Folsom Street Fair

“The world is not divided into people who have sexual fetishes and people who don’t. There is a continuum of responses to certain objects, substances, and parts of the body, and few people can disregard these and still enjoy having sex.”

This quote from Pat Califia exemplifies fetishes and why we have them, and no fetish community is more prominent than the BDSM community, with its harrowing triple acronym (bondage & discipline, domination & submission, sadism & masochism) that includes most all fetish and kink acts. There is also no larger
BDSM fair than the Folsom Street Fair held in San Francisco. With the fair comes 400,000 visitors who are into all sorts of things, including leather, bondage, sadomasochism, drag, and petplay, to name a few.

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The Folsom Fair itself can be traced back to the origins of leather culture, which is a huge part of the BDSM community and one of the earliest communities for those into BDSM. Leather culture started in San Francisco in part because of the blue discharge, a discharge from military service for being gay. With these came multitudes of gay men who were dropped off in San Francisco and decided ‘why not just stick around.’ Among the areas that became popular among gay men in this early San Francisco, from the mid-40s on through the 80s were the Embarcadero and Folsom. By the 70s there were 30 different leather bars, leather clubs, and leather merchants on Folsom Street.

An extensive list of what each color and placement represents in hanky code

From this time the hanky code also originated, an excellent example of the structure that the leather community, and typically other kink communities, take on to communicate desires and rules. The hanky code is where someone has a colored hanky on their person, with the color and the placement indicative of what they are interested in, placement on the left meaning they are a top, and placement on the right meaning they are a bottom. Some common colors are red for fisting, grey for bondage, and black for s&m. Parallels can be drawn between this informal but almost official set of guidelines with Califia’s explanation of the guidelines the dictate public sex and turn it into more of a “quasi-public” act. Folsom can certainly be identified as quasi-public, as it occurs in the open but is confined to several blocks that are cordoned off so nobody just wanders in. To those inside Folsom though, everything is more public, which is part of the appeal of the fair. Being present at the fair is participation in some form, and as Justin Bond said in Shortbus, “voyeurism is participation.”

What is the appeal of Folsom and BDSM anyway? In Califia’s article “Feminism and Sadomasochism” she states that: “wearing leather, rubber, or a silk kimono distributes feeling over the entire skin. The isolated object may become a source of arousal. This challenges the identification of sex with the genitals.” Certainly appropriate, as the BDSM community deals with fetishes and fetishes by definition are sexual arousal towards something other than genitals. This erotic sensation that can be had from wearing leather and rubber underlies the BDSM community and the Folsom fair, with many participants wearing some or mostly leather and/or rubber. This challenge of arousal at the genitals also extends to other sub-categories of BDSM, most notably petplay. Petplay is a very common sight within Folsom, either very obviously, like wearing the gear that is involved in petplay, to more subtlety, like wearing a collar. Petplay also tackles on the idea of arousal and affection being directed at something other than the genitals. The arousal can come from the dominant and submissive roles that the two partners engaging in the act take on, it can also come from the intimate moments that are shared within the action. These moments also skew the classic sense of what is romantic and erotic by replacing verbal action with non-verbal action such as petting, holding, or stroking. Within this subset we can also find guidelines and rules established by the community, like collar etiquette. If one is wearing a collar, at Folsom or outside of it, one is assumed to have a partner. For those who like wearing collars but who do not have a partner or are not exclusive, having a collar with an open lock signifies this. Within this community and all the communities at Folsom rules and codes create an ordered environment where everyone can have safe and erotic fun.

Someone in full pony gear engages in an aspect of pony play at Folsom, pulling the dominant partner in a cart

Folsom stands out as a very intimate fair that challenges many norms. It is a BDSM fair that occurs outdoors, where many would consider such acts inappropriate. It also has a very large attendance which may contradict those who think that BDSM is a fringe thing and that fetishes are not common among people. The fair itself stands to challenge norms and it also establishes its own norms which is a wonderful thing in itself. On top of this all, the fair raises money for charity so head on out to it with your best leather and rubber gear because you are doing so for a good cause.

