Love Your Body Week October 23-27

HealthWorks is hosting Love Your Body Week at University Park October 23 – 27. The week-long series of events is designed to encourage students to appreciate, nurture and respect their bodies. Students will have an opportunity to participate in Love Your Body table events including: create your own affirmation cards for yourself or a friend; take a KIND bar to spread KINDness; and tell us what you love about your body while posing for a picture with the “Inspire Hope, Empower Change” Instagram frame. Handouts and information will be available at each table with tips to improve body image as well as other Penn State resources and giveaways.  The Love Your Body tables will be on the ground floor of the HUB Monday 10/23 – Wednesday 10/25 from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.  Additionally, HealthWorks will have a Love Your Body table in the Intramural Building on Thursday 10/26 and Friday 10/27 focused on body positive reasons to exercise and ways to fuel one’s body.Tuesday night guest speakers Lindsay and Lexie Kite will share simple strategies for building body image resilience. They will share how the media and society are negatively impacting many people’s view of themselves and how we can counter the messages and improve our wellbeing.  The Kite sister’s presentation will take place at Freeman Auditorium in the HUB, on Tuesday, October 24th at 7pm.

Supplements vs. Food: Who Wins?

With multiple nutrition supplement chain stores opening in State College, many students may be wondering whether or not they should take supplements.  The number of protein powders and vitamin supplements on the market can definitely cause consumers to feel confused and overwhelmed. Don’t worry, a dietitian can help you to become a more informed consumer!

Many students find protein powders to be a fast and convenient source of nutrition. Whey protein, which contains branched chain amino acids, is a popular protein powder. However, supplements are not regulated by the FDA in the same way that food and medication are regulated. Supplements can be put on the market without any proof that they are safe or that they work. The FDA can remove the product from the market later if they deem it to be unsafe.  The good news is that animal and vegetable sources of protein can meet all of your protein needs. If your goal is to build muscle, be sure to get a variety of protein from foods like chicken, fish, lean beef, low-fat dairy, nuts, tofu and beans. Fast and convenient food sources of protein include individually packaged servings of tuna, chicken, chocolate milk, cheese sticks, peanut butter, hummus, and trail mix.  The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for protein is [0.8 x your body weight in kg = _____ g protein/day].

When it comes to vitamins and minerals, most people can meet their nutritional needs by eating a well-balanced diet. Researchers have found that fruits and vegetables have protective properties that prevent cancer, while vitamins supplements do not.

The bottom line: Real food is the best fuel source for your body, and most healthy people can meet all of their nutritional needs with food alone. Your energy levels are best when you eat a balanced diet, get adequate sleep, and exercise regularly. If you’d like more help with planning a healthy well-balanced diet, make an appointment with a dietitian by calling 814-863-0461 or by visiting the UHS website.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders — such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder – include extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding weight and food issues. They are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life-threatening consequences for females and males. In the United States, 20 million women and 10 million men suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life (NEDA).

Interested in learning more about eating disorders or do you want to learn proactive ways to foster a body positive environment? Visit the websites below:

Are you or someone you know struggling? There is a team of providers at Penn State who are dedicated to helping students who are struggling with eating disorders. Use the information below to make an appointment.

Healthy Eating and Living Support (HEALS)
University Health Services (UHS) Medical Appointments 863-0774
Nutrition Clinic 863-0461
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) 863-0395

Free Bike Safety Workshop

In association with Penn State’s Coming Out Week, Transportation Services, in partnership with the LGBTQA Student Resource Center, the Gender Equity Center, and Health Promotion and Wellness, is sponsoring a free bike safety workshop for women and the LGBTQA community on Tuesday, Oct. 10 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. The workshop will be held at 117 Weston Community Center at Penn State’s White Course Apartments.

Open to students, faculty and staff, as well as local community members (ages 18 and older), this workshop will teach participants the rules of the road and bike safety skills in a safe and inclusive environment. The workshop will also include an outdoor portion where participants will apply what they’ve learned on a beginner-friendly practice course at the Brown 11 parking lot. All participants must bring a bike and helmet to participate.

