Tag Archives: Books

Leading Change in Academic Libraries

We invite chapter proposals for consideration in the publication of a forthcoming ACRL monograph titled Leading Change in Academic Libraries. Contributing authors are asked to describe and reflect on a recent change in their academic library in which they worked with others in the organization to reorganize, reengineer, innovate, or initiate a service, program, function or structure in your library. Authors will be asked to use Kotter’s (1996) “eight stage process for creating major change” to reflect on their change experience
(for more details or go here: http://bit.ly/2CEDJzr ). Criteria for proposals include the following: 
  • The change experience must have been initiated in the past five years
  • The change experience must have been planned by a working group, team, task force or committee of two or more people
  • The change experience must be in an academic library setting at any type of four year institution serving undergraduate and / or graduate students in the United States
  • The change experience does not have to be fully implemented or deemed a complete success
Authors are expected to have expertise and first-hand knowledge of their particular change experience but do not need to have a particular leadership/management title to contribute. While it is not necessary to have used Kotter’s model during the change process, we are asking contributors to use this model as a mechanism to explain and analyze their change experience.
Proposals should include the names of all authors and institutional affiliations, identification of primary contact with e-mail address, proposed title of chapter, and an abstract of no more than 500 words. 

Authors of accepted proposals will be asked to write a chapter within the range of 12-15 pages, double-spaced, including all text, references, tables, images, and photographs.
Proposal submissions are due to Colleen Boff (cboff@bgsu.edu) by February 28, 2018If you plan to submit a proposal, please send Colleen a brief email expressing intent to submit.  Questions about this project may also be directed to Colleen.
Editors will respond to proposal contributors by April 15, 2018. Chapters will be due by August 1, 2018. Proposed publication date for monograph is January, 2019.
Information about the Editors
Colleen Boff is the Head Librarian of the Curriculum Resource Center at Bowling Green State University in Bowling Green, Ohio. She manages and leads a staff of three in supporting the research and curricular needs of students and faculty in the College of Education and Human Development. She has worked in academic libraries for twenty years and has held a wide range of library management and leadership positions for the past eight years including program coordinator, department chair, Associate Dean and head librarian of a specialized collection. Her research interests vary but are mainly in the areas of educational leadership and policy studies, the application of leadership theories in the academic library setting, and the exploration of cultures of reading.
Catherine Cardwell is the Dean of the Nelson Poynter Memorial Library at the University of South Florida Saint Petersburg. Her responsibilities include providing leadership for and fiscal oversight of the library, online learning services, and instructional technology services. The Library recently completed a new strategic plan and is in the process of its implementation. Prior to joining USFSP in 2016, Catherine served as Director of Libraries at Ohio Wesleyan University. From 1998 to 2011, she was a member of the library faculty at Bowling Green State University, where she served in a variety of leadership positions in the libraries and at the university. Her interests include integrating information literacy and digital scholarship into the curriculum, creating dynamic and contemporary user-centered teaching and learning spaces (both physical and online), and improving discovery and usability of library resources and services.

Call for Chapters: Big Data and Knowledge Sharing in Virtual Organizations

IMPORTANT DATES

January 15, 2018: Proposal Submission Deadline
January 25, 2018: Notification of Acceptance
May 15, 2018: Full Chapter Submission
July 15, 2018: Review Results Returned
September 15, 2018: Final Chapter Submission

Editors

Albert Gyamfi (Ph.D)
Aalborg University Copenhagen,

Idongesit Williams (Ph.D)
Aalborg University Copenhagen,

Call for Chapters 
Proposals Submission Deadline: January 15, 2018
Full Chapters Due: May 15, 2018
Submission Date: September 15, 2018

