driven higher learning institutions that offer a transformational educational and research experience can effectively prepare future leaders with the knowledge resources and tools they need to meet the demands of the 21st century. Launching any academic and/or research-based institution can be a challenge. There are various struggles involved in creating a robust curriculum and recruiting top-rated faculty from across the globe; while also meeting the critical facility approval and accreditation criteria to offer sound and effective academic programs and degrees to culturally diverse students from all over the world.

 

Objective 
The aim of this comprehensive publication is to offer both empirical and theoretical research focused on the effective construction of technology-driven higher learning international universities.  Themes such as: developing an accelerated and innovative curriculum, the recruitment and retention of internationally renowned faculty and researchers to lead courses, as well as the development of an on-campus and distance learning system will be presented. Also, taking into consideration the financial and economic impacts of launching a university – specifically, how to identify the appropriate locale for universities and/or branch campuses, which will ideally complement the local interest of business sectors within the selected location.

 

The goal of every university should be to create a transformative impact on society through continual innovation in education, research, and entrepreneurship. Also, creating a direct connection between education and workforce development; offering programs that are designed to align with and exceed standard models and that focus on deep disciplinary knowledge, critical thinking and problem solving, leadership, communication, professional development, and interpersonal skills. Overall, assisting students with realizing their educational goals by integrating core values such as: educational excellence, student-centered course development, lifelong learning, a respectful environment, flexible learning, diversity, global leadership, research contributions, entrepreneurship, partnership, excellent service, and of course the highest quality.

Target Audience 
Entrepreneurs, practitioners, academicians, instructional designers, administrators, government officials, and independent researchers and consultants focused on digital research and scholarship, educational leadership and administration, educational marketing, educational policy, course management, instructional design, educational theory and practice, human resources in educational settings, and curriculum design.

Recommended Topics:

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Administration and faculty recruitment
  • International student recruiting programs
  • Curriculum development
  • Online learning management systems
  • Synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching
  • Blended learning programs
  • Student services for online programs
  • Online faculty professional development
  • Online education and job placement programs
  • Online programs and business partnerships
  • Licensing and accreditation processes
  • Selecting an optimal location
  • Technical considerations in facility development
  • Educational marketing techniques
  • Student retention programs
  • Putting together a business proposal and plan
  • Funding and budgeting programs and processes
  • Complementing the local business economic interests
  • Financial and economic impacts on local economy
  • Environmental sensitivity and considerations
  • Selection and design of a course delivery system
  • Design and management of technology infrastructure
  • Leadership and management of the institution
  • Managing operational aspects of the institution

 

Submission Procedure:

Authors are invited to submit a brief chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by November 30, 2017. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by no later than December 13, 2017 about the status of their proposals and will receive chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by January 30, 2018. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind basis. Contributors may also be requested to be engaged as reviewers for this project.

Language:
Submissions will be made in English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language paper submission may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English will use editing/proofreading services on their own. IGI Global recommends eContent Pro® Copy Editing Services.

 

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released as part of the 2019 copyright year.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this publication. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.

Inquiries:

Inquiries may be directed to:
Ms. Courtney Tychinski, Managing Editor – Acquisitions and Development

ctychinski@igi-global.com

Propose a Chapter

ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice)

The ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Committee invites you to submit a preliminary proposal for its CLIPP publication series. We welcome proposals on any topic that is relevant for small and mid-sized academic libraries. The CLIPP series allows library staff to share information on practices and procedures they have implemented to address common issues or concerns. Each CLIPP follows a set structure of three parts (literature review, survey results, and sample documents), and should both describe library best practices and provide useful, specific examples that libraries can refer to when developing similar policies and procedures of their own.

Authors of a CLIPP publication are aided throughout by the CLIPP Committee and an assigned editor. CLIPP authors receive 10% of the royalties on the net revenues from their publication. For your reference, please find author instructions and more information about the CLIPP program at http://bit.ly/2bjTTDP.

CLIPP proposals are accepted throughout the year. The next Preliminary Proposal Deadline is December 15, 2017. The CLIPP Committee will send out notifications regarding this round of submissions by January 17, 2018.

