Tag Archives: Publishing

International Journal of Distance Education Technologies (IJDET)

The International Journal of Distance Education Technologies (IJDET, an EI journal) is a forum for researchers and practitioners to disseminate practical solutions to the automation of open and distance learning. Targeted to academic researchers and engineers who work with distance learning programs and software systems, as well as general users of distance education technologies and methods, IJDET discusses computational methods, algorithms, implemented prototype systems, and applications of open and distance learning. All manuscripts submitted to the journal are peer-reviewed according to the procedure consisting of initial review, peer review, and recommendation.

 

Call for Papers of Special Issue:

Useful Links:

Useful Links for preparing and proposing a Special Issue:

Useful Links for Authors preparing and (re-)submitting a manuscript:

Useful Links for Authors whose manuscripts have been accepted (with required revisions) for publish:

    • Image Guide for preparing the TIFF images of your final package

Advances in Library Administration and Organization Critical Librarianship and Library Management

Call for proposals

Publication due 2020

Series Editor: Samantha Hines, Peninsula College

Volume Editor: David Ketchum, University of Oregon

 

The critical librarianship movement has shone light on many aspects of our profession and encouraged us to question why we do things the way we do them. One area underexplored in this moment, however, is library management: Are there management practices that need to be questioned or interrogated? Are there progressive practices that have not received the recognition they deserve?

 

ALAO seeks submissions for the “Critical Librarianship and Library Management” volume that delve beyond examples and case studies to critically examine library management.

 

Proposals in the following areas would be of particular interest:

  • Implicit bias and library management/operations
  • Retention and hiring for diversity and inclusion
  • Social justice in library leadership and management

 

This will be the first volume of Advances in Library Administration and Organization (ALAO) to publish in 2020.

About the Advances in Library Administration and Organization series:

ALAO offers long-form research, comprehensive discussions of theoretical developments, and in-depth accounts of evidence-based practice in library administration and organization. The series answers the questions, “How have libraries been managed, and how should they be managed?” It goes beyond a platform for the sharing of research to provide a venue for dialogue across issues in a way that traditional peer reviewed journals cannot. Through this series, practitioners glean new approaches in challenging times and collaborate on the exploration of scholarly solutions to professional quandaries.

How to submit:

We are currently seeking proposals for the 2019 volume on Critical Librarianship and Library Management. If you are interested in contributing to this volume, please send a proposal including a draft abstract of 500 words or less, author details and estimated length of final submission to Samantha Hines at shines@pencol.edu by August 31, 2018.

Submission deadlines:

 

Submission deadline for proposals: August 31, 2018

Notification of acceptance sent by: October 31, 2018

Submission deadline for full chapters: February 28, 2019

Comments returned to authors: April 30, 2019

Submission deadline for chapter revisions: June 15, 2019

 

International Journal of Technology-Enabled Student Support Services (IJTESSS)

Editor-in-Chief: Purnendu Tripathi (IGNOU, India) and Siran Mukerji (IGNOU, India)

Submission Link: https://www.igi-global.com/submission/submit-manuscript/?jid=202752

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Submission of papers- April 10, 2018
  • Notification-May 10, 2018
  • Camera ready-June 10, 2018
  • Registration-June 15, 2018
  • Conference Dates-June 25-27, 2018

 

Introduction  The International Journal of Technology-Enabled Student Support Services (IJTESSS) presents, analyzes, shares, and collaborates ideas, experiences, research studies, and cases on the advancements, innovations, and implementations of technology in student support services covering the entire gamut of education ranging from formal learning to informal learning, including childhood education, tertiary education, vocational education, open and distance education, and skill development and competency enhancement. Targeting educational planners, administrators, researchers, educational technologists, educational specialists, and marketing educators, IJTESSS attempts to create a networked approach of synergy between technology and student support services and its management for sustainable educational development and competency enhancement. In addition to full-length research papers, this journal publishes insightful books reviews and case studies on educational institutions and their techno-management initiatives for the management and administration of support services for students at all levels/stages of education.

Invitation The Editors-in-Chief of the International Journal of Technology-Enabled Student Support Services (IJTESSS) would like to invite you to consider submitting a manuscript for inclusion in this scholarly journal. The following describes the mission, coverage, and guidelines for submission to IJTESSS.

