Tag Archives: Journals

E-Resource Round Up column in Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL)

This is a call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 30, issue 1 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

 

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Friday, November 17, 2017. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

 

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

 

Bob Wolverton

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-0548

bwolverton@library.msstate.edu

 

Karen Davidson

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-3018

kdavidson@library.msstate.edu

 

 

 

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL

It’s that time again, folks! Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL needs *YOUR* content! We’re looking for articles, annotated bibliographies, and materials reviews! You can submit one of two ways:
1. Through the Codex website at http://codex.acrlla.org
2. Or directly to this email (lowe@ulm.edu)
Regardless of which way you choose to submit, please make sure to read the Author’s Guidelines page(http://journal.acrlla.org/index.php/codex/about/submissions#authorGuidelines).

Deadline for submissions will be Friday, October 27, 2017, by 4:30pmRemember: you don’t have to be a librarian, work in Louisiana, or even be a member of ACRL or ACRL-LA to submit – we welcome submissions from staff and LIS students as well! We’re all in this together! Please feel free to share this with your colleagues!
If you have questions regarding submissions to the journal, or would like to talk to me about an idea for an article, please don’t hesitate to contact me!
Megan Lowe, Editor

VIEW Journal Call for Papers on “Audiovisual Data in Digital Humanities”

Considering the relevance of audiovisual material as perhaps the biggest wave of data to come in the near future (Smith, 2013, IBM prospective study) its relatively modest position within the realm of Digital Humanities conferences is remarkable. The objective of this special issue for VIEW is to present current research in that field on a variety of epistemological, historiographical and technological issues that are specific for digital methods applied to audiovisual data. We strive to cover a great range of media and data types and of applications representing the various stages of the research process.

The following key topics / problems / questions are of special interest:

  1. Do computational approaches to sound and (moving) images extend or/and change our conceptual and epistemological understanding of these media? What are the leading machine learning approaches to the study of audio and visual culture and particularly time-based media? How do these approaches, models, and methods of learning relate to acquiring and producing knowledge by the conventional means of reading and analyzing text? Do we understand the 20th century differently through listening to sounds and voices and viewing images than through reading texts? How does massive digitization and online access relate to the concept of authenticity and provenance?
  2. What tools in the sequence of the research process – search, annotation, vocabulary, analysis, presentation – are best suited to work with audio-visual data? The ways in which we structure and process information are primarily determined by the convention of attributing meaning to visual content through text. Does searching audio-visual archives, annotating photos or film clips, analyzing a corpus of city sounds, or presenting research output through a virtual exhibition, require special dedicated tools? What is the diversity in requirements within the communities of humanities scholars? How can, for example, existing commercial tools or software be repurposed for scholarly use?
  3. What are the main hurdles for the further expansion of AV in DH? Compared to text, audiovisual data as carriers of knowledge are a relatively young phenomenon. Consequently the question of ‘ownership’ and the commercial value of many audiovisual sources result in considerable constraints for use due to issues of copyright. A constraint of a completely different order, is the intensive investment in time needed when listening to or watching an audiovisual corpus, compared to reading a text. Does the law or do technologies for speech and image retrieval offer solutions to overcome these obstacles?

Practicals
Contributions are encouraged from authors with different kinds of expertise and interests in media studies, digital humanities, television and media history.
Paper proposals (max. 500 words) are due on October 2nd , 2017.
Submissions should be sent to the managing editor of the journal, Dana Mustata.
A notice of acceptance will be sent to authors in the 1st week of November 2017.
Articles (3 – 6,000 words) will be due on 15 th of February 2018. Longer articles are welcome, given that they comply with the journal’s author guidelines.
For further information or questions about the issue, please contact the co-editors: Mark Williams (Associate Professor Film and Media Studies, Dartmouth College U.S.), Pelle Snickars (Prof. of Media Studies Umea Univesity, Sweden) or Andreas Fickers (Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History).

About VIEW Journal
See http://www.viewjournal.eu/ for the current and back issues. VIEW is supported by the EUscreen Network and published by the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision in collaboration with Utrecht University, Royal Holloway University of London, and University of Luxembourg. VIEW is proud to be an open access journal. All articles are indexed through the Directory of Open Access Journals, the EBSCO Film and Television Index, Paperity and NARCIS.

Educational Forum Themed issue on Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Call for Manuscripts for Themed Issue

The Educational Forum

Volume 82, No. 3

Educator Activism in Politically Polarized Times

Editors: Alan Amtzis, Tabitha Dell’Angelo, and Ryan Flessner

Due date: November 1, 2017

What is the impact of political polarization on curricula, pedagogy, funding, and other imposed policies across the educational landscape? How are P-16+ educators and school leaders responding to politically motivated intellectual and policy challenges at the school level? In what ways are teacher educators revising their materials and methods in response to political strife? How are educators negotiating political conflicts with government and community stakeholders at all levels?