For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact:

Mary Francis

CLIPP Committee Chair

Email: mary.francis@dsu.edu

Unruly Catholic Women Volume 4

Call for Submissions (extended): Third- and Fourth-Wave Catholic Women Writers: The Future of Unruly Women in the Catholic Church.  Jeana DelRosso, Leigh Eicke, and Ana Kothe seek contributions for the fourth volume in their Unruly Catholic Women series.  In this volume, we seek creative pieces by third- and fourth-wave feminists on Roman Catholicism, with an eye to the future of the Catholic Church.  Please submit autobiographical stories, fictional pieces, prose, or poems tojdelrosso@ndm.edu AND anam.kothe@upr.edu by 17 December 2017, for consideration.  All submissions must be in English.

Dr. Jeana DelRosso
Professor of English and Women’s Studies
Director of the Morrissy Honors Program
Notre Dame of Maryland University
4701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD  21210
jdelrosso@ndm.edu

Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland,
2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017); public
library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special
librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals
will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of
aspects and angles of the library profession as a creative endeavor, within the library
walls and beyond. We are looking for ideas that can serve as a foundation, to
incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well
as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. The focus is on library staff
professional and personal growth and development, NOT creative programming and
services for patrons.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors
per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary
copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one
or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in
order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by November
30, 2017, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on subject line to
gubnitv11@gmail.com

The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Call for Chapters:

Working Title: The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Editors: Darren Chase & Dana Haugh

Submission Deadline: December 1st

Publisher: ALA Editions


Book Description

This peer-reviewed collection will bring together a dynamic set of librarians, scholars, practitioners, policy makers and thinkers in order to take measure of the open access movement. Critical essays, research, case studies and other pieces will create a substantial, far-reaching text.  This collection will be critical and practical, and provide practical examples and theory in understanding the open access movement, open data, open educational resources, open knowledge, and the opportunity for an open and transformed world.


More and more universities–often spearheaded by university libraries–are adopting open access policies as a practical way to promote open access and further the research enterprise, while countering the often closed, restrictive and costly scholarly journals and databases.  This book will provide a substantial and practical overview of the open access movement, along with critical essays and consideration of the meaning of open access and its potential to leverage existing technology to transform how we support, share and access research.


We are looking for case studies, research, and critical essays on various aspects of open access scholarship, including:


  • Library Open Access Initiatives (implementations, challenges, processes, training, promotion/outreach, etc.)

  • Open Access Publishers & Journals (reception, evaluation measures, predatory publishers)

  • Repositories (green open access, university-specific, network of open repositories, discipline-specific platforms)

  • Open Educational Resources (current landscape, value/usage, challenges)

  • Open Data (data repositories, linked data, metadata, research data management)

  • Publishing Models (gold open access, new models, university presses, peer-review etc)

  • Research consortia, governmental & NGO initiatives

  • Public access to publically-funded research

  • University policies on open access (issues of mandatory vs. voluntary, on-boarding faculty/staff, creating buy-in, etc.)

  • Future of open access

  • Other areas of open scholarship


Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: December 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 15, 2017


Submissions

Please use this form to submit abstracts of 200-500 words.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter relates to open scholarship. Multiple submissions are welcome. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 3,000-5,000 word range (some exceptions will be made for longer chapters). Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Please direct any questions to Darren Chase (darren.chase@stonybrook.edu) or Dana Haugh (dana.haugh@stonybrook.edu)


About the editors

Darren Chase is Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University.  His research interests include open access, crowdfunded research, online learning, digital badging and information literacy. Darren has written and presented widely on myriad scholarly publishing topics.  He spearheaded the development and eventual adoption of the Stony Brook University Open Access Policy, and coordinates the annual Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium.


Dana Haugh is Web Services Librarian at Stony Brook University Libraries where she leads the design and development of the library’s web presences. Her research interests include web design, open access, marketing & outreach in libraries, and information literacy. Dana has extensive experience writing for top journals and monographs in the library field. She’s particularly focused on ensuring scholarship is openly accessible and helps manage her university’s institutional repository which promotes open access to scholarship published by Stony Brook University faculty.

