Tag Archives: Publishing

Journal of Play in Adulthood”

The new “Journal of Play in Adulthood” now has an open call for papers!
This new diamond open access journal (free to read and publish in) would welcome papers from information literacy practitioners and researchers. Research based articles are subject to double blind peer review, but we also welcome articles from practice, extended essays, and reviews that might be of interest to our readers.
Key topics of interest to the journal include the role of play in learning, work, our social and cultural lives, the benefits to individuals and society, and the interrelationship between play and other areas of adult life. The focus of this journal is on play in adulthood to explicitly distinguish it from children’s play, and to highlight that the motivations, contexts, and forms of play are, in many cases, different. In summary, it covers playful living, playful working, and playful learning.

Contact:

Andrew Walsh MSc MCLIP FHEA FRSA IFNTF

University Teaching Fellow, National Teaching Fellow

Academic Librarian for Education and Professional Development.

Editor of the Journal of Play in Adulthood

https://www.journalofplayinadulthood.org.uk

I

Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education journals

AACE Invites You to Submit for Publication in These Internationally Respected Journals!

 AACE Journals Include:

Submission guidelines http://publish.aace.org/begin/

AACE Publications | Email: pubs@aace.orgaace.org/pubs

Mobile App Develepment in Libraries

Primary Research Group, https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=www.Primaryresearch.com&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C439b9351e97c4a15ff0708d693751594%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636858528416762512&sdata=t9uuib3QAJ1m7VbOZz4v%2B%2BeaH%2BxZp7lILagFEGYLmE4%3D&reserved=0, is seeking an author to write a monograph of approximately 10,000 words on academic library use of mobile apps, both vendor and library developed The monograph should include at least 6 interviews primarily with colleges and universities  (at least three of which should be research universities) averaging about 1,500 words each. In addition, the author might include results of a summary of a literature search or interviews with app private sector app publishers. Some of the issues that might be discussed are: use of vendor supplied apps, info literacy training in apps for students and faculty, measurement/assessment of app use,  breakdown of app use by application and platform, development and cost of library apps, staff training for app development, determination of app needs, and more.

This is a compensated assignment.  To apply to write this monograph please
send your resume to jmoses@primaryresearch.com.

Reference Services Review

Reference Services Review seeks journal article contributions for a special issue that will explore themes related to academic libraries and the 45th President of the United States. The issue will be published in January, 2020 (48/1). Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • the impact of misinformation, disinformation, and distrust of media outlets on library education services
  • the impact of the partial government shutdown on access to federal government information and/or services, grant funded research, etc.
  • campus climate: safety and security, free speech versus hate speech, collaboration with student organizations
  • campus/community engagement and programming
  • work with and/or support services for DACA students
  • the impact on federal government documents, e.g., removal of the phrase “climate change,” requests from federal agencies to purge historical documents and records, archiving the President’s social media posts, etc.
  • library involvement with social justice initiatives on campus
  • innovative dissemination of election, candidate, and voter registration information to constituents

The journal welcomes thought pieces, case studies, and articles about issues and trends that address specific opportunities or challenges related to academic libraries and the current administration. Potential contributors are encouraged to be creative in developing topics.

Topic proposals should be submitted to Mary Ellen Spencer via the web form at https://tinyurl.com/rsr-45th.  Please direct any questions to her at mespencer@pstcc.edu.

Journal of Applied Instructional Design

(JAID) (https://www.jaid.pub/)

issue on Instructional Design in Medical and Healthcare Education

To facilitate medical and healthcare education (including the preparation and professional development of physicians, nurses, professional staff, and administrators), educators and instructional designers must gain a critical understanding of the contemporary issues facing a wide range of professionals in a variety of schools, hospitals, clinics, and other health-related facilities. Similarly, to advance the adoption and application of instructional design methods, it is vital for healthcare professionals to value and gain knowledge of grounded, systematic design principles and practices.

