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CISCO Jabber Alert

08 Sept 2020

Cisco has released an advisory for a critical vulnerability affecting the Windows version of the Cisco Jabber unified communications client.  The latest version of the client is available at the Penn State Software Request site:

https://softwarerequest.psu.edu/Order/QueuelessOrder?productId=30&versionId=53

We advise that you update the Jabber client on all of your platforms (PC, Mac, Android, and iOS), if you have not already done so, in order to remain secure and to ensure that you have the latest feature set.

Please Note: If your department manages your device, they will need to take this action on your behalf.

ArtsIT will send out an update to all Penn State A&A computers this evening.

Cisco Jabber allows you to remotely receive calls on, and place calls from, your PSU office phone number and more. Visit the service website for more information on Cisco Jabber.

A&A Intranet

Resources for Faculty & Staff

DASHBOARD

 

The resourcefulness and resilience of the college is inspirational.

– B. Stephen Carpenter II
#MovingForwardTogether

Message from the Dean

(Posted 6/29)

In the current historical moment we are addressing increasing circumstances of social concern brought on by COVID-19 and racial injustice. As is the case for the rest of the University, in the college we are still working out details, asking questions, questioning answers, and piecing together responses on these fronts.

As you are aware, the University has announced plans to resume on-campus work and instruction in the fall. The announcement, “Back to State,” outlines guidance to date for resuming “on-campus, in-person classes and other activities this fall in a limited fashion.” Current guidance on teaching can be found on the “Keep Teaching” site, with other resources available on Penn State’s primary coronavirus website.

The goal of the University is to provide campus experiences and campus-based residential instruction for students in the fall, and the Back to State plan offers guidance on how to do so safely. The plan promises “a highly flexible mix of in-person, remote, and online instruction throughout the semester,” and the provision for a range of modes, including in-residence, hybrid, and remote instruction. The semester will begin August 24 and, regardless of the initial mode of instruction, all courses will shift to remote delivery following the Thanksgiving break. While all courses with enrollments of 250 and higher are mandated for remote delivery, there are courses with fewer than 250 students that will need to be offered in hybrid or remote/online modes. Guidance from the University is evolving on a daily basis as we ask more questions and make informed decisions accordingly.

From the onset of the remote teaching/remote working mandate, I have maintained a position that privileges the health and safety of faculty, staff, and students, and a commitment to not endanger the lives of the larger college community when we can do otherwise. As I have interpreted the University guidance for the college, instructors are in the best position to make decisions on the delivery mode of courses for fall semester based on their pedagogical and discipline-specific content knowledge. To do so, units will have to establish the standards that facilitate safe and pedagogically appropriate teaching and learning within their disciplines. Instructors can decide to teach on-campus as long as they are confident they are working in safe conditions and the course delivery mode is pedagogically sound. The guidance from the University provides information about maintaining social distancing, cleaning and sanitation, contact tracing, and enforcement of student behavior outside of class/off-campus, including mask-wearing. Even with this guidance, I know you have many questions.

I want to emphasize it is my position and that of the college leadership that instructors are in the best position to make decisions on the delivery mode of their courses in fall based on the current safety protocols and guidance on keeping themselves and students as safe as possible, as well as the most appropriate pedagogies to foster learning. The University plan is intended to minimize the risk of contracting COVID-19, yet instructors must weigh their own situation and determine what is best for them.

I support instructors teaching in classrooms or studios during COVID-19 only if they are comfortable doing so. In our college, this decision is informed by the approaches to teaching and learning that take place in studios, performance spaces, and other learning contexts, as well as conventional classroom spaces. At this point, I imagine most instructors have already communicated with their school director or department head about the delivery mode of their fall courses. Instructors who have not done so already should initiate a conversation as we need this information to work on room assignments to meet safe instructional guidelines.

It is possible some students will remain home while enrolled in their programs. I realize some instructors have raised questions about the rights of students to opt out of a residential mode of class delivery if they do not feel comfortable. Some students may request adaptations for health or travel restrictions. Instructors will need to make adjustments for students to access remotely the in-residence version of courses.

The University expects students will make progress toward their degree even if they are unable to be on campus and need to learn remotely. We anticipate more guidance soon about experiential learning, the kind of learning that takes place in many of our studio, design, and performance areas.

A phased University plan for returning to campus offices is in place. Employees in administrative and unit offices have been working on plans for their own safe return to the workplace. The position in the college is people who can work remotely should continue to do so. We are currently assessing how to address student-related service responsibilities and extra-curricular events such as advising, club sponsorship, and use of facilities outside of class.