Craft as Political Activism in a Nation Divided

CALL FOR CHAPTER CONTRIBUTORS

The day after Donald J. Trump was sworn into office as the 45th president
of the United States of America, bright pink yarn quite literally painted
the streets pink as women, and male allies participated, in what was likely
“the largest single-day demonstration in recorded U.S. history.” Protests
of the new president’s divisive rhetoric and proposed policies, and his
history of sexual harassment and assault, may have been at the forefront of
the women’s marches all over the world but knit and crochet hats helped
convey the message: Women would not sit quietly as concern over their
rights and bodies were amplified during the 2016 presidential election and
beyond.

This proposed volume, an edited collection, is committed to investigating
how people create handicrafts and share them publicly as a statement
reacting to political policies. At the heart of this volume is an
exploration of craft as action and a means of expression relating to
unfolding current events throughout U.S. history. Craft activism “marries”
a DIY, grassroots makers’ ethic with commemorative culture to reveal a
unique relationship that is democratic, visual and rooted in the desire for
social change.

This proposed collection will feature essays that explore how craft has
become a tool – a medium in both the artistic and communication sense – of
the Resistance movement as a platform to express dissent and to build
community among committed activists and those entering activist circles for
the first time following the election of Donald J. Trump. This volume is
also committed to exploring the role craft has played in other resistance
movements and periods of unrest in the U.S.

Chapters that make linkages between craft activism and social justice
movements throughout history, and that explore issues of race and gender,
will be especially welcome.

This volume is also particularly interested in ways that museums, history
and arts organizations can leverage contemporary craft activism as a tool
for community engagement.

Potential essays can explore:

·      Craft and activism efforts as a response to, or in opposition of,
U.S. government policies

·      Craft as a political-action tool during the presidency of Donald J.
Trump

·      Political histories of craft during various social-justice movements
in U.S. history

·      An investigation/exploration of how craft disrupts political power
throughout U.S. history, or at specific points in U.S. history or
contemporarily

·      How the gendered nature of craft allows for subversive work and
interpretations of craft objects and craft movements

·      Racial histories of craft in social justice movements

·      How museums, history organizations and arts organizations can use
crowd-sourced and community-based craft projects to engage with the public
and showcase their work around particular topics

·      How social media platforms cultivate a community and safe space for
craftivists – who don’t know each other IRL – engaging in work throughout
the U.S. and abroad

·      Hashtag Craftivism as consciousness raising activities

·      How media coverage presents a gendered depiction of the current
craft “craze” as “not your grandma’s knitting circle”

·      Examples of post-pussy-hat craft projects in localized settings

·      Examples of craft and action as tools that solve social problems or
raise awareness about these efforts

·      Conversations with people leading and engaged with the Craftivist
movement today

·      Examples of Craftivist action in the U.S. connecting to themes of
women’s rights, immigration, health care, disability rights, among others.

·      Exploration of the constructed ‘whiteness’ of craft through images
of white knitting circles and white grandmas engaged in craft

·      Contemporary efforts by the Yarn Mission – “knits for black
liberation” – to “center Black Folks” through yarn work

*Format: *Potential chapters can include scholarly studies, first-person
essays, magazine-style features and photo essays. The book’s editor
welcomes contributions from academics, activists, essayists and those in
engaged in craft-centric activism.

*Deadline:* Please email Hinda Mandell, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School
of Communication, RIT (hbmgpt@rit.edu) by Nov. 30 expressing an interest in
contributing a chapter. Submissions indicating interest past this date will
be considered but early submissions of interest are most welcome.
Submissions indicating interest should include a chapter title, a 200-word
(approximately) chapter abstract and an author bio. Questions are welcome
at any time and should be directed to Hinda Mandell. All scholarship and
submissions should be previously unpublished and not under consideration
elsewhere.