This special issue of the Journal of Applied Instructional Design (JAID) will focus on research and the development of innovative training and educational programs that apply systematic instructional design tools and techniques to create engaging, effective, and efficient learning experiences. The fundamental purpose of the special issue is to nurture collaboration between academics and practitioners in instructional design and healthcare as a means of advancing learning and disseminating new ideas. Manuscripts that highlight the skills and knowledge instructional designers require to be successful in healthcare settings, or otherwise address contemporary trends and issues in healthcare that affect the analysis, design, development, implementation and/or evaluation of training and education are also welcome.

Please submit a short proposal, including a title, a one to two page summary, and an outline of the proposed manuscript to Dr. Hirumi at Atsusi.Hirumi@ucf.edu by midnight, Sunday, March 31, 2019. Selected authors will be notified by April 30 and invited to submit complete manuscripts by Friday, August 2, 2019 for publication in the October 2019 edition of JAID. Please Note: An invitation to submit a complete manuscript does not guarantee the manuscript will be published; all manuscripts must still undergo full peer review process.

Playing and Pedagogy: The Theory and Practice of Teaching with Video Games

Hello all,

I’m writing to announce a call for contributions for a special feature in Films for the Feminist Classroom.

Playing and Pedagogy: The Theory and Practice of Teaching with Video Games

Video games and films—both genres increasingly share tropes in their design, aesthetic, and reliance on narrative plots. Video games often use a short film to introduce players to the rules and characters, and action films can rely so much on computer generated imagery that it’s not clear where the computer ends and the “real world” begins. Moreover, films and video games at some times (re)produce status quo norms and hierarchies and at other times offer a path toward radical social justice. In this sense, both serve as forms of entertainment and instruction, pleasure and discomfort. And both can be useful for teaching skills, ideas, and content for educators in various settings.

Considering these similarities, Films for the Feminist Classroom (https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fffc.twu.edu%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7Cc25907b16bef4499101708d687b5658e%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636845610496606759&sdata=runjDjANceZsx4HP1F4%2BLaLWlopbYQp8OaGDFDbUyys%3D&reserved=0) is developing a special feature about intersections of gaming/film/video media and pedagogy for an upcoming issue. We are looking for contributions that explore gaming in relation to pedagogy and that in some way critically engage or address hierarchies of power and privilege. We also ask contributors to consider topics relevant to gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, ability, socioeconomic class, religion, and other social, biological, and cultural influences.

We are interested in short essays (1500-2500 words), game reviews, and lesson plans that offer resources for educators who might consider using gaming in their teaching. Proposals are welcome from a range of theoretical and methodological frameworks, that span a range of fields and disciplines, and that explore various media forms, topics, and content. Educators at a variety of phases of their careers—graduate students to retired faculty—and at a variety of locations, including primary and secondary schools, colleges and universities, and community centers, as well as from different countries, are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Proposals may address but are not limited to the following areas:
— crafting a syllabus and/or a unit within a syllabus about gaming
— incorporating game design in lesson plans
— gaming assignments and/or activities that educators could use
— how different educational settings affect the media and pedagogical strategies we use
— rethinking education material and approaches with gaming
— explicitly pedagogical games
— pairing film/video media and readings
— deconstructing and analyzing video games as a class activity
— the cultural dimensions of gaming
— gamergate threats and harassment and the effect on student’s perception of gaming communities
— gender, race, class, sexuality, ability, religion, etc. in relation to video games
— social justice in gaming narratives
— the rhetoric of video games
— experimental or avant garde video games
— pairing film/video media and readings
— how video games can reinforce and disrupt norms
— the relationship between gaming and other participatory and social media platforms

Proposals should be 150-200 words and cite the specific short media you will discuss in the essay. The deadline for submitting proposals is February 20, 2019. If accepted, completed contributions will be due April 15, 2019.

Please submit proposals and direct any questions to ffc@twu.edu or to Agatha Beins at abeins@twu.edu / 940-898-2117. More information about submitting proposals can be found here: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fffc.twu.edu%2Fcall_4_proposals.html&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7Cc25907b16bef4499101708d687b5658e%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636845610496606759&sdata=ZVoFyFUcufriihsokghoYDfse01FmRHnZm5ni%2FlDr6o%3D&reserved=0.