Following completion of the program, all participants will receive a free pair of Penn State bike lights.

For more information or to RSVP for the event, please email biking@psu.edu. Spaces are limited and RSVPs must be received by noon on Tuesday, Oct. 10. More information on Penn State’s Coming Out Week events can be found via the link below:

https://goo.gl/73kj3G

Eating in Season

Gardens and farmer’s markets are bursting with fresh fruits and vegetables this time of year.  Eating seasonal produce not only provides you the freshest fruits and vegetables but also contributes to sustainable practices.  Buying local produce means a decrease in transportation time and a corresponding decrease in CO2 production.  Eating seasonally often saves money as well because prices are lower when crops are in abundance.  Below is a seasonal chart showing the growing season for different produce in Pennsylvania.  The chart shows the months when the produce is available to purchase and eat.  The Downtown Farmer’s Market on Locust St. is Tuesday and Friday from 11:30 am – 5:30 pm. Check out the Healthy Eating tab for different ways to prepare many of these foods.

Health Promotion and Wellness offers individual wellness services

Health Promotion and Wellness is now offering free Wellness Services for students. The services are designed to help students increase knowledge and learn new skills that contribute to healthy behaviors and academic success.  Services are available for:

  • Financial Wellness
  • Healthy Relationships and Sexual Health
  • Nutrition/Healthy Eating
  • Physical Activity
  • Sleep
  • Stress (Relaxation and Time Management)

Each service includes three 1-hour sessions. Trained peer educators deliver the services. Students can schedule an appointment by calling 814.863.0461.  The services are located in the Wellness Suite, 20 Intramural Building.

Navigating the Dining Commons

Eating a healthy meal in the dining commons can feel overwhelming with all the choices.  You are offered an all you care to eat buffet as well as individual food stations.  How do you get started?

One helpful way to approach the dining commons is to first review the online menu.  If you plan ahead, you can make a healthier and balanced meal.  If you don’t have time to view the online menus ahead of time, use the MyPlate concept when approaching the food station.  For a balanced meal,fill  ½ your plate with fruits and vegetables, ¼ of your plate with grains and another ¼ of your plate with protein.  Don’t forget the healthy fats!

Look for the RHEAL program in the dining commons.    RHEAL stands for Residential Healthy Eating and Living.  This program is designed to help students identify foods that are healthier options.   Look for the sign with the carrot on it. For more information, click here RHEAL .

Tips for eating healthy in the dining commons:

  1. Check out the fresh fruits and vegetables at the salad bar
  2. Choose a whole grain for pasta, bread and rice
  3. Try other grains such as quinoa or farro
  4. Take a piece of fruit every time you leave the dining commons. (It will be a great snack for later!)
  5. Try other sources of protein including beans and tofu
  6. Add healthy fats to your meal from the salad bar such as nuts or olive oil as a dressing

Underage Drinking Decreases

A recent report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows a decline in binge drinking rates among young adults, ages 12-20 years old. The report indicates that 14% of young adults report binge drinking, down from 16%.  The data is from the annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health which was conducted with 67,500 Americans across a variety of ages.

The decline in binge drinking is an indicator of successful policy, community coalitions and enforcement. Frances M. Harding, Director of SAMHSA’s Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, emphasizes that prevention efforts must continue to ensure long-term progress (1). This is especially true given that it is a national priority to reduce binge drinking behavior among college students (2).

  1. https://www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/press-announcements/201706220200>
  2. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/leading-health-indicators/2020-lhi-topics/Substance-Abuse>

 

 

Eating Healthy: Dorm Edition

Claire Pomorski, a student in Nutrition 360 during spring 2017, created this awesome brochure full of valuable information to help students, living in the residence halls, make healthier food choices.  She highlights healthy food options in the Dining Commons, including getting Green 2 Go and healthy meal essentials found in the convenience stores.  She also includes meal ideas for breakfast, lunch, and dinner that can easily be made in a residence hall room.  Check it out below.