Thank you for your efforts this past spring as we converted much of what we do into remote, virtual, and socially-distanced modes. The resourcefulness and resilience of the college is inspirational.
B. Stephen Carpenter II
#MovingForwardTogether

Message from the Dean (6/29)

(Posted 6/29)

In the current historical moment we are addressing increasing circumstances of social concern brought on by COVID-19 and racial injustice. As is the case for the rest of the University, in the college we are still working out details, asking questions, questioning answers, and piecing together responses on these fronts.

As you are aware, the University has announced plans to resume on-campus work and instruction in the fall. The announcement, “Back to State,” outlines guidance to date for resuming “on-campus, in-person classes and other activities this fall in a limited fashion.” Current guidance on teaching can be found on the “Keep Teaching” site, with other resources available on Penn State’s primary coronavirus website.

The goal of the University is to provide campus experiences and campus-based residential instruction for students in the fall, and the Back to State plan offers guidance on how to do so safely. The plan promises “a highly flexible mix of in-person, remote, and online instruction throughout the semester,” and the provision for a range of modes, including in-residence, hybrid, and remote instruction. The semester will begin August 24 and, regardless of the initial mode of instruction, all courses will shift to remote delivery following the Thanksgiving break. While all courses with enrollments of 250 and higher are mandated for remote delivery, there are courses with fewer than 250 students that will need to be offered in hybrid or remote/online modes. Guidance from the University is evolving on a daily basis as we ask more questions and make informed decisions accordingly.

From the onset of the remote teaching/remote working mandate, I have maintained a position that privileges the health and safety of faculty, staff, and students, and a commitment to not endanger the lives of the larger college community when we can do otherwise. As I have interpreted the University guidance for the college, instructors are in the best position to make decisions on the delivery mode of courses for fall semester based on their pedagogical and discipline-specific content knowledge. To do so, units will have to establish the standards that facilitate safe and pedagogically appropriate teaching and learning within their disciplines. Instructors can decide to teach on-campus as long as they are confident they are working in safe conditions and the course delivery mode is pedagogically sound. The guidance from the University provides information about maintaining social distancing, cleaning and sanitation, contact tracing, and enforcement of student behavior outside of class/off-campus, including mask-wearing. Even with this guidance, I know you have many questions.

I want to emphasize it is my position and that of the college leadership that instructors are in the best position to make decisions on the delivery mode of their courses in fall based on the current safety protocols and guidance on keeping themselves and students as safe as possible, as well as the most appropriate pedagogies to foster learning. The University plan is intended to minimize the risk of contracting COVID-19, yet instructors must weigh their own situation and determine what is best for them.

I support instructors teaching in classrooms or studios during COVID-19 only if they are comfortable doing so. In our college, this decision is informed by the approaches to teaching and learning that take place in studios, performance spaces, and other learning contexts, as well as conventional classroom spaces. At this point, I imagine most instructors have already communicated with their school director or department head about the delivery mode of their fall courses. Instructors who have not done so already should initiate a conversation as we need this information to work on room assignments to meet safe instructional guidelines.

It is possible some students will remain home while enrolled in their programs. I realize some instructors have raised questions about the rights of students to opt out of a residential mode of class delivery if they do not feel comfortable. Some students may request adaptations for health or travel restrictions. Instructors will need to make adjustments for students to access remotely the in-residence version of courses.

The University expects students will make progress toward their degree even if they are unable to be on campus and need to learn remotely. We anticipate more guidance soon about experiential learning, the kind of learning that takes place in many of our studio, design, and performance areas.

A phased University plan for returning to campus offices is in place. Employees in administrative and unit offices have been working on plans for their own safe return to the workplace. The position in the college is people who can work remotely should continue to do so. We are currently assessing how to address student-related service responsibilities and extra-curricular events such as advising, club sponsorship, and use of facilities outside of class.

Thank you for your efforts this past spring as we converted much of what we do into remote, virtual, and socially-distanced modes. The resourcefulness and resilience of the college is inspirational.
B. Stephen Carpenter II
#MovingForwardTogether

Notice Regarding External Communications

A&A faculty and staff should be advised that Penn State Strategic Communications is reviewing all public-facing (including student) messaging related to the campus closure/coronavirus. Amy Marshall (alm157@psu.edu) is coordinating this approval process. All new messaging must be sent to her for review prior to release.