Agatha Beins
Associate Professor
Department of Multicultural Women’s and Gender Studies
Texas Woman’s University
Editor, Films for the Feminist Classroom

Academic Plagiarism: Librarians’ solo and collaborative efforts to curb academic plagiarism

Introducing a new Call for Proposals (CfP):

 Working Title:

“Academic Plagiarism: Librarians’ solo and collaborative efforts to curb academic plagiarism”

 In consultation with Jessica Gribble, senior acquisitions editor with Libraries Unlimited / ABC-CLIO, Russell Michalak, MLIS and Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. are soliciting chapter proposals for this proposed edited collection. The general timeline we are proposing is a completed volume by January 2020 so you would have several months to work on your contribution. If you are interested in authoring a chapter, please complete this form by the end of the day on Friday, February 22, 2019: https://gbcir.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_ebXDPRALjnJyDxb

Envisioning the Framework: A Graphic Guide to Information Literacy

Call for Chapter Proposals

We are seeking chapter proposals for a volume that has been accepted for publication by ACRL. The chapters will be peer reviewed and publication date is tentatively expected in Spring 2021.

 

Working Title: Envisioning the Framework: A Graphic Guide to Information Literacy

Editor: Jannette L. Finch, MLIS

Abstract submission deadline: February 28, 2019

Book description

Envisioning the Framework offers opportunities for librarians and designers to explore The Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education and its relationship with library data, including assessment, instruction, student learning outcomes, improvements in student learning over time, differences in instruction type, comparison of student level, and much more.

The Framework is a set of core ideas representing threshold concepts in information literacy. In Envisioning the Framework, the significance and implications of the Framework and other developments in information literacy are clarified through effective visualizations. Graphic representations of the Framework allow library professionals to easily share concepts with faculty from other disciplines, with library colleagues, and with students. Understanding the relationships between the Frames, student learning outcomes, and assignments within a multidisciplinary environment is enhanced when visualized graphically.

Although data visualization is a burgeoning field, visualizations of library-related themes and data are relatively scarce and ripe for exploration. Envisioning the Frameworkexplores visualizations of significant information literacy concepts in multiple chapters from experts in data visualization, library professionals, and information literacy practitioners.

Sample Chapters may include:

·         The Frames Visualized as a Whole

·         The Frames and Information Literacy

o   Visualizing the Frames in context with threshold concepts in other disciplines

o   Visualizing the Frames aligned with Learner Groups: First-Year experience; Learning Communities; the Metaliterate Learner, etc.

o   Visualizing the Frames and Information Literacy Instruction: Online and Face to Face; Subject-Specific and Introductory; Freshmen to Grad; Adult Learners, First Generation; Community Colleges; STEAM; Humanities; Students at Risk; etc.

·         The Frames and Assessment

o   Visualizing Student Learning over Time

o   Visualizing Information Literacy Efforts Across Multiple Universities

·         The Frames as Interactive 3D Models

 

Don’t see your topic/idea here? We encourage you to contact the editor atfinchj@cofc.edu to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Not necessary:

Definitions of the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education, definitions of data or information visualization, a history of data visualization, overviews of graphic design, lists of visualization tools. If you have something in this category you think is compelling and wish to be considered, please contact the editor.

Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: February 28, 2019

Notification/feedback regarding submission: March 15, 2019

First drafts due: August 15, 2019

Tentative publication date: Spring 2021

Submission Process

A short form with an attached Word document (.doc or .docx) is required for proposal submission. The Word document should be written in Times New Roman, 12 pt., be double-spaced, and include:

  • A working title
  • Names of all contributing authors & their respective institutions
  • Contact information for the primary author
  • Estimated final word count
  • A brief (250-500 word) description of your proposed chapter

Attach your chapter submission proposal to an email with the subject line: Chapter Proposal Submission_(PrimaryAuthor’sLastName)
And send to: finchj@cofc.edu

Proposals DUE: February 28, 2019

Questions?