Introduction
This book will focus on the influence of big data analytics, artificial intelligence, as well as, tools, methods, and techniques for knowledge sharing processes in virtual organizations. Knowledge management encompasses various research disciplines ranging from economics, management science, organizational theory, strategic management, human-resources management, information science, knowledge engineering, artificial intelligence, to cognitive science. Knowledge in its pure state is tacit in nature-difficult to formalize and communicate-but can be converted into codified form and shared through both social interactions and the use of IT-based applications and systems. However, Information Technology has proven to be effective tool for supporting the knowledge management life cycle such as capturing, storage, sharing, transferring and even application of knowledge. With the use of IT, knowledge can be converted into data for informed and better decision making by management. However, even though there seems to be considerable synergies between the resulting huge data and the convertible knowledge, there is still a debate on how the increasing amount of data captured by corporations could improve decision-making and foster innovation through effective knowledge sharing practices. Organizations are therefore exploring new knowledge sharing tools, methods, and processes within the broader field of analytics for ensuring continuous development and organizational performance. Meanwhile, organizations, including governments, industries, and academia are becoming more global and losing boundaries, and therefore they can no longer be defined by the traditional horizontal-vertical or external hierarchical predefined structure. Consequently, new organizational forms emerge which relies largely on networking and collaborations through the use of Internet technologies for knowledge flow. Hence a book, which analyzes this trend is timely and would help organizations to strategize themselves on how to use these technologies to effectively manage their intellectual capabilities.

Objective 
This comprehensive and timely publication aims to be an essential reference source, building on the available literature in the field of knowledge management while providing for further research opportunities in this dynamic field. It is hoped that this text will provide the resources necessary for policymakers, academics, researchers, International Governmental organizations, etc, identify current challenges and solutions towards social inclusion with respect to gender.

Target Audience

Policy makers, academicians, researchers, advanced-level students, technology developers, and government officials will find this text useful in furthering their research exposure to current gender-related issues hampering social inclusion enabled by ICTs.

Recommended Topics:

Contributors are welcome to submit chapters on any of the following topics. Related topics but not listed here will be considered.

• Knowledge sharing and business analytics
• Sharing knowledge generated through Big data in virtual organizations
• Media, tools, and techniques for Knowledge sharing in virtual organizations
• Design of knowledge sharing processes through digitalization
• Design of knowledge sharing processes, analytics and decision science
• Artificial Intelligence, machine learning and organizational knowledge sharing
• Media tools, techniques, and method in organizational learning perspective
• Effect of Cloud computing and big data on learning in virtual organizations
• Semantic web ontologies and linked data
• Social Media applications and knowledge sharing
• Challenges and issues related to organizational learning using mobile data
• Current research trends the use of mobile platform for knowledge management
• Influence of mobile platforms in organizational learning
• Influence of cross-culture on collaborative learning using mobile platforms
• Knowledge engineering and decision science

Submission Procedure:

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before January 15, 2018, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by January 25, 2018 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by September 15, 2018. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visitwww.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2018.

Inquiries:

Albert Gyamfi (Ph.D)
email: alberto@es.aau.dk

Idongesit Williams (Ph. D)
email: idong@es.aau.dk

Propose a chapter for this book

Neglected Newberys: A Critical Reassessment at the Centennial

Volume editors: Sara L. Schwebel and Jocelyn Van Tuyl

In anticipation of the one hundredth anniversary of the American Library Association’s Newbery Medal (1922-2022), submissions are welcomed for a volume devoted to critically-neglected Newbery Award-winners.

About the Volume

Since the inception of the Newbery Medal in 1922, Newbery novels have had an outsized influence on American children’s literature, figuring perennially on publisher’s lists, on library and bookstore shelves, and in K-12 school curricula. As such, they offer a compelling window into the history of U.S. children’s literature and publishing as well as changing societal attitudes about what books are “best” for American children. Nevertheless, many Newbery Award winners—even the most popular and frequently taught titles—have attracted scant critical attention.

This volume offers a critically- and historically-grounded analysis of representative Newbery Medal books and interrogates the disjunction between the books’ omnipresence and influence, on the one hand, and the critical silence surrounding them, on the other.

The editors seek at least one previously unpublished essay per decade (1920s-2010s), with each essay to focus primarily on a single Newbery Medal (not Newbery Honor) title for which little or no literary scholarship exists. We welcome submissions from both emerging and established scholars.

We specifically seek a diversity of Newbery authors, genres, themes, and book settings, but also investigations of how diversity is treated or, especially for earlier works, silenced in the texts.