Mission  The mission of International Journal of Technology-Enabled Student Support Services (IJTESSS) is to provide an international forum for technological innovations and its related applications for effective student support services and its management and administration in all the segments/stages of education (formal as well as non-formal), including, but not limited to, early childhood education, school education, K-12 education, higher education, online, distance, and continuing education. The purpose of the journal is to cover diverse socio-economic, geographic, and differential cultural perspectives under the overall mandate of the application of technology in student centric support services in the diversified fields of education and learning. This journal publishes scholarly articles on the latest findings in technology and its application for student support services.

Coverage

The journal invites research papers and case studies on technological dimensions of student support services covering the different stages for formal and non-formal education including vocational education, Online and Distance Education. Topics include, but are not limited to the following:
• Student Recruitment, Development, Retention and Assessment • Student Life Cycle Management • Support Services for International Students • Online Learning and Student Support • Integrated Virtual learning Environment and Support Services • Technology driven Support Services for Learners with Special Needs • Advertising and promotion of academic programs and Student Support Services • Digital Support Services and Education • Technology and Support Services for In Campus and Off Campus Students • Direct marketing of educational programs • Education product management • Educational and allied services marketing • Educational branding • Educational institution corporate identity • Educational product management & and differentiation • Open and Distance Learning Support Services  • Skill Development and Competency Enhancement Support and Services • Vocational Education and Student Support • Ethical issues in the Student Support Services • Globalization and Student Support • Innovations in technology for Student Support • Interactive technologies for marketing of Support Services • International partnership and franchising  • Management of technology and marketing-led change in education • Market segmentation and Education Support • Network marketing of educational institutions • Quality, gaps analysis, and Grievance Redressal in institutional support services • Role of technology in promotional mix and education • Societal marketing and educational Support • Strategic collaboration and transnational Student Support Services • Student as customers and institutions as corporate houses • Academic program life cycle management and Student Support • Educational services and its marketing • Student Support towards sustainable educational development • Students Relationship Management • Technology enhanced Educational Partnership • Quality assurance in educational programs and support services • Technology for transnational partnership and collaboration in education • Educational partnership management • Technology in educational program development • Technology in services marketing of education • Transnational strategies for Student Support Services • Trademark of academic programs and Support Services • Virtual Student Support Administration

 

Submission

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit their original empirical research articles 3,000–10,000 words in length. Interested authors must consult the journal’s guidelines for manuscript submissions at http://www.igi-global.com/publish/contributor-resources/before-you-write/ prior to submission. All submitted articles will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis by no fewer than 3 members of the journal’s Editorial Review Board and 1 Associate Editor. Final decision regarding acceptance/revision/rejection will be based on the reviews received from the reviewers and at the sole discretion of the Editor-in-Chief.
All manuscripts must be submitted through the E-Editorial Discovery™ online submission manager. Please see the link at the bottom of this page.

Inquires

https://www.igi-global.com/submission/submit-manuscript/?jid=202752

Currents in Teaching and Learning

Currents in Teaching and Learning, a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars across the disciplines, welcomes submissions for its Fall 2018 and Spring 2019 issues (Volume 10, Numbers 1 and 2).  We consider all submissions that address new approaches to theories and practices of teaching and learning.
 

Each year we release two issues of Currents, an open-ended Fall issue and a themed issue in the Spring.  We welcome all teaching and learning-related submissions for the Fall Issues.

The theme for the Spring 2019 issue is “Globalizing learning.” With the intensifying clash between nationalism and globalization, the issue of how to incorporate consciousness of global issues and trends into college education has become ever more critical.  For this issue, we invite submissions that address this issue from theoretical and/or practical perspectives. Some questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to): 
·       What constitutes “global learning”, and what implications might this have for the nature, substance, content, and methods of tertiary education? 
·       What kinds of approaches can be used to integrate global knowledge and skills into teaching and learning across the disciplines? 
·       In what ways can global and local forms of knowledge construction be related in classroom and extra-curricular modes of teaching and learning?  

Looking ahead, the theme for the Spring 2020 issue is “Digital Pedagogies.” With their proliferation, diversification, and ever-growing importance in students’ lives, digital technologies present a limitless horizon of opportunities and challenges for educators.  As emerging technologies disrupt established spaces, dynamics, and institutions of learning, it becomes ever more urgent for instructors to reflect critically on how to incorporate digital tools and mediums into pedagogical practices.         