Onboarding 2.0: Methods of Designing and Deploying Effective Onboarding Training for Academic Libraries

We would like to invite you to submit your proposal for an edited volume on “Onboarding 2.0: Methods of Designing and Deploying Effective Onboarding Training for Academic Libraries” to be published by Nova Science Publishers.
Interested scholars should submit a chapter proposal form by October 31, 2017 by visiting
http://secure-web.cisco.com/14-iL_fET3zr46HT5sclBoQEoSK5M3VOC6T2qL5Mi3Ra9PpzVSDaXSVwnqziix3tqVXiuvlm8GCa0q-PMv1zWXnQzXHbd7GfUneRsu_IJiilDtwPboCyHJbRFMFwPE-rKjpG68qS4bvGIP9WnLszPZ9X_7RIC2lGxsmVM9rkkq6VWiRl9LDj03AMWoJxOriLT/http%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2FOnboarding-Call-for-Proposals. This form requests the following information: primary contact’s name, primary contact’s email address, primary contact’s institution, tentative title, other co-author(s) names and institutions (if applicable), five keywords, and chapter abstract (max. 300 words; uploaded as a Microsoft Word document). Early submissions are encouraged. All submissions will undergo a rigorous double-blind peer review. The reviewers will recommend full submissions from among the proposals.
The proposal should be a previously unpublished work. Upon acceptance of the chapter proposal, the final chapter should be completed not later than April 1, 2018. Contributions will be blind reviewed and returned with comments by June 1, 2018. Finalized chapters are due no later than July 1, 2018. The final contributions should not exceed 20 double spaced manuscript pages (7,000 words). Guidelines for preparing chapters will be sent to authors upon acceptance of the proposal.
Introduction
Onboarding is defined as the “process of process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating and accelerating new team members, whether they come from outside or inside the organization. The prerequisite to successful onboarding is getting your organization aligned around the need and the role” (Onboarding is defined as the “process of process of acquiring, accommodating, assimilating and accelerating new team members, whether they come from outside or inside the organization. The prerequisite to successful onboarding is getting your organization aligned around the need and the role” (HR.com). This edited book provides a comprehensive overview of onboarding library staff, paraprofessionals, and student workers in academic libraries.
Coverage
1. Review of Literature regarding onboarding and libraries
2. Face-to-Face Onboarding Initiatives (could include case studies)
3. Hybrid Onboarding initiatives (could include case studies)
4. Online Onboarding initiatives (could include case studies)
5. Designing Hybrid/Online Onboarding Training
6. Utilizing Learning Analytics
Proposed Timeline
The following represents a timeline for completing the edited volume:
October 31, 2017 – Proposal due including title, abstract, keywords
December 1, 2017 – Notification and additional information for accepted authors
April 1, 2018 – Draft Chapters due
June 1, 2018 – Chapters returned with reviewers’ comments
July 1, 2018 – Final Chapters due
September 2018 – Manuscript due to Nova Science Publishers
Inquiries
Please forward your inquiries to
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D.
Director – Office of Institutional Research & Training
Goldey-Beacom College

Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Call for chapter proposals

Working Title: Comics and Critical Librarianship for Academic Libraries

Editors: Olivia Miller & Stephanie Grimm

Submission Deadline: December 15, 2017

Publisher: Library Juice Press

Book description

This book will be a collection of chapters on ways comics have been used in the practice of critical librarianship. The intended audiences for this book are librarians and library workers that currently or hope to work with comics in academic libraries, people interested in critical librarianship, and comics scholars. The purpose of this book is to add to the conversation of critical librarianship within academic libraries by highlighting the use and focus of an already radical medium (comics) by librarians and library workers who practice critical librarianship.

For the purposes of this book, we use the term “comics” to mean any work in the medium of comics/sequential art. This can mean comic book issues, graphic novels, comic strips, webcomics, minicomics, etc.

We want both critical librarianship and comics to be approachable and accessible topics to our readers. One way we aim to do this is through approachable language much in the way that Maria T. Accardi did in Feminist Pedagogy for Library Instruction.

Possible topics

Possible topic areas include but are not limited to the following:

  • Critical considerations of:
    • comics in academic library exhibitions or programming
    • comics in library instruction in higher education contexts
    • cataloging practices in relation to comics
    • acquisition or collection management/organization practices for comics and comics collections
    • comics or comics ephemera in special collections, archives, or manuscript collections
  • Case studies on the critical use of comics in academic libraries and special collections
  • Theoretical or research-based considerations of comics as a tool and site for critical librarianship
  • Other relevant considerations of the topic

Timeline

 

  • Abstract submission deadline: December 15, 2017
  • Notification/Feedback regarding submission: January 31, 2018
  • First drafts due: June 15, 2018
  • Final drafts due: October 15, 2018
  • Final manuscript due to publisher: December 2018

 

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter discusses using comics in critical librarianship. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss comics being used in critical librarianship practices in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Olivia Miller and Stephanie Grimm, editors, at critlibcomics (at) gmail (dot) com.