Don’t Hug Me .I’m Scared

DHMIS 3Directed by Becky Sloan and Joseph Pelling, Don’t Hug Me .I’m Scared is a short film series where the only thing you can expect is the unexpected. Making its YouTube debut in 2011, several years elapsed between the release of the first video and its sequels due to lack of funding. Stylized in the vein of contemporary children’s programming, the show employs the mediums of puppetry, animation, costume, and song. There are three primary characters but we never learn their official names: two are puppets – one a green bird and the other a yellow muppet-like fellow – and the third a human-sized individual costumed entirely in red with a mop-like face. For sake of clarity, I will refer to these characters as “Robin”, “Manny”, and “Harry” respectively. (These are the names the YouTube community appears to have agreed upon.)

loveEach show is centered on a particular theme (creativity, time, love, computers, and health, so far) and text magically emerges midair to introduce new concepts. These videos are not your standard educational programming, however. Innocuous at first, things quickly take a turn for the worst as the inanimate objects/animals that began talking to offer seemingly useful advice turn despot, their guidance becoming flawed and insidious.

RedBesides stating that the series aims to “teach the puppets the most important subjects of life” and to “save them from ignorance” in their crowd funding videos, its creators have offered little information in the way of clarification. As such, the YouTube community has taken the matter into its own hands. Broadly speaking, most fans of Don’t Hug Me .I’m Scared appear to be of the mindset that the show is meant to be a commentary on the dangers of children’s television, calling attention to the indoctrinating and proselytizing qualities of those programs. They don’t stop there, however. Determined viewers re-watch the videos over and again, seeking out “Easter eggs” that shed more light on the relationship between these characters and the context in which the events that transpire occur. Serious theorizing takes place in the comment section as viewers attempt to find logic in the chaos.

While I tend to agree with the notion that the series operates as a critique to children’s programming (and have attempted to posit a narrower explanation for the general proceedings), I think much of its value lies in its brazen inexplicability. Queering the normative, it turns everything we take to be true on its head by taking that truth to the absolute extreme. For approximately five minutes, this show barges into your quiet and comfortable life and just a quickly ends, leaving you reeling. Offering no explicit alternatives, its power lies in its ability to disrupt via the irrational. So it is perhaps pointless to even try to impose lucidity on it.

dinnerIt was only after viewing John Water’s Pink Flamingos that I came to think of Don’t Hug Me as relevant to this course. Like Water’s film, the series is rather dark in humor, capitalizing on the crude and warped. One might even say it’s campy, for it regales with its “embrace [of] the low, the bawdy, and the common”. Death and decay feature in some form in each video, fresh organs nonchalantly make appearances and are sometimes just as coolly consumed, and there is always blood. It is evident, as well, that the series appeals to only a certain range of people, for while the first video averaged 302,169 likes, a notable number of people – 20,154 – disliked it just as much. Could it be they were experiencing disgust?

As Berlant and Wportraiterner suggest, kinship and the notion of the couple are sites that queer culture can invert. In this series, there is no indication as to what binds Robin, Manny, and Harry besides perhaps friendship. They appear to live together (this supposition might be thrown into conflict with the emergence of episode five, however, as the kitchen is not the same as episode one) but are by no means a nuclear family as they vary in species and all present as male (this is only presumed on the basis of voice register).

When it comes to relationships episode three is by far the most notable, focusing on the concept of love. Upset by Robin’s killing of a butterfly, Manny takes off into the forest and soon finds himself greeted by yet another butterfly offering to share the gospel of love with him. Flying over a rainbow, Manny comes to the land of love where he learns that “everyone has a special one”. Monogamous and heterosexual, this love is “perfect” and “pure”, “protected with a ring”, and has “always been” this way. It is then revealed, however, that for Manny to experience this love, he has to pledge himself to Malcolm, the king of love, a giant head who must be fed gravel to be kept content. As the fellow love-goers share, it is also requisite that Manny changes his name, permits his brain to be scoured of certain thoughts, and forgets “about anything [he] ever knew”. Indeed, as this video suggests, there is ample evidence that heteronormativity is in fact a cult.malcolm2

Don’t Hug Me .I’m Scared: the surest and shortest path to WTF.