For example, some educators in the UK hope to revive political education at the school level as a means to create a more civically literate society. Similarly, in the US, where the federal administration has taken controversial stances on climate change, civil rights, and immigration, many teachers are adjusting curricula and pedagogy to emphasize and retain access to social and scientific knowledge important to a just and inclusive democracy. In many countries and cultures around the globe, educational processes are being mediated by state-sponsored mandates. This themed issue seeks to explore and highlight the educational advocacy and activist work being done in the name of global literacy, social justice, and resistance in a political climate where new filters on knowledge may seek to dismantle public education and affiliated social institutions by limiting critical perspectives in students’ educational experience.

Research articles, essays, and policy briefs might address questions or ideas such as:

  • the ways schools and communities are implementing strategies that recognize and respond to conditions that contribute to (or address) education inequity
  • the methods educators are taking to actualize and maintain strong social justice stances in and out of the classroom
  • the approaches educators, students, and communities are taking to organize as participants in the growing movement to resist political agendas
  • the individual or local pedagogic practices and wide-scale reforms being implemented to ensure student access to all knowledge

These questions suggest topic areas but are not exhaustive. We encourage submissions not only from scholars and researchers but also from students, teachers, and community members.

Submissions should not exceed 7,000 words, including all references.

We seek previously unpublished thematic essays or empirical research. For full instructions, please visit: http://www.kdp.org/publications/theeducationalforum/authorguidelines.php

Submission deadline: November 1, 2017. Submissions must be made at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/utef

Please include the code “823” at the beginning of your manuscript title.

For more information, please contact the issue co-editors:

Dr. Alan Amtzis (amtzis@tcnj.edu),

Dr. Tabitha Dell’Angelo (dellange@tcnj.edu), or Dr. Ryan Flessner (rflessne@butler.edu).

 

Journal of Formative Design in Learning

An official journal of the Association for Educational Communications & Technology

Presents original papers that inform the study and practice of education and training

Bridges theory and practice, discussing new developments and their impact on the practice of education and training

Fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process

Journal of Formative Design in Learning bridges the gap between theory and practice by providing reflective practitioners (designers, teachers, instructors, researchers, and others) in teaching and learning with a single source of scholarly papers that discuss new developments and the impact of this new knowledge on the field. The journal publishes original papers on research-based design and development with a focus on applied research, including evaluation reports, action research, case studies, and lessons learned that inform improvement in instruction, and design and development approaches. While the main audience is practitioners, all articles are grounded in established research and theory. The journal encourages and nurtures the development of reflective practitioners of the learning sciences and serves to update and redefine the concept of learning. The journal fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process, and articles inform the study and practice of education and training. The journal provides opportunities not only to established academics and practitioners, but also to junior faculty and emerging scholars. A formative peer-review process is specifically designed to help less experienced authors understand the submission, review, and publication processes of this peer-reviewed academic journal.

For more information about submissions go to http://www.editorialmanager.com/JFDL/default.aspx

Journal of Access Services special issue on textbooks in libraries

What is the role of textbooks in today‘s libraries?

Like the cost of journal subscriptions, the price for textbooks have been increasing.  Unlike journals, students feel an immediate financial burden when the time comes to purchase their course textbooks.  Universities and libraries have recognized this and many are doing interesting things to address this issue.  The increased popularity of Open Educational Resources (OER) and other similar endeavors provides us with an opportunity to share those stories.  But I know there are other stories out there to share.  The Journal of Access Services<http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wjas20/current> is seeking manuscripts for an upcoming special issue that will address the role and impact of textbooks within libraries.  This special issue will be comprised of case studies from a variety of types of libraries and hopefully a guest editorial.
Submissions may focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:

*         Impact of textbooks on course reserves

*         Designing unique textbook programs within a library

*         Interlibrary loan and textbooks – how do libraries handle this?

*         Assessment studies on textbook use within a library

*         Collaborations/partnerships with faculty/bookstore/student services regarding textbook access

*         OER or similar programs – how were they developed and what was the impact on library users/staff?

*         What is the future of the textbook in libraries?
I’m very excited to see what is happening in this area and look forward to sharing a great topical issue with all of you!
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me about this particular topic or any other possible submissions.
FYI – while this will be an upcoming special topic issue, we are always reviewing submissions for other related topics for other upcoming issues.