A&A Pandemic Safety Officers (Posted 8/19)

Posted 8/19, 3:00pm

The following is a list of Pandemic Safety Officers for each unit:

Unit Primary Backup
College-Wide Katie Rountree, 814-777-6226, mkr10@psu.edu Lea Asbell-Swanger, 814-863-7101, ela1@psu.edu
Borland Admin Gwen Miller, 814-867-3122, gem15@psu.edu Katie Rountree, 814-777-6226, mkr10@psu.edu
Art History Catherine Adams, 814-865-3952, cda122@psu.edu Erica Nodell, 814-865-4873, exn30@psu.edu
School of Music Russell Bloom, 814-863-1118, rlb16@psu.edu Russell Bloom, 814-863-1118, rlb16@psu.edu
School of Theatre Carri Love, 814-863-6939, cxr906@psu.edu Chris Swetcky, 814-863-2593, cfs13@psu.edu
School of Visual Arts Matt Olson, 814-865-3982, mjo5165@psu.edu Jeremy Fisher, 814-865-6570, jhf149@psu.edu
Stuckeman School Jamie Behers, 814-863-7927, jlf47@psu.edu Diana Nolten, 814-865-5198, dbs115@psu.edu
Palmer Museum Jeremy Warner, 814-863-5232, jrw255@psu.edu Joyce Robinson, 814-863-9185, jhr11@psu.edu
Eisenhower/CPA Lea Asbell-Swanger, 814-863-7101, ela1@psu.edu Tom Hesketh, 814-863-7103, thh2@psu.edu

PPE Distribution Contacts:

College-Wide Primary Backup
125 Borland Building,
University Park PA 16802
Katie Rountree, 814-777-6226, mkr10@psu.edu Gwen Miller, 814-867-3122, gem15@psu.edu
Penn State’s Preparations for Fall 2020 (Posted 8/19)

Posted 8/19, 3:00pm

Q: How do I know if my building is safe?

A: Penn State’s Office of Physical Plant (OPP) has been gearing up for the return to campus by carefully evaluating all building mechanical and life safety systems to ensure that they are 100 percent functional and ready for occupancy. As part of its facilities evaluation and practices, OPP follows guidance from the PA Department of Health and the CDC and follows the recommendations of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

OPP has modified, where appropriate, how buildings operate to provide more ventilation, air flow and outdoor air being brought into buildings. Other steps include reviewing building records to determine current status and address any deficiencies in air distribution/air flow; maintaining indoor comfort with regard to temperature and humidity; transitioning to air filters that screen for fine particulate matter where the systems can handle it; and sponsoring UV disinfectant research for mechanical systems and exploring bipolar ionization systems that can deactivate harmful substances.

More information is available here.

Q: Are my responses in the Symptom Checker anonymous?

A: Penn State’s Symptom Checker is used to support personal wellness, by helping you make informed decisions about your health and the safety of others, in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. No identifying information/data is stored within the Symptom Checker. Penn State will only use and share your anonymized survey responses for trend analysis to inform COVID-19 response and mitigation efforts, to support the health and safety of our Penn State community. More information is available here.

Q: Are neck gaiters an acceptable type of face covering?

A: Multi-layer cloth masks or procedure masks are the preferred type of face covering. There is evidence that single-layer face coverings, including many types of neck gaiters, are not as effective in stopping respiratory droplets as multi-layer face coverings. At this time, it is recommended that all faculty, staff, and students wear a multi-layer mask or a procedure mask. All face coverings must cover the nose and chin, and masks with exhaust valves are not permitted.

You can read other FAQs related to Fall 2020 instruction on the Keep Teaching website’s FAQ page.

Latest News of Importance

  • Penn State students living on campus who were selected for pre-arrival COVID-19 testing will not be permitted to check in to their residence hall until they have received a negative test result from Vault Health. Students receiving positive test results will not be permitted to move in until they have completed their isolation period. Students who were selected for testing who did not complete a test will be advised via LionPATH that they will not be able to attend a class in person or participate in any on-campus activities until they complete the test.
  • Instructors can locate information about which software students can access from international locations on the Software at Penn State website.