Avenues for exploration include: neglected categories and sub-genres (horse books, maritime adventure stories, regional literature, retold folktales, one-hit wonders for children by well-known authors); reception and book history (alterations of text to avoid offensive language and imagery, both immediately after the Medal and decades later); critical readings of problematic texts; Newbery winners and their archives; hypotheses regarding critical neglect: the rise of Children’s Literature as an academic field long after the Medal’s inception; the disjunction between the Newbery’s historical whiteness and heteronormativity and current developments in literary criticism; a possible disconnect between librarians who award the medal, K-12 teachers who recommend the books, and university professors who are rewarded for publishing literary criticism.

Submission Information

E-mail the editors (schwebel@sc.edu and vantuyl@ncf.edu) for access to the spreadsheet of books on which we are soliciting contributions, contributor resources, and additional specifications to ensure continuity throughout the volume.

Deadline

The deadline for initial proposals of approximately 500 words is April 1, 2018.

We anticipate requesting completed essays of 6000-7000 words by early 2019 (subject to the publisher’s requirements).

Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities

While the debates in and around the digital humanities continue–what they are, why they are, what they contribute to humanities scholarship–those working in the field know the truly transformative work being done both nationally and internationally. This proposed collection of essays, Transformative Projects in the Digital Humanities, will build on the critical work has been done to date to showcase DH scholarship, while expanding the focus to provide a broadly international perspective. To this end, we especially encourage scholars working outside the U.S. to consider submitting a proposal. We have an expression of interest in this project from Routledge.

 

We are looking for essays that not only describe long-term projects/large-impact projects but those that also place the work within a cultural context and what is happening in terms of DH. Finally, proposed essays should be forward looking, addressing the question(s): how does this work indicate where DH is going/where it should be going/where it could be going? Essays may take the form of case studies, if appropriate. A 300-word abstract and one-page c.v. should be submitted by January 22, 2018 to Marta Deyrup <marta.deyrup@shu.edu> and Mary Balkun <mary.balkun@shu.edu>.

 

 

Key Issues in Learning Design and Technology

AECT and Routledge are excited to announce the Key Issues in Learning Design and Technology series. Books published in this series may be individual books or edited volumes that translate cutting-edge research from developments in instructional design and technology into approachable, cross-disciplinary volumes for academic professionals and students. Each book in this series is poised to provide expert perspectives and principles on evolving areas of research, from personalized learning to data and analytics to visual design and beyond. To learn more about the possible topics and proposal guidelines, visit https://sites.google.com/view/ldtseries/home. Questions about this opportunity may be directed to the series co-editors, Linda L. CampionCindy S. York, or Tonia A. Dousay.

Handbook of Research on Challenges and Opportunities in Launching a Technology-Driven International University

Call for Chapters

Propose a Chapter

IMPORTANT DATES

November 30, 2017: Proposal Submission Deadline

December 13, 2017: Notification of Acceptance

January 30, 2018: Full Chapter Submission

March 30, 2018: Review Results Returned

April 30, 2018: Revised Chapter Submission

May 15, 2018: Final Acceptance Notification

May 30, 2018: Submission of Final Chapters

Editors

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., Information Resources Management Association (IRMA), USA

Introduction 
The global digital economy is rapidly increasing the demand for educated, highly trained and globally focused professionals. Launching accessible technology-driven higher learning institutions that offer a transformational educational and research experience can effectively prepare future leaders with the knowledge resources and tools they need to meet the demands of the 21st century. Launching any academic and/or research-based institution can be a challenge. There are various struggles involved in creating a robust curriculum and recruiting top-rated faculty from across the globe; while also meeting the critical facility approval and accreditation criteria to offer sound and effective academic programs and degrees to culturally diverse students from all over the world.

 

Objective 
The aim of this comprehensive publication is to offer both empirical and theoretical research focused on the effective construction of technology-driven higher learning international universities.  Themes such as: developing an accelerated and innovative curriculum, the recruitment and retention of internationally renowned faculty and researchers to lead courses, as well as the development of an on-campus and distance learning system will be presented. Also, taking into consideration the financial and economic impacts of launching a university – specifically, how to identify the appropriate locale for universities and/or branch campuses, which will ideally complement the local interest of business sectors within the selected location.