TechTrends special issue on current innovative research methodology in the instructional design and technology field

The Research and Theory Division of AECT is sponsoring a special issue of TechTrends related to current innovative research methodology in the instructional design and technology field. We welcome proposals in which researchers are rigorously using innovative methods of data collection and analysis as part of an investigation that helps further advance knowledge on the field.

Special Issue Co – Editors

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.
University of Tampa
eromerohall@ut.edu

E-ling Hsiao, Ph.D.
Valdosta State University
ehsiao@valdosta.edu

Fei Gao, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
gaof@bgsu.edu

Submissions should align with the RTD mission to promote the development and advancement of theory; promotes, presents, and disseminates research and scholarship that encompasses multiple perspectives; advocates the study of social and cultural issues in the field; supports, fosters, and mentors emerging scholars. The division provides a professional community for AECT members with an interest in research and theory. The following is a non-exhaustive list of possible innovative methods of data collection and analysis:

– Educational data mining
– Learning analytics
– Social network analysis
– Advanced statistical modeling
– Network anthropology
– Eye tracking
– EEG
– fMRI
– Other physiological measures
– Integrative approaches to ‘mixing’ qualitative research
– Netnography
– Person-centered analyses
– Interactional ethnography
– Rhizoanalysis
– Photovoice
– Art-based data analyses
– Appreciative inquiry
– Concept mapping research
– Visual analysis
– And other innovative research methodologies

Expected publication date: September 2018

Submission Information
Articles should follow the writing style guidelines for Tech Trends. Submissions should be 4000-­-5000 words in length (10 ­-15 pages) and abstracts should not exceed 150 words. Use APA formatting throughout.

Please upload a PDF file with your name, institution, and email address as well as a brief overview (approx. 500 words) of the proposed article using the following link: http://tiny.cc/TechTrendsRTDSpecialIssue for initial review. If accepted for review, you will be directed to a Tech Trends portal for this special issue where you will submit your full article per the schedule below.

We kindly ask authors to also serve as reviewers for the submissions. Reviewers will also be requested from the overall AECT RTD membership. Thank you.

Important Dates
• August 7, 2017 – Call for Proposals posted
• September 15, 2017 – Proposals due: http://tiny.cc/TechTrendsRTDSpecialIssue
• October 16, 2017 – Notify accepted proposals
• January 29, 2018 – Full submissions due AND start peer review process
• March 16, 2018 – Reviews due
• April 27, 2018 – Notify authors of review decisions
• June 1, 2018 – Final and reviewed papers due

Best regards,

Enilda Romero-Hall, Ph.D.
RTD President

Assistant Professor
College of Social Science, Mathematics, and Education
The University of Tampa

The Journal of Archival Organization 

The Journal of Archival Organization is an international, peer-reviewed journal encompassing all aspects of the arrangement, description, and provision of access to all forms of archival materials.

JAO addresses a broad range of issues of interest to the profession including archival management and staffing, archival technologies, the arrangement and description of records collection, collection growth and access, diversity and gender, grant-funding, and institutional support. Articles addressing academic, public and special/corporate libraries, museums and governmental agencies are all welcome.

How to submit:

Manuscripts should be submitted electronically to Marta Deyrup  martadeyrup@gmail.com

The separate abstract page should be single-spaced to include a 100-word abstract, list of keywords for indexing purposes, and author(s) footnote (name, title, affiliation, address, and email address), with identification of the corresponding author.

References, citations, and general style of manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the APA Publication Manual, 6th ed. Cite in the text by author and date (Smith, 1983) and include an alphabetical list of references at the end of the article.

For more information about the Journal of Archival Organization, please visit the journal’s webpage: www.tandfonline.com/WJAO

 

Violence Against Women: Special Issue on Gender-based violence on college campuses

Submissions for a special issue of the journal *Violence Against Women* are
sought from scholars and community activists working to end gender based
violence on college campuses. Papers in the special issue will examine
activist and other transformational responses to GBV by students, faculty
and staff, and the ways they are enacting change locally to challenge the
scaffolding of GBV, often described as rape culture (Buchwald, Fletcher &
Roth, 2005; Henry & Powell, 2014), lad culture (Phipps and Young, 2015),
and laddism (Lewis, Marine, & Kenney, 2016). The prioritising of
programmatic, solution-based interventions to tackle GBV in the university
context poses unique challenges to meaningful cultural transformation,
which this volume will productively explore. The special issue provides an
opportunity for critical engagement with institutional policies and
practices in terms of how they contribute to or inhibit cultural
transformation.

Abstracts of 250 words should be submitted by *August 7th* to *Dr. Ruth
Lewis *(ruth.lewis@northumbria.ac.uk) and *Dr. Susan Marine* (
marines@merrimack.edu).