Some questions that might be addressed include (but are not limited to): 

  • How do digital technologies inform issues of accessibility, inclusiveness, and diversity in higher education?
  • In what ways do digital pedagogies shape or reshape dynamics, structures, and hierarchies that are embedded in the academic learning environment? 
  • Are there strategies and concepts that can guide instructors in aligning the bewildering array of emerging technologies with fundamental principles of rigorous learning?
  • How do we pedagogically navigate the intersection of digital media and information literacy?
  • Are there demonstrably effective ways to integrate face-to-face with digital learning environments?
  • What considerations should inform the selection and use of digital technologies in online, hybrid, and/or course design?

Submissions may take the form of:
·      Teaching and Program Reports: short reports from different disciplines on classroom practices (2850-5700 words);
·      Essays: longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today (5700 – 7125 words);
·      Book Reviews: send inquiries attn: Kisha Tracy, Book Review Editor. No unsolicited reviews, please.

We welcome both individual and group submissions.  All submissions must be original, previously unpublished work and, if based in a particular academic discipline, must explicitly consider their relevance and applicability to other disciplines and classroom settings.

Submissions Deadlines:
Fall 2018 issue: August 15, 2018
Spring 2019 issue: December 15, 2018

Submissions received after these dates will be considered on a rolling basis and for the following issue.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a peer-reviewed electronic journal that fosters non-specialist, jargon-free exchanges among reflective teacher-scholars. Published twice a year and addressed to faculty and graduate students across the disciplines, Currents seeks to improve teaching and learning in higher education with short reports on classroom practices as well as longer research, theoretical, or conceptual articles, and explorations of issues and challenges facing teachers today.

For essays and teaching and program reports, send all inquiries to Editor Martin Fromm at currents@worcester.edu.  For book reviews, send all inquiries to Book Review Editor Kisha Tracy at ktracy3@fitchburgstate.edu. For submission guidelines, visit our website at www.worcester.edu/currents.

Currents in Teaching and Learning is a publication of Worcester State University, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA.   ISSN: 1945-3043

Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

“We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL Publications book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of fall 2019. Chapter proposals are due August 1st, 2018. Read the full Call for Proposals, including a book chapter template, at: http://bit.ly/HiddenArchitectBook

More about the book: Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in academic libraries. We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share their experiences. Each case study chapter will detail definitions and missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures, prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make programs work. By using a case study template we will help identify commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through.

If you have any questions, please contact us at hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Information Literacy Coordinator, Cal State Dominguez Hills

Elizabeth Galoozis, Head of Information Literacy, University of Southern California

Rebecca Halpern, Teaching & Learning Services Coordinator, The Claremont Colleges”

 

Preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies

Call for book chapters on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies: book to be published by Rowman and Littlefield in 2019

This is a call for book chapters that focus on the preservation and advancement of indigenous and marginalized communities through the creative use of digital technologies. While it is expected contributing authors will come primarily from memory institutions (archives, museums and libraries), contributors from academic and non-profit organizations are also welcome.  Essay may address theoretical issues, scholarly research or case studies at the authors’ institutions.

Please send a one-page abstract to Marta Deyrup  Marta.Deyrup@shu.edu by September 17th.

Do not hesitate to contact me if you would like more information or would like to discuss your ideas in advance.

 

Dr. Marta Deyrup

University Libraries

Seton Hall University

Marta.deyrup@shu.edu

Web: https://works.bepress.com/marta_deyrup/

 

Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought

The Journal of Interdisciplinary Feminist Thought, a peer-reviewed open access journal (https://digitalcommons.salve.edu/jift/) published through Salve Regina University annually since 2005, invites contributions for its next issue: Women and Politics: Obstacles & Opportunities.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: August 31, 2018

Women and Politics: Obstacles & Opportunities The equal participation of women in politics and government is all important for the successful functioning of vibrant democratic communities in which both women and men can thrive. However, the history of women in American politics tells a story which differs from that reality. Prior to the beginning of the 21st century, women were outsiders in the world of politics, including voting, holding elective office, and serving on juries. Since that time, they have made significant gains. In fact, over the last few decades, women have made progress in political participation in all aspects of political life, although not equally. In the upcoming issue of the journal, we wish to focus on those obstacles and opportunities which have, or may not have, contributed to women’s equal political participation.

Possible Topics:

*         Obstacles-Discrimination by gender, race, ethnicity, social class, and/or religion.
*         Family responsibilities, educational achievement, and cultural norms.
*         Opportunities- changes in law and cultural expectations, public support.
*         Vision of future possibilities for the equitable participation of women in politics.

