Category Archives: On Campus

See what’s new from the Health Promotion and Wellness department within University Health Services at Penn State University Park.

De-Stress at the Wellness Suite

Enjoy end-of-semester activities at the new Wellness Suite! Visit 20 Intramural Building for stress relieving activities this week. Tuesday, November 14th join HealthWorks and Healthy Penn State Ambassadors from 6-7pm to color and create your own trail mix as part of de-stressing before finals. On Wednesday, stop by the suite for game night 7:30-8:30pm. Bring your friends and enjoy an hour of fun. More activities scheduled for after break! Check in for updates.

Healthy living starts with you

Health Promotion and Wellness offers a 12-week weight management program for students.  Participants meet individually with a registered dietitian six times to discuss personal dietary and fitness goals.  Students with the following health needs are encouraged to enroll in the program:

  • Prediabetes
  • Diabetes
  • High Cholesterol
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Overweight/Obese
  • Metabolic Syndrome

This is a great time to start building healthy habits for life! Learn more by calling 814.863.0461 to make an appointment.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders — such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder – include extreme emotions, attitudes, and behaviors surrounding weight and food issues. They are serious emotional and physical problems that can have life-threatening consequences for females and males. In the United States, 20 million women and 10 million men suffer from a clinically significant eating disorder at some time in their life (NEDA).

Interested in learning more about eating disorders or do you want to learn proactive ways to foster a body positive environment? Visit the websites below:

Are you or someone you know struggling? There is a team of providers at Penn State who are dedicated to helping students who are struggling with eating disorders. Use the information below to make an appointment.

Healthy Eating and Living Support (HEALS)
University Health Services (UHS) Medical Appointments 863-0774
Nutrition Clinic 863-0461
Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) 863-0395

Free Bike Safety Workshop

In association with Penn State’s Coming Out Week, Transportation Services, in partnership with the LGBTQA Student Resource Center, the Gender Equity Center, and Health Promotion and Wellness, is sponsoring a free bike safety workshop for women and the LGBTQA community on Tuesday, Oct. 10 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. The workshop will be held at 117 Weston Community Center at Penn State’s White Course Apartments.

Open to students, faculty and staff, as well as local community members (ages 18 and older), this workshop will teach participants the rules of the road and bike safety skills in a safe and inclusive environment. The workshop will also include an outdoor portion where participants will apply what they’ve learned on a beginner-friendly practice course at the Brown 11 parking lot. All participants must bring a bike and helmet to participate.

Following completion of the program, all participants will receive a free pair of Penn State bike lights.

For more information or to RSVP for the event, please email biking@psu.edu. Spaces are limited and RSVPs must be received by noon on Tuesday, Oct. 10. More information on Penn State’s Coming Out Week events can be found via the link below:

https://goo.gl/73kj3G

Navigating the Dining Commons

Eating a healthy meal in the dining commons can feel overwhelming with all the choices.  You are offered an all you care to eat buffet as well as individual food stations.  How do you get started?

One helpful way to approach the dining commons is to first review the online menu.  If you plan ahead, you can make a healthier and balanced meal.  If you don’t have time to view the online menus ahead of time, use the MyPlate concept when approaching the food station.  For a balanced meal,fill  ½ your plate with fruits and vegetables, ¼ of your plate with grains and another ¼ of your plate with protein.  Don’t forget the healthy fats!

Look for the RHEAL program in the dining commons.    RHEAL stands for Residential Healthy Eating and Living.  This program is designed to help students identify foods that are healthier options.   Look for the sign with the carrot on it. For more information, click here RHEAL .

Tips for eating healthy in the dining commons:

  1. Check out the fresh fruits and vegetables at the salad bar
  2. Choose a whole grain for pasta, bread and rice
  3. Try other grains such as quinoa or farro
  4. Take a piece of fruit every time you leave the dining commons. (It will be a great snack for later!)
  5. Try other sources of protein including beans and tofu
  6. Add healthy fats to your meal from the salad bar such as nuts or olive oil as a dressing

Eating Healthy: Dorm Edition

Claire Pomorski, a student in Nutrition 360 during spring 2017, created this awesome brochure full of valuable information to help students, living in the residence halls, make healthier food choices.  She highlights healthy food options in the Dining Commons, including getting Green 2 Go and healthy meal essentials found in the convenience stores.  She also includes meal ideas for breakfast, lunch, and dinner that can easily be made in a residence hall room.  Check it out below.

