Pilot Results of a Health Social Franchise in Kenya: Early Evidence of Sustainable Livelihood Creation

Katelyn Holmes, Stephen Suffian, Jeffrey Lackey, and Khanjan Mehta

Humanitarian Technology: Science, Systems and Global Impact Conference

Holmes, K., Suffian, A., Lackey, J., Mehta, K., “Pilot Results of a Health Social Franchise in Kenya: Early Evidence of Sustainable Livelihood Creation,” Humanitarian Technology: Science, Systems and Global Impact Conference, Boston, May 2014

Abstract

Mashavu: Networked Health Solutions increases access to pre-primary health services, provides personal health information tracking, and income-generation opportunities to women in rural Kenya. The aim of this paper is to explore the potential of Mashavu, a healthcare social franchise, to create sustainable livelihoods for its employees in rural Kenya. The research team conducted two pilots of the Mashavu system in a rural Kenyan community. While the initial pilot protected Mashavu Health Workers (MHWs) from the financial risks of taking a new service to the market, the second pilot removed employee income subsidies. The removal of subsidies after the conclusion of the first pilot led to a divergence in monthly wages for the MHWs. While one MHW retained consistent monthly income by increasing the number of days worked monthly and the number of clients seen, a second MHW retained a largely consistent schedule without significantly increasing the number of clients daily and experienced a 600 KSH (29%) decrease in monthly wages. Following a period of employee incubation from financial risk, the MHWs consistently involved in the program were able to continue to generate income through Mashavu.

 

Available from:

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/266261259_Pilot_Results_of_a_Telemedicine_Social_Franchise_in_Rural_Kenya_Evidence_of_Sustainable_Livelihood_Creation?ev=prf_pub

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