 

The goal of every university should be to create a transformative impact on society through continual innovation in education, research, and entrepreneurship. Also, creating a direct connection between education and workforce development; offering programs that are designed to align with and exceed standard models and that focus on deep disciplinary knowledge, critical thinking and problem solving, leadership, communication, professional development, and interpersonal skills. Overall, assisting students with realizing their educational goals by integrating core values such as: educational excellence, student-centered course development, lifelong learning, a respectful environment, flexible learning, diversity, global leadership, research contributions, entrepreneurship, partnership, excellent service, and of course the highest quality.

Target Audience 
Entrepreneurs, practitioners, academicians, instructional designers, administrators, government officials, and independent researchers and consultants focused on digital research and scholarship, educational leadership and administration, educational marketing, educational policy, course management, instructional design, educational theory and practice, human resources in educational settings, and curriculum design.

Recommended Topics:

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Administration and faculty recruitment
  • International student recruiting programs
  • Curriculum development
  • Online learning management systems
  • Synchronous and asynchronous methods for online teaching
  • Blended learning programs
  • Student services for online programs
  • Online faculty professional development
  • Online education and job placement programs
  • Online programs and business partnerships
  • Licensing and accreditation processes
  • Selecting an optimal location
  • Technical considerations in facility development
  • Educational marketing techniques
  • Student retention programs
  • Putting together a business proposal and plan
  • Funding and budgeting programs and processes
  • Complementing the local business economic interests
  • Financial and economic impacts on local economy
  • Environmental sensitivity and considerations
  • Selection and design of a course delivery system
  • Design and management of technology infrastructure
  • Leadership and management of the institution
  • Managing operational aspects of the institution

 

Submission Procedure:

Authors are invited to submit a brief chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of their proposed chapter by November 30, 2017. Authors of accepted proposals will be notified by no later than December 13, 2017 about the status of their proposals and will receive chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by January 30, 2018. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind basis. Contributors may also be requested to be engaged as reviewers for this project.

Language:
Submissions will be made in English (American or British usage is accepted, but not a mixture of these). Authors who feel their English language paper submission may require editing to eliminate possible grammatical or spelling errors and to conform to correct scientific English will use editing/proofreading services on their own. IGI Global recommends eContent Pro® Copy Editing Services.

 

Publisher:

This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released as part of the 2019 copyright year.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this publication. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process. All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery® online submission manager.

Inquiries:

Inquiries may be directed to:
Ms. Courtney Tychinski, Managing Editor – Acquisitions and Development

ctychinski@igi-global.com

Propose a Chapter

ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice)

The ACRL/CLS CLIPP (College Library Information on Policy and Practice) Committee invites you to submit a preliminary proposal for its CLIPP publication series. We welcome proposals on any topic that is relevant for small and mid-sized academic libraries. The CLIPP series allows library staff to share information on practices and procedures they have implemented to address common issues or concerns. Each CLIPP follows a set structure of three parts (literature review, survey results, and sample documents), and should both describe library best practices and provide useful, specific examples that libraries can refer to when developing similar policies and procedures of their own.

Authors of a CLIPP publication are aided throughout by the CLIPP Committee and an assigned editor. CLIPP authors receive 10% of the royalties on the net revenues from their publication. For your reference, please find author instructions and more information about the CLIPP program at http://bit.ly/2bjTTDP.

CLIPP proposals are accepted throughout the year. The next Preliminary Proposal Deadline is December 15, 2017. The CLIPP Committee will send out notifications regarding this round of submissions by January 17, 2018.

For questions or to submit a proposal, please contact:

Mary Francis

CLIPP Committee Chair

Email: mary.francis@dsu.edu

Unruly Catholic Women Volume 4

Call for Submissions (extended): Third- and Fourth-Wave Catholic Women Writers: The Future of Unruly Women in the Catholic Church.  Jeana DelRosso, Leigh Eicke, and Ana Kothe seek contributions for the fourth volume in their Unruly Catholic Women series.  In this volume, we seek creative pieces by third- and fourth-wave feminists on Roman Catholicism, with an eye to the future of the Catholic Church.  Please submit autobiographical stories, fictional pieces, prose, or poems tojdelrosso@ndm.edu AND anam.kothe@upr.edu by 17 December 2017, for consideration.  All submissions must be in English.