Check out the YouTube channel here

Alone (Maya Angelou)

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Maya Angelou is a poet and also a Grammy honored author known for her famous novel titled ” I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings”. A book that goes into discussing Angelou’s life from when she was younger up until she was about 17 years old. For those of you who may not already know, Angelou is also a civil rights activist. Maya Angelou became a writer and poet only after failing at a number of other jobs such as, Prostitution, nightclub dancer, and many other jobs. Maya is also known for her poetry. Some of which many people may know already like ” Phenomenal Woman” by the tone of the poem by saying “pretty women wonder where my secret lies. I’m not cute or built to suit a fashion model’s size. But when I start to tell them, They think I’m telling lies. I say, It’s in the reach of my arms, The span of my hips, The stride of my step, The curl of my lips. I’m a woman Phenomenally ,Phenomenal woman, That’s me”. which to me is basically saying just because she isn’t what most people consider beautiful doesn’t mean she isn’t attractive an unwanted. When she says. ” but when I start to tell them they think I’m telling lies it’s in the reach of my arms the span of my hips”. that alone shows that she doesn’t care what other people think or believe because she can prove them wrong.

Throughout many of Maya Angelou poems. You’ll go on to see that she uses a lot of imagery and metaphors. Angelou’s poems touches on her life, family, racism. The poem that I chose to discuss by Angelou is a poem called “Alone” which goes on to discuss how nobody should be alone which I feel relates to queer culture and an article by Adrienne Rich Titled Compulsory Heterosexuality and Lesbian Existence. In this article Adrienne discusses how women dreams of being with other women has been crushed due to the fact that a lot feminist haven’t discussed it. But does that mean that women that like woman show be alone or just settle because it isn’t what society perceives as the normal no. I feel as though if your happy then that’s all that matters, because if your living trying to make other people happy an not yourself than you are alone. If your somewhere where you aren’t happy than you are alone. To be alone doesn’t mean to be by yourself. But to me it’s also a feeling that society has made a lot of people feel.

Faking It

Faking It is a television show that first premiered on MTV in April, 2014. The show takes place mostly at and around Hester High School which is located near Austin, Texas. Unlike every other high school in America, at Hester High School being weird or abnormal is what lands you a seat atop the schools hierarchy of popularity. The show follows a series of main characters, all of which are struggling to not only gain or keep their rank of popularity, but are also struggling to identify their own personal selves throughout the tough journey we all undergo through high school. Throughout the series, the characters display several aspects that pertain to a lot of what we discuss in class, which is queer culture.

When the show begins, we are introduced to two of the main characters, Karma and Amy. They are sophomores at Hester High School and are also best friends. The dynamic duo is portrayed as being willing to do anything to gain a spot amongst the popular crowd. This aspect is tested when Shane Harvey, who is also a main character, accidentally assumes Karma and Amy are a lesbian couple, when in reality they are just best friends. Initially the pair’s reaction was to state that they were not actually a couple; however, when the two of them realized how popular they became from being known as Hester High School’s first out lesbian couple, they decide to hide their true identities rather than losing their new found popularity. Shane Harvey, the boy who ‘outs’ Karma and Amy is one of Hester’s most popular students and plays the role of an out and proud male student who loves unveiling the skeletons hiding in the closets of his fellow classmates. Later on in the series another main character, Liam Booker, who is Shane’s best friend ends up falling for Karma and throwing kinks in Karma and Amy’s attempt to keep their popularity by prolonging their charade of being a lesbian couple. As the series goes on, the show displays many of the struggles faced by students in high school. From Amy falling for her best friend Karma, to Karma falling for Liam and likewise for Liam himself, the show depicts the main characters as finding out tremendous amounts about themselves through the relationships and friendships which they experience throughout their encounters with their classmates. The last main character that is really of relevance to the aspect of queer culture is Amy’s step sister, Lauren Cooper. Lauren is initially depicted as the new girl who is quickly very popular but soon faces her own demons when she is ‘outed’ as being intersex.