Manage Stress 101

Everyone gets excited about returning to Happy Valley for the start of fall semester. As activities and classes get underway, it’s inevitable that your stress level will increase.  On the spring 2016 National College Health Assessment, 27% of undergrads at University Park said stress had a negative effect on their academic performance. To keep your stress in check here are a few tips:

Exercise. One of the best ways to manage stress and keep your body healthy is exercise. Physical activity increases endorphins, which are neurotransmitters in the brain that make you feel good (1). Exercise can also improve brain function so you feel and perform better in school (2).

Meditate. Try a yoga class or practice mindfulness exercises. Research shows that meditation can help reduce stress, depression and pain (3).

Take a Break. Read a book. Go for a jog or a walk. Watch TV or listen to music. The American Psychological Association recommends taking a 20 minute break if you are feeling overwhelmed by a situation or project (4).

Find your friends. Talking about your problems to a friend, sibling, or parent actually reduces stress (4). Talking to someone about what’s causing you stress can give you the social support you need to get through the problem.

These tips will help you reduce stress and may improve your mood and performance. Stay ahead this semester by managing your stress with a Mange Stress Workbook.

References:

  1. Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, April 16). Exercise and Stress: Get Moving to Manage Stress. Retrieved from: http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/exercise-and-stress/art-20044469
  2. Hillman, C. Erikson, K. Kramer, A. (Janurary 2008). Be smart, exercise your heart: exercise effects on brain and cognition.  Nature Reviews Neuroscience. Retrieved from: http://www.nature.com/nrn/journal/v9/n1/full/nrn2298.html?foxtrotcallback=true
  3. Corliss, Julie. (2016, December 14). Mindfulness Meditation May Ease Anxiety and Mental Stress. Harvard Heart Letter. Retrieved from: https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/mindfulness-meditation-may-ease-anxiety-mental-stress-201401086967
  4. American Psychological Association staff. (2017). Five Tips to Help Manage Stress. Retrieved from: http://www.apa.org/helpcenter/manage-stress.aspx

Outdoor Activities

When the sun is shining and you have a few free hours, check out these fun activities to get you moving:

  • Go for a walk- this is one of the simplest ways to be active and offers numerous health benefits. Maybe a nature walk is for you or maybe local streets are your thing. Here’s a campus map if you’re at Upark! https://sites.psu.edu/healthypennstate/files/2016/09/Campus-Run_Walk-Map-accessible-version-2gmv9mi.pdf
  • Kick your hiking up a notch and try out rock scrambling. This fun blend of hiking and rock climbing is a great total body workout that improves cardiovascular health, strength, and flexibility.
  • Grab a friend and a Frisbee and head outside for a light and fun workout. Disk golf may be your next favorite activity. Check it out! http://www.pdga.com/introduction
  • Go Kayaking, paddle boarding, surfing, swimming… the list goes on and on. If you live near water your options are endless. Check out Lake Perez at Stone Valley for boat rentals

For more fun activities and local outdoor events check out onlyinyourstate.com (1) to see all your state has to offer.

Check out Penn State Adventure Recreation for all of your adventure needs!

  1. Only In Your State | Discover What’s In Your Own Backyard. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/

Exercise is Medicine Earns Gold Status

Penn State’s Exercise is Medicine on Campus program (EiM-OC) recently received gold-level status from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). By actively implementing physical activity as a vital sign of health, Penn State EiM-OC was awarded gold level recognition at the World Congress meeting in May 2017 (1).

EiM-OC aims to improve the health and wellbeing of students and faculty through physical activity. The initiative encourages physical activity as part of everyday life and overall health.  At Penn State, EiM-OC initiatives include campus walks, push-up challenges, classroom presentations and promoting campus health services & fitness centers on social media. Every year in October, Kinesiology students and faculty spend a week at locations around University Park engaging the campus community in exercise and general physical fitness. The outcomes from the 2016 EiM week are available on Penn State’s EiM website (2).

Penn State EiM was founded in 2012 and awarded silver status in 2015 and 2016. Dr. Melissa Bopp, associate professor of kinesiology, and Zack Papalia, EiMOC coordinator, hope to reach even more students and increase the impact on the Penn State community in 2017-2018.

  1. http://www.exerciseismedicine.org/support_page.php/recognition-program/
  2. https://sites.psu.edu/psueim/eim-2016-outcomes/