Dr. Jeana DelRosso
Professor of English and Women’s Studies
Director of the Morrissy Honors Program
Notre Dame of Maryland University
4701 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD  21210
jdelrosso@ndm.edu

Creativity for Success and Personal Growth for Librarians

Book Publisher: McFarland

Vera Gubnitskaia, co-editor, Library Partnerships with Writers and Poets (McFarland,
2017); public, academic librarian, indexer.

Carol Smallwood, co-editor, Gender Studies in the Library (McFarland, 2017); public
library administrator, special, school librarian.

One or two chapters sought from U.S. practicing academic, public, school, special
librarians, LIS faculty, library administrators, and board members. Successful proposals
will address creative, practical, how-to chapters and case studies depicting a variety of
aspects and angles of the library profession as a creative endeavor, within the library
walls and beyond. We are looking for ideas that can serve as a foundation, to
incorporate into an MLIS course; a Human Resources’ or an organizational plan, as well
as a kick-start to personal career goals planning. The focus is on library staff
professional and personal growth and development, NOT creative programming and
services for patrons.

No previously published, simultaneously submitted material. One, two, or three authors
per chapter; each chapter by the same author(s). Compensation: one complimentary
copy per 3,000-4,000 word chapter accepted no matter how many co-authors or if one
or two chapters; author discount. Contributors are expected to sign a release form in
order to be published.

Please e-mail titles of proposed chapter(s) with a concise clear summary by November
30, 2017, with brief bio on each author; place CRE, Your Name, on subject line to
gubnitv11@gmail.com

The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Call for Chapters:

Working Title: The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Editors: Darren Chase & Dana Haugh

Submission Deadline: December 1st

Publisher: ALA Editions


Book Description

This peer-reviewed collection will bring together a dynamic set of librarians, scholars, practitioners, policy makers and thinkers in order to take measure of the open access movement. Critical essays, research, case studies and other pieces will create a substantial, far-reaching text.  This collection will be critical and practical, and provide practical examples and theory in understanding the open access movement, open data, open educational resources, open knowledge, and the opportunity for an open and transformed world.


More and more universities–often spearheaded by university libraries–are adopting open access policies as a practical way to promote open access and further the research enterprise, while countering the often closed, restrictive and costly scholarly journals and databases.  This book will provide a substantial and practical overview of the open access movement, along with critical essays and consideration of the meaning of open access and its potential to leverage existing technology to transform how we support, share and access research.


We are looking for case studies, research, and critical essays on various aspects of open access scholarship, including:


  • Library Open Access Initiatives (implementations, challenges, processes, training, promotion/outreach, etc.)

  • Open Access Publishers & Journals (reception, evaluation measures, predatory publishers)

  • Repositories (green open access, university-specific, network of open repositories, discipline-specific platforms)

  • Open Educational Resources (current landscape, value/usage, challenges)

  • Open Data (data repositories, linked data, metadata, research data management)

  • Publishing Models (gold open access, new models, university presses, peer-review etc)

  • Research consortia, governmental & NGO initiatives

  • Public access to publically-funded research

  • University policies on open access (issues of mandatory vs. voluntary, on-boarding faculty/staff, creating buy-in, etc.)

  • Future of open access

  • Other areas of open scholarship


Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: December 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 15, 2017


Submissions

Please use this form to submit abstracts of 200-500 words.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter relates to open scholarship. Multiple submissions are welcome. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 3,000-5,000 word range (some exceptions will be made for longer chapters). Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Please direct any questions to Darren Chase (darren.chase@stonybrook.edu) or Dana Haugh (dana.haugh@stonybrook.edu)


About the editors

Darren Chase is Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University.  His research interests include open access, crowdfunded research, online learning, digital badging and information literacy. Darren has written and presented widely on myriad scholarly publishing topics.  He spearheaded the development and eventual adoption of the Stony Brook University Open Access Policy, and coordinates the annual Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium.


Dana Haugh is Web Services Librarian at Stony Brook University Libraries where she leads the design and development of the library’s web presences. Her research interests include web design, open access, marketing & outreach in libraries, and information literacy. Dana has extensive experience writing for top journals and monographs in the library field. She’s particularly focused on ensuring scholarship is openly accessible and helps manage her university’s institutional repository which promotes open access to scholarship published by Stony Brook University faculty.