I first began watching Faking It when the series first premiered on MTV. I related to the show and even though I found myself constantly thinking, “Wow, this would never actually happen in high school.” I could not help but to fall in love with the show because of the fact that the show handles a lot of issues and is not afraid to throw awkward situations into the audience’s face. The show not only handles issues such as Amy struggling to determine her own sexuality, but it also shows the struggles of Amy’s sister Lauren who is intersex. In many ways the struggles Lauren is depicted to have resonates with our classroom discussions of the struggles which members of the transgender community face. Though Lauren is intersex and not transgender, I found it interesting that she was depicted to suffer from such similar circumstances as those who brave the ridicule that is associated with being a member of the transgender community. Another aspect of the series that I found to be quiet interesting was that many of the struggles the characters where shown to go through made me think back to when we read Martha Shelley’s. “Gay Is Good.” I recall that she spoke about how one of the worst parts about being a homosexual was not the way that they are punished by law enforcement or by society as a whole, but the fact that those who identify as being homosexuals often believed that the fact that they as individuals identified as being gay was something that was not to be revealed. Martha Shelly basically states that it is the general knowledge that being a homosexual means that you are something that is so bad that is should not even be revealed or shared, and I feel that many of the characters in this series show characteristics of identifying with Martha Shelley’s statement. All of the main characters have resentment towards themselves because in some way or another they do not feel that who they truly are is someone or something that can be openly discussed. I feel that many of the characters are shown to  believe that who they are as people is something that they are ashamed to show others which as stated, is how Shelley talks about how it feels to be a member of the homosexual community. I love the manner in which the show depicts the struggles members of the LGBTQ+ community face on a daily basis and how it affects them as people, and I also love how much it pertains to the day to day discussions and readings we have for class.

 

Jack’d

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Apps like Grinder and Jack’d are gay apps that allow hookups to be easier. I will be focusing on the app called Jack’d throughout my post. I hope to show the connection between the increase in STI rates and how these apps aid in that increase. According to a news report by CNN syphilis grew by 79%, HIV infections grew by 33%, and gonorrhea also has increased by 30%. Rhode Island Department of Health has put the blame on these types of apps.

JAck’d is a app that allows you to connect with other gay guys for hookups. The app also allows individuals to make friends and build connections. Jack’d shows you how far or close you are to each other as well. With this app you also have to create a profile where people can read about you and see pictures.Rhode Islands Department of Health has also said that gay men dating through these apps are at higher risk for chlamydia and gonorrhea. A quote by Whitney Engeran saying that “Mobile dating apps are rapidly altering the sexual landscape by making casual sex as easily available as ordering a pizza.” I believe that with sex being so easily accessible it makes it easier to contract a STI. Even though the profiles are created to allow people to learn about their interest, not all users are honest. This causes people to trust people on these apps and have unprotected sex and contract these STI’s.jackdAppIcon-2x

http://ireport.cnn.com/docs/DOC-1281189

http://money.cnn.com/2015/05/26/technology/rhode-island-tinder-stds/

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3252570/Tinder-Grindr-dating-apps-increase-risk-chlamydia-gonorrhea-making-casual-sex-available-ordering-pizza.html

The Relevancy of HomoEroticism

Homoerotic is defined by Merriam-Webster Dictionary as: “marked by, revealing or portraying homosexual desires.” It is important to note that the concept of homoeroticism does not necessarily lead to acts of homosexuality. There is a very fine line between homoeroticism and homosexuality. Homoeroticism and homosexuality existed as far back as the ancient civilizations of mankind. They were well documented through paintings, sculptures, and scriptures from Ancient China 650 BCE, Ancient Persia, Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Greeks. Homoeroticism of the Ancient Greeks was introduced into mainstream media through shows as the television network STARS’ show Spartacus. For the purpose of this post, I will focus on the relevancy of homoeroticism as it is still as pertinent today as it was thousands of years ago.

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Many would argue that there are many different concepts to homoeroticism. I will argue that the two most important core concepts of homoeroticism are masculinity and the presence of a heterosexual man. Without these two core concepts, there won’t be such a thing as homoeroticism. My argument is further supported by JD Samson & MEN’s music video “Make Him Pay.” In this music video, the homosexual rhetoric is prevalent but it never crosses over to an act of homosexuality. There are images and scenes of bombs, explosion, soldiers, guns, fire, cops, mechanic, fighting, blood, muscle men, and contact sport; which is everything that is associated with masculinity. It is also important to note that although this music video is very homosexually suggestive, it never showed any men kissing or engaging in any forms of homosexual intimacies with each other.

The presence, no matter how little or how obvious, of a heterosexual man is needed for it to be homoerotic. As mentioned earlier, homoerotic is defined as “marked by, revealing or portraying homosexual desires” thus never mentioning anything about the actual sexual act of homosexuality. Contact sports, such as wrestling, are prime examples of the homoeroticism because it does not portray acts of homosexuality nor the pertinent sexual desire to be with that person of the same sex.

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The military is also a place where homoeroticism exists. The normative nature of the military is a very masculine environment that nurtures and bonds the camaraderie between men. That same nurturing and bonding might eventually lead to homoeroticism but NOT homosexuality. It is evident that the majority of men in the military are heterosexuals. As my time in the military, I can say that that same majority are the same ones expressing and involving themselves in more homoerotic situations than the actual gay men in the military themselves.