Jannette L. Finch, Editor

843-670-3099

finchj@cofc.edu

Editor bio

Jannette Finch is a research and instruction librarian at the College of Charleston. She is interested in information design, effective teaching through experiential learning activities, constructivist techniques in the teaching and learning environment, adult learners, visualizing data, the library role in the scholarly community, assessment and planning. She is the primary author of two peer-reviewed articles featuring data visualization and co-author of six book chapters in the Publications in Librarianship series, Framing Information Literacy.

Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ)

The Code4Lib Journal (C4LJ) exists to foster community and share information among those interested in the intersection of libraries, technology, and the future.

We are now accepting proposals for publication in our 44th issue.  Don’t miss out on this opportunity to share your ideas and experiences. To be included in the 44th issue, which is scheduled for publication in early May, 2019, please submit proposals to http://journal.code4lib.org/submit-proposal by Friday, February 1, 2019. The editorial committee will review all proposals and notify those accepted by Friday, Friday February 8, 2019.  Please note that submissions are subject to rejection or postponement at any point in the publication process as determined by the Code4Lib Journal’s editorial committee.

C4LJ encourages creativity and flexibility, and the editors welcome submissions across a broad variety of topics that support the mission of the journal. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Practical applications of library technology (both actual and hypothetical)
  • Technology projects (failed, successful, or proposed), including how they were done and challenges faced
  • Case studies
  • Best practices
  • Reviews
  • Comparisons of third party software or libraries
  • Analyses of library metadata for use with technology
  • Project management and communication within the library environment
  • Assessment and user studies

    C4LJ strives to promote professional communication by minimizing the barriers to publication. While articles should be of a high quality, they need not follow any formal structure. Writers should aim for the middle ground between blog posts and articles in traditional refereed journals. Where appropriate, we encourage authors to submit code samples, algorithms, and pseudo-code. For more information, visit C4LJ’s Article Guidelines or browse articles from the earlier issues published on our website: http://journal.code4lib.org.

Send in a submission. Your peers would like to hear what you are doing.

Junior Tidal, Coordinating Editor for Issue 44

Code4Lib Journal Editorial Committee

Leveraging Technology for the Improvement of School Safety and Student Wellbeing

Proposal Submission Deadline: February 12, 2019

A book edited by Dr. Stephanie Huffman, Dr. Stacey Loyless, Dr. Shelly Allbritton, and Dr. Charlotte Green (University of Central Arkansas)

Introduction
Technology permeates all aspects of today’s school systems. An Internet search on technology in schools can generate millions of website results. The vast majority of these websites (well over 8,000,000 results for one simple search) focuses on advice, activities, and uses of technology in the classroom. Clearly teaching and learning with technology dominates the literature and conversations on how technology should or could be used in classroom settings. A search on school safety and technology can produce more than 3,000,000 results with many addressing technological tools such as video cameras, entry control devices, weapon detectors, and other such hardware. However, in recent times, cyberbullying appears to dominate the Internet conversations in references to school safety. With an increase in school violence in the past two decades, school safety is a fundamental concern in our nation’s schools. Policy makers, educators, parents, and students are seeking answers in how best to protect the physical, emotional, and social well-being of all children.

 

Objective of the Book
The proposed edited book covers the primary topic of P-12 school safety and the use of technology and technology used for fostering an environment in which all students can be academically successful and thrive as global citizens.  School safety is defined as the physical, social, and emotional well-being of children. The book will comprise empirical, conceptual and case based (practical application) research that craft an overall understanding of the issues in creating a “safe” learning environment and the role technology can and should play; where a student’s well-being is valued and protected from external and internal entities, equitable access is treasured as a means for facilitating the growth of the whole student, and policy, practices, and procedures are implemented to build a foundation to transform the culture and climate of the school into an inclusive nurturing environment.