 

 

About the Editors

 

Olivia Miller (she/her) is the Arts & Humanities Librarian at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. Her BA is in Art History and English from the University of North Carolina Greensboro and she attended the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill for her MSLS. She built a strong graphic novel collection in her last position at Greensboro College and taught a for-credit course for two semesters on how to read and find comics with a feminist pedagogy.

 

Stephanie Grimm (she/her) is the Art and Art History Librarian at George Mason University in Fairfax, VA. She holds a BFA in Illustration and earned her MSI from the University of Michigan, where she developed a dedicated minicomics collection within the university libraries. She has worked with comics and illustration students at both art & design schools and research universities, and is a proponent of critical librarianship and literacy for artists and design students.

ALA Book Call for Chapters: Managing Your Libraries’ Organizational Knowledge

We are accepting chapter proposals for an upcoming book published by ALA Editions, Managing Your Libraries’ Organizational Knowledge.  We welcome proposals from librarians, faculty, and administrators working at academic and public libraries in the United States and Canada.

Theme of the Book

For this book, knowledge management (KM) refers to intentional implementation of a plan where unique human knowledge from employees is captured, leveraged, and preserved to provide long-term operational benefits to an organization. KM theory and practice is an expanding area of interest in many academic and large public libraries. Although librarians and information professionals are well versed at providing resources to their external users, the management of knowledge created within their organizations can be a challenge. Identifying, preserving, and disseminating internal intellectual and experiential knowledge is important for library and information organization management because it saves time, money, and duplicated effort. This book provides 1) an introduction of basic KM theory as it applies to information organizations, including definitions and history of the field; 2) a literature review of key articles, books, and other resources in KM and; 3) targeted, real life case studies of KM applications in academic and public libraries.

Proposals for chapter-length case studies are welcomed on any KM projects from academic and public libraries in the United States and Canada. We especially welcome proposals from large institutions with demonstrated organizational challenges of managing internal information and knowledge that have implemented thought-provoking, innovating, and successful solutions.

Details

Proposals should include the names of all intended authors and institutional affiliations, identification of primary contact with e-mail address, proposed title of chapter, and an abstract of no more than 500 words. Proposals should be submitted to both book editors, Jennifer Bartlett and Spencer Acadia, by e-mail on or before October 15, 2017.

Authors of accepted proposals will be asked to write a chapter within the range of 12-15 pages, double-spaced, including all text, references, tables, images, and photographs. Each chapter must address the following points:

  1. Describe your library and its larger institutional setting.
  2. Describe your organization’s knowledge management need. What is the purpose and focus of your KM project? How have you integrated theoretical or methodological concepts to better inform your project?
  3. What resources were required for the project, including human resources, financial resources, and technological resources? How and why were they sufficient or not?
  4. In your view, was the project successful, and why or why not? What have been its challenges and how were those overcome?
  5. What are the implications of the project to other academic, public, or other libraries? What is the applicability of the project outside of your institution?

Timeline

  • October 15, 2017: Chapter proposals due to editors
  • November 3, 2017: Authors notified of acceptance
  • February 2, 2018: Chapter drafts due to editors
  • March 2, 2018: Editors’ comments provided to authors
  • April 13, 2018: Revised drafts due to editors

We look forward to reading your submissions. If you have questions, please contact us.