Homoeroticism existed for thousands of years and is still relevant in today’s culture and society. It is important that it is not to be confused with homosexuality because the two represent very different outcomes. In my opinion, the two core concepts that are important in homoeroticism are masculinity and the presence of a heterosexual figure. Homoeroticism will never disappear from society or human civilizations as it has lasted for over thousands of years. Though I do believe that the line between homoeroticism and homosexuality will eventually become thinner and thinner as we progress into the 21th Century.

 

 

Venus Boyz

Venus Boyz is a documentary film directed by Gabriel Baur in the 1996 New York City life. Various participants of the LGBT community showed a creative and insightful look into their everyday lives. This documentary showed Drag King and Queens in and out of their characters. These people opened up their sexual life, their family life, and a small glimpse into the inside of their beautiful realistic mind.

The following characters below are biological female:

Bridge Markland who is androgynous person plays Karl and Angela. Karl is a sweet, king and non violent man. Angela is sex bomb that radiates self confidence. Bridge lives in Berlin and expresses herself as a neutral person, not expressing either genders.

Shelly Mars is an aggressive female that expresses that personality as MO B Dick. Shelly has been a Drag King for 20 years and performs alongside other Drag Kings in the bar in New York City.

Mildred Gerestant is a person that does not categorize his/her gender. He/she says in the documentary “I’m not a Butch or femme. I just–whatever im feeling. I can be one way one day and another way the other. I just know it.” Mildred is a quite shy and to herself during her full time job as a computer analysis. But when she changes into Dred he becomes an erotic, lively man that says or does whatever he wants.

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Storme Webber knows Mildred as his “Granny”. Storme was born and raised with a lesbian mother and a bisexual African American father. For being exposed to the queer culture as a young girl, Storme developed the mindset to handle anyone looking at her/him through outlooks only through distinct race and gender. As a transgender he/she is drawn to identity indifference, it gives a sense of comfort. He/she express,

“And so with Masculinity its the same. Its what surrounds it you know, its this its always a, the dichotomy, its the moving forward and the holding back and the being vulnerable and this is what is interesting that’s what i find that makes any performance good passion.”

Diane Torr mostly enjoys portraying herself as male characters. In her previous years before drag she was was married and had a daughter. But she wasn’t happy with herself, and so she found something that made her feel comfortable, which was being a Drag King most of her every day life. She feels more respected and more confident living as a man and dating butch lesbians. She also explains the outlook on women,

“As woman its like were open for access 24 hours a day.

 

People have to like us. That’s like the ruling thing in our psy

ches. So what does it mean to be a woman? What kind of a woman am I? I want you to like me. I want you to hold me. I want you to fulfill my dreams.”

Judith Halberstam a gender theorist says:

“We don’t as individuals reinvent the meaning of gender. Each person individually, one person at a time. We, we come in to genders that have already being constructed for us within political, economic, social cultural context. So what we do, when we are in agenda is perform an already socially constructed script.”

All of these participants may not identify as a female in this documentary biut make no mistake,they love their genitals and do not want surgeries to permanently keep them from being a biological female. Not many people outside of the LGBT community such as myself knew their are Drag Queens and Kings, who are both fighting to break stereotypes given to them.

In class we discussed the comparisons and contrasts of Caityln Jenner and the character Moira in the move “Transparent”. Although Caitlyn does not perceive highly to some members of the transgender community, she still suffered in what every woman in the documentary has gone through; and that is being an outsider.Moira in the show does show authenticity and reliability which more transgender people can gravitate towards but it was just a character in a TV series. Desire, sexual orientation, body, romance have no gender identity labeled with only men and woman, but i feel only pure satisfaction and self acceptance to ones self.

 

Jin Xing: I don’t want the world to change me too much

Jin Xing is probably the most renown representative of the LGBT society in China. She entered the military’s dance troupe in ShenYang, China, at the age of 9. She was the first Chinese who received full scholarship from the United States and she came to New York to study modern dance. She then went to Europe, including rome, to travel and teach modern dance. In 1995, 26 years old Jin Xing decided to perform a sex reassignment surgery and become a woman. As a well-known choreographer and dancer, Jin Xing now owns her own dance company, her own talk show. She knows five languages and she is a wife, and the mother of three children.