Target Audience
The target audience is leadership and education scholars, leadership practitioners, and technology coordinators.  This book will be used as a collective body of work for the improvement of K-12 schools and as a tool for improving leadership and teacher preparation programs. School safety is a major concern for educators.  Technology has played a role in creating unsafe environments for children; however it also is an avenue for addressing the challenges of school safety

Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

Section I – Digital Leadership

  • Technology as a Climate and Cultural Transformation Tool
    • School Leadership in the Digital Age: Building a Shared Vision for all Aspects of Learning and Teaching
  • Ensuring Equity within a “One to One” Technology Framework
    • Infrastructure within Communities
    • Accessible WiFi for Low SES Students
    • Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy
  • Professional Development for School Leaders

Section II – Well Being

  • Social Media and School Safety: Inputs and Outputs
    • Tip lines: Crime, Bullying, Threats
    • Communication and Transparency
    • Platform for Social Justice
  • Teaching Strategies to Promote Healthy Student Interactions in Cyberspace (Digital Citizenship?)
    • Building Capacity and Efficacy, Platform to lower incidence of Cyber-Bullying, Boosting Instructional Engagement
  • Literacy and Preparedness for the Influence and Consequence of Digital Media Marketing Campaigns directed toward Children, Adolescents, and Teens.
  • Pioneering Innovative Technology Program in Curriculum: Fostering “Belonging” beyond Athletics & Arts.

Section III- Infrastructure Safety

  • Campus/Facility Safety and Security
    • Rural Schools vs. Urban Schools
    • Digital A/V Systems
    • Background Check – Visitor Registration (i.e. Raptor)
  • Network Security Systems and Protocols
    • User Filtering and Monitoring
    • Firewalls
  • Policy
    • Appropriate use policies
    • Digital Citizenship
    • Web development policy
    • Privacy
    • Intellectual Property & Copyright

Section IV – Academic Success

  • Professional Development for Classroom Teachers
    • Pedagogical Integration of Technology
    • Instructional Coaching for Student Engagement
    • Increase Rigor with Technology
    • Competence in the Blended/Hybrid/Flipped Classroom
  • Technology to enhance learning for all
    • Assistive Technology
    • Accessibility issues
    • Internet access for Low SES Students in the Blended/Hybrid/Flipped Classroom
  • Personal Learning Design
    • Differentiation for Student Efficacy
    • Strategies for Increasing Depth of Knowledge
    • Design Qualities for Enhanced Engagement

Submission Procedure
Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or before February 12, 2019, a chapter proposal of 1,000 to 2,000 words clearly explaining the purpose, methodology, and a brief summary findings of his or her proposed chapter. Authors will be notified by March 12, 2019 about the status of their proposals and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by June 12, 2019, and all interested authors must consult the guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. See Edited Chapter Template. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

Note: There are no submission or acceptance fees for manuscripts submitted to this book publication, Leveraging Technology for the Improvement of School Safety and Student Wellbeing. All manuscripts are accepted based on a double-blind peer review editorial process.

All proposals should be submitted through the eEditorial Discovery®TM online submission manager. USE THE FOLLOWING LINK TO SUBMIT YOUR PROPOSAL.  https://www.igi-global.com/publish/call-for-papers/call-details/3709

Publisher
This book is scheduled to be published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), an international academic publisher of the “Information Science Reference” (formerly Idea Group Reference), “Medical Information Science Reference,” “Business Science Reference,” and “Engineering Science Reference” imprints. IGI Global specializes in publishing reference books, scholarly journals, and electronic databases featuring academic research on a variety of innovative topic areas including, but not limited to, education, social science, medicine and healthcare, business and management, information science and technology, engineering, public administration, library and information science, media and communication studies, and environmental science. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.igi-global.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2020.

Important Dates
February 12, 2019: Proposal Submission Deadline
March 12, 2019: Notification of Acceptance
June 12, 2019: Full Chapter Submission
August 10, 2019: Review Results Returned
August 10, 2019: Final Acceptance Notification
September 7, 2019: Final Chapter Submission

Inquiries can be forwarded to
Dr. Stephanie Huffman
University of Central Arkansas
steph@uca.edu or 501-450-5430