Submit all manuscripts, electronically, to co-editors:

Dr. Carol Shelton, cshelton@ric.edu<mailto:cshelton@ric.edu>
Dr. Virginia Walsh, R.S.M., walshv@salve.edu<mailto:walshv@salve.edu>

Each manuscript must include:

*         a title page
*         abstract
*         contact information listing:
*         the name of the author(s),
*         institution
*         telephone number
*         email address for all authors.

Please include the home and work address for the corresponding author.

Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures, Practices, and Contexts

​​​​​We are soliciting chapter proposals for our forthcoming ACRL Publications
book, Hidden Architectures of Information Literacy Programs: Structures,
Practices, and Contexts with an anticipated publication date of fall 2019.
Chapter proposals are due August 1st, 2018. Read the full Call for Proposals,
including a book chapter template, at: http://bit.ly/HiddenArchitectBook

More about the book: Information literacy (IL) is a well-established goal of
academic libraries, yet so much of the day-to-day work of running and
coordinating information literacy programs is absent from professional
literature, job descriptions, and library school coursework. While the
definition of a program is a coordinated set of activities in service of a
specific purpose, what those activities actually consist of – and who is
responsible for them – is highly dependent on institutional and interpersonal
contexts. Furthermore, while skills and competencies for leadership in LIS are
well-researched and articulated, those required for effective program
management, particularly indirect management of others, are not as well-
represented. This book will gather program examples to make visible the
structures, practices, and contexts of information literacy programs in
academic libraries. We are seeking chapters from academic librarians who
identify as a leader of an information literacy program who want to share
their experiences. Each case study chapter will detail definitions and
missions, allocation of resources and labor, supervisory structures,
prioritization approaches, and other processes and structures required to make
programs work. By using a case study template we will help identify
commonalities and differences across all types of programs and institutions
while allowing individual stories and unique contexts to shine through.

If you have any questions, please contact us at
hiddenarchitecturesbook@gmail.com to discuss how your idea may fit within this book’s scope.

Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations

Call for Chapter Proposals

Working Title: Deconstructing Service in Libraries: intersections of identities and expectations
Editors: Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby
Submission Deadline: July 15, 2018
Publisher: Library Juice Press

Note: We use the term librarian in this call, but we do not mean to limit submissions to those with an MLS degree. All library workers are encouraged to submit chapter proposals.

Book Description


Research into the construction of librarians’ professional identities indicates a strong emphasis on our work as service providers, from both within the profession and the larger environment in which we exist. When taken to its most extreme conclusion, the service ethos that informs librarianship can turn into what some some in the field informally refer to as “Handmaiden Syndrome”– the expectation that librarians be at the beck and call of faculty, students, patrons, and administrators. This is most visible in traditional, patriarchal constructions of service that rely on hierarchical power structures, such as those present in academia and other educational and cultural institutions. But Roma Harris argues that librarianship has the potential to transform the ideal of service from one that exploits those in service roles toward a more democratic and potentially empowering exchange. To do so means an acknowledgement of the high level of emotional labor on the part of the librarian, who is constantly negotiating her sense of personal worth and professional value in pursuit of “good service.” It also raises questions about what components of identity we ignore or devalue when focusing on service as a defining feature in our profession.

This book will unpack the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, and ability combine with an “ethic of service” to create, stagnate, or destruct librarians’ professional identities, sense of self, and self worth. We would like to examine the power structures, values, and contexts that influence our personal, professional, and institutional conceptions of service in libraries, as well as the costs and consequences (to ourselves and our institutions) of these very personal identity negotiations.

Possible Topics

Possible topics include but are not limited to the following:

Section 1: Situating Service in Librarianship
This introductory section will include a history of service values and behaviors in librarianship. It will examine the ways in which this value has been internalized by practitioners without a clear, agreed upon definition across the different subfields of librarianship.

Section 2: Intersecting Identities & Service
This section will include contributed chapters on the intersections of the ethos of service and personal identity. Questions explored may include:

• How do librarians’ personal identities influence their conception of service in libraries?
• What does service in libraries mean to you?
• In what ways do gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, and/or ability influence service expectations of librarians; the ways in which service is performed/carried out; and the ways in which service is perceived by others?
• How do definitions and expectations of service shape professional identities of librarians?
• What are the consequences of not meeting service expectations? How do these consequences differ based on personal identities?
• What is the role of power in service roles and how is influenced by intersectional identity?

Section 3: Reworking the Concept of Service in Libraries
This section will attempt to redefine the concept of service in libraries through a variety of critical theoretical lenses. Contributed chapters may, for example, rework service through a feminist, critical race, or critical disability framework. We also welcome theories and perspectives from other fields. Questions explored may include:

• Do we need a new shared definition of service in libraries?
• Should we abandon the ethos of service in libraries altogether?
• If so, what other professional values should take precedence?
• How can service be redefined to promote a critical, just, and inclusive work and patron environment in libraries? Can it do this?