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One unique thing about Jin Xing is that, she does not see herself as a transsexual, she see herself as a woman instead. She is successful not as a transgender, but as a person, a woman. People also do not refer her as a transgender woman. If you ask a Chinese about Jin Xing, I believe most of them will regard her as “the legendary female dancer and choreographer”, instead of “a successful transgender woman”. In contrast, Caitlyn Jenner, who just got the ESPY award, is still having an public image of a transgender. Jenner’s speeches, including her show “I am Cait”, emphasize on her process of becoming a women and how hard was it. During our discussion in class, many people said they think Caitlyn was really fake in her show. This is completely opposite with Jin Xing, who is also known as the “poison tongue” in China, because she only say the real words. Jin Xing Also, While Caitlyn Jenner is trying to influence the world of transgender people with her experience, Jin Xing is being a role model herself, as a transgender woman, who is a dancer, choreographer, a talk show host, and a talent show judge. Jin Xing is trying to influence the world by being successful while still being herself.

On the other hand, JinJXg Xing’s determination led to her success. At a young age, Jin Xing was determined that she wants to pursue a career as a dancer. She used hunger strike to persuade her mom to let her learn dancing. Being a transgender in China is definitely more difficult than in the U.S., especially at that time when Jin Xing did the surgery. Transgender was still kind of a taboo and being homosexual was a crime in China. Also, the technology was not that advanced. One has to be really determined to make this decision and to be willing to bear the consequence. An accident during the surgery almost paralyzed her leg and doctor told her she may never be able to walk again. However, she practice hard with her paralyzed leg and believed that she will be able to dance again, and she did.

Jin Xing is definitely one the most influential women in China. She has her own unique way when looking at things including politics and problems in China, and they are always presented in a humorous way in her talk show. Those are her personal ideas and she is speaking by heart. She said that, “I don’t want to change the world, but I also don’t want the world to change me too much. I just want to be myself.”JX2

Sex Lives of Cult Television Characters

In the essay, The sex lives of cult television characters, by Sara Gwenllian Jones, Sara focuses on the work of slash (male/male or female/female) fanfiction writers. Sara is a teacher of television and digital media at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. She also wrote a book called Cult Television, where she and other scholars examine show that are categorized as cult television to find defining characteristic to place them in this sub culture.

41WMNKJP2ZL._SX309_BO1,204,203,200_ (Book cover for Cult Television by Sara Gwenllian Jones)

This essay exemplifies the fact that cult television is a great basis of slash fanfiction.   The fact that in cult television literally anything can happen and be an acceptable outcome, spurs on fanfiction writers to the erotic relationships that are portrayed in most slash stories. The main writers of slash fanfiction are females, whom, aim to change normative gender constraints for males, to more emotional and sensual emotions that are generally found in romantic novels. With this shift to a more romantic/emotional man, this dictates a change in the masculinity and sexuality of men.

As stated by Marie-Laure Ryan in this essay in respect to fanfiction,

“Every act of reading constructs the text and actualizes its world in a different way”.

So in cult television, when an author writes a story, they open doors to allow for different worlds to be seen for that specific show. This then allows the characters to be portrayed in a different light, more specifically, to have slash relationships as a norm.

In this essay it makes a clear statement that with fanfiction, especially fanfiction of cult television, it allows the author to explore whatever they feel like. Whether it be objectively real or fake, right or wrong, true experiences or something they want to explore, what was once thought as myth and many other things, these are all acceptable things to see in fanfiction. This allows both the fans, who read the fanfiction, and the stories authors themselves to explore whatever desires they might have while still being connected to a character they already have a strong connection to.

In Audre Lorde’s, Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as a Power, she talks about how women use the erotic as a source of power for their unexpressed or unrecognized feelings.  In her essay she states,

“The erotic is a measure between the beginnings of our sense of self and the chaos of our strongest feelings. It is an internal sense of satisfaction to which, once we have experienced it, we know we can aspire. For having experienced the fullness of this depth of feeling and recognizing its power, in honor and self-respect we can require no less of ourselves”.

This relates perfectly to what these writers do when they write their stories.  Both writers and readers alike, search within their-self to what their desires are that they have yet to try out for whatever reason, and put their slash characters through it so people are able to experience it.  This then enables the writes and readers to know what they like and do not like specifically through characters in the cult television shows that they watch.