Jennifer Bartlett, Editor

jenniferbartlett33@gmail.com

Spencer Acadia, Editor

acadias1@gmail.com

About the Editors

  • Jennifer Bartlett is an assistant professor and the Interim Associate Dean for Teaching, Learning, and Research at the University of Kentucky Libraries. She has worked in academic and public libraries for over 20 years and focuses on public services, access services, and academic library management and administration. Since 2011, she has authored the “New and Noteworthy” column in Library Leadership and Management, the journal of ALA’s Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA). She is also a member of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) Knowledge Management Standing Committee. Jen can be reached at bartlett33@gmail.com.
  • Spencer Acadia is the Social Sciences Librarian at the University of Kentucky Libraries and has worked in academic libraries for ten years. He has published peer-reviewed and professional articles and chapters—several on knowledge management—for such publishers as ALA, Elsevier, Taylor & Francis, Gale, and de Gruyter Saur. He is a standing committee member in the knowledge management section of the International Federation of Library Organizations (IFLA), and is an active member in the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) and the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST). He has been active in conferencing by presenting papers and posters at ACRL and IFLA, as well as chairing an IFLA pre-conference on knowledge management. In addition to an MLS, he holds a PhD in sociology and a master’s degree in psychology. Spencer can be reached at acadias1@gmail.com.

 

Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership

As a follow up to our recently published edited collection, Surviving Sexism in Academia: Strategies for Feminist Leadership<https://www.routledge.com/Surviving-Sexism-in-Academia-Feminist-Strategies-for-Leadership/Cole-Hassel/p/book/9781138696846>, Kirsti Cole and Holly Hassel are soliciting proposals for an edited collection, Effecting Change in Academia: Strategies for Faculty Leadership. You can find the full call for proposals here:

https://sites.google.com/view/ecasfl/home

A regular review of the trade daily sites like the Chronicle of Higher Education and Inside Higher Ed will demonstrates that there is no shortage of concerns, problems, and challenges facing higher education in the current moment. Reductions in state funding to universities place ever greater pressure on faculty and staff to make cuts, seek new ‘revenue streams’ and do less with less. At the same time, most of the published work on leadership focuses on a narrowly defined sort of leadership, one that is largely unidirectional. This proposed edited collection calls for chapters that deploy a range of methodologies, but that focus on change efforts across a wide range of institutional environments in which writers describe successful change work. Possible topics may include:

Access to and support for students, faculty, and staff (including Students’ Rights to Their Own Language, emergency grants for students in need, parental leave policies, contingent faculty rights, Title IX initiatives, protections for DACA recipients, graduate and faculty labor organizations)

Benefits and workload changes (advocacy for improvements in, and support for, or resistance to imposed changes)

Acknowledgement of the value of particular types of service or research (area studies, scholarship of teaching and learning, public scholarship)

University policies and/or faculty and student led strategies that focus on harassment, bullying, and workplace environments

Methods for dealing effectively with burdensome administrative requests on faculty time

Strategies for confronting the language of crisis in higher education

Histories of effective change (longstanding LGBTQ centers and Women’s Centers, student organizations, faculty development initiatives, academic libraries and librarians, mentoring strategies, leadership development, labor organizing)

Curriculum development or classroom, department, university, or discipline-wide initiatives geared towards inclusion

Equity, transparency, and consistency in performance reviews, tenure and promotion decisions, and other evaluative processes

We seek to acknowledge how change can happen when the people who have the incentive to change (but perhaps little power) and the decision-makers with the power work together. Successful chapters will describe the writers’ goals, how change was leveraged, and how the goals were achieved. We are particularly interested in proposals that address the following:

§ Rhetorical strategies and values for effecting change

§ The roles of various disciplines in making change

§ Interdisciplinary collaboration

§ Cross-campus collaboration

§ Cross-rank collaboration (graduate and faculty, contingent and tenured, faculty and administrative, student and administrative)

§ Confronting white supremacy and engaging in anti-racist decision-making

§ Partnerships between higher education and local communities/community organizations

§ Disciplinary organizations addressing challenges

§ Launching initiatives and securing resources for diverse groups (inclusive and intersectional initiatives that support multicultural, immigrant, LGBTQ, women, veterans, and other students, faculty, and staff)

Please submit a chapter proposal of 500 words to Holly Hassel (holly.hassel@uwc.edu) and Kirsti Cole (kirsti.cole@mnsu.edu) by January 15, 2018. Chapter proposals should describe the author’s primary focus or claim, include a brief discussion of methodology and data sources, and situate the chapter within existing literature on the topic. Chapters will be formatted in MLA style, 8th edition. Please include author(s’) names, institutional affiliation (if relevant), and contact information (email). Acceptances will be confirmed by March 1, 2018. Full manuscripts due September 1, 2018.