A variety of traditional and nontraditional scholarship methods are welcome, including but not limited to rhetorical analysis, critical analysis, lyric scholarship, autoethnography, ethnography, phenomenological research, interviews, and other methods of exploring personal and collective identity and the ethos of service.

Timeline
• CFP distributed: April 2, 2018
• Deadline for Chapter Proposals: July 15, 2018
• Notification of Accepted Chapter Proposals: October 1, 2018
• First drafts due: January 15, 2019
• Second drafts due: March 15, 2019
• Final drafts due: June 1, 2019
• Editing: June-August 2019
• Submission of final manuscript: September 1, 2019

Submissions

Please email abstracts of up to 500 words to serviceinlibrariesbook@gmail.com

Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter examines the ethos of service in libraries in relation to identity, and/or a larger theoretical framework. You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts about different possible topics. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 2000-5000-word range. Abstracts that discuss service in tribal college libraries, HBCUs, Hispanic-serving institutions, community colleges, archives, special libraries, and libraries outside the United States are especially welcome.

Please direct any questions to Veronica Arellano Douglas and Joanna Gadsby, editors, at varellano@gmail.com or jogadsby@gmail.com.

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook

Dear colleagues,

Please consider submitting a chapter proposal to the forthcoming book The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook (to be published with ACRL Publications in 2019). Below is a more detailed description of the topic. Proposals are due July 16th. The call is also available at https://bit.ly/2JNtqNY. And please pardon any cross-posting!

 

Thank you for considering a contribution!

Sarah Morris

 

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Critical Thinking About Sources Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We’re looking for lesson plans or projects that support early college students in developing their critical thinking skills, with a particular focus on critical thinking about sources (ACRL Publications). We are seeking informative and approachable plans that librarians can implement to support undergraduate students in developing vital critical thinking skills that can help them succeed in college and beyond. Ensuring that students can not only identify different types of sources, but can also delve more deeply into how and why different types of sources are produced, can be a way to empower students with the skills they need to find, evaluate, and use information for a variety of purposes, in college and beyond.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the Cookbook format. Your 600-800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity that supports undergraduate students in developing skills to help them think critically about sources. Please also include:

  • Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)
  • Your name, university or other affiliation
  • Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)
  • Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

 

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to acrlcritsources@gmail.com by July 16, 2018

Notifications will be sent out in August 2018

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2018

Cookbook categories:

Section I: Consuming Information

Recipes here will concentrate on identifying and evaluating different types of information with a focus on popular vs. scholarly sources, evaluating information, and recognizing and dealing with misinformation.

Part I: Scholarly Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying scholarly sources
  • Peer review
  • Searching for scholarly sources
  • Understanding the scholarly publishing process

Part II: Popular Sources

Examples include:

  • Identifying popular sources
  • Understanding how different popular sources are published
  • Distinguishing between popular and scholarly sources

Part III: Evaluating Sources

Examples include:

  • Revamping the CRAAP test
  • Tools, resources, and activities to help students evaluate sources
  • Games for evaluating sources
  • Detecting and understanding bias

Part IV: Misinformation

Examples include:

  • Fact checking activities
  • Understanding what misinformation is and what forms it can take
  • Recognizing misinformation
  • Strategies for reading and consuming information online

Section II: Producing and Distributing Information

Recipes here will concentrate on helping students better understand how and why different types of sources are produced and how they can produce and use information. Recipes will focus on technology and tools, production and distribution techniques, and 21st century information ecosystems.

Part I: Means of Production

Examples include:

  • Synthesizing sources
  • Remixing sources
  • Producing content for specific audiences

Part II: Technology and Tools

Examples include:

  • Evaluating infographics
  • Creating infographics
  • Working with data
  • Working with social media tools

Part III: Information Distribution

  • Mapping activities to explore how different types of information are presented and interpreted in different forms of media
  • Visualizing information
  • Exploring algorithms

Part IV: 21st Century Information Ecosystems

Examples include:

  • Exploring funding models for different types of information and information outlets
  • Exploring advertising
  • Exploring the role of social media

Email acrlcritsources@gmail.com with any questions. Please refer to The Library Instruction Cookbook (ACRL 2009), The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), and The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Sarah Morris, Learning and Assessment Librarian, University of Texas at Austin