Key Reminders

  • Are you curious about what in-person instruction will look like this fall? Watch this short video to see a realistic preview of how the guidance on the use of masks and personal protective equipment (PPE) in the classroom and on campus will be implemented. The video site also includes some helpful tips for teaching in a physically-distanced classroom and additional information on university policy and teaching strategies.
  • An Instructor Guide to Fall 2020 has been created to compile and organize COVID-related information for faculty. The guide distills available information ranging from protocols and policies governing health and safety, to technology and training resources, to best practices for instruction into a “one-stop shop” for instructors.
  • A “Countdown to Classes” toolkit, created by a group of Penn State teaching and learning experts, includes a flexible instruction guide, a two-hour webinar, and 25 virtual drop-in office hours. A full schedule is available here.
  • A new FAQ, published on Penn State’s “virusinfo” website, describes the difference between isolation and quarantine and the different time requirements associated with each.
  • Penn State has launched an integrated effort to remind faculty, staff, and students at all campuses and in adjacent communities of the importance of doing their part to limit the spread of COVID-19. “Mask Up or Pack Up” is a research-based campaign that is also launched in State College to create a seamless message for students and other members of the community.
  • In response to concerns about language in the Penn State COVID-19 Compact, language in the compact has been revised. Students returning to any Penn State campus must acknowledge the Compact as a condition of a return to learning on campus.
  • Students and employees who were selected for pre-arrival COVID-19 testing should initiate and complete their at-home saliva test immediately if they have not already done so.
  • The Penn State College of Nursing, in collaboration with Penn State Extension, is delivering an online course to educate participants on the basics of contact tracing. This non-credit, three-hour course is open to the public and prepares participants to support contact tracing in their local communities and organizations. There is a fee of $25 for participants who are not affiliated with the University. Register here.
  • Faculty can still submit questions related to Penn State’s plans for a return to classrooms in the fall. Questions may be submitted here.
  • Copious development and training opportunities are available to faculty in preparation for the Fall 2020 semester. Upcoming webinars for instructors at all Penn State campuses include:
    Wednesday, August 19: Canvas, Kaltura and Zoom: Enabling Continuity of Instruction

For More Information

To obtain comprehensive, updated information at any time, please review:

Important Resources

Teaching Resources + Policy Information

Student Support Resources

Employee Information

Communications

Stay Well/COVID Signage (Added 7/16)

Added 7/16, 12:00pm

A system of signage has been developed by Office of Physical Plant to help support the consistent use of COVID-19 signage across the Penn State’s campuses and to help inform students, faculty, staff and visitors about expectations for healthy living and a safe return to campus. The “Stay Well” signage is consistent with University, state, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.

The “Stay Well” website contains information about interior and exterior signs, a user guide with visual examples, links to customizable and printable “Stay Well” sign files, and information about how units can order specialized signs and materials.

Visit the Stay Well website to download signs or order materials

Building Access Requests (Updated 5/29)

Updated 5/29, 4:00pm

A&A faculty or staff members who need to gain entrance to a building should email their unit head and access coordinator with the date and time they would like to enter. Their entry will be documented and they will be given cleaning instructions.

The following is a list of the Access Coordinators for each Unit:

  • School of Theatre – Carrie Love – cxr906
  • School of Music – Russell Bloom – rlb16
  • Stuckeman School (including Graphic Design) – Jamie Behers – jlf47
  • School of Visual Arts – Jeremy Fisher – jhf149
  • Palmer Museum of Art – Jeremy Warner – jrw255
  • Eisenhower Auditorium – Lea Asbell-Swanger – ela1
  • All other units in Borland – Art History, ODL, Finance, Development, Research, Undergraduate Studies – Gwen Miller – gem15

Cleaning Protocols

Zoom Security (Updated 4/29)

All employees – Due to increased security threats and the frequency and severity of recent security breaches during Zoom meetings – also known as “Zoom-bombings” – security updates are being implemented University-wide. ArtsIT is pushing the latest version of Zoom (5.0) to all A&A computers (for most users this has already happened).

In the new version of Zoom, many features will be turned off unless enabled by the meeting Host. Key features that have had settings altered include:

  • Only Authenticated users can join: Only Penn State users can join the meeting. The Host will have the option to turn this feature off before a meeting.  
  • Require password for participants joining by phone: This feature will be turned on, and Participants joining by phone will need the password provided by the Host to enter the meeting. The Host has the option to turn this off for all meetings or individual meetings before a meeting.   
  • *Chat: This feature will be off for new meetings. The Host has the option to turn chat back on for Participants before a meeting or during the meeting by using the new Security button in the Zoom toolbar.  
  • *Who can screen share: Only the Host will be able to share their screen. The Host has the option to turn this off to allow Participants to share before a meeting or during the meeting by using the new Security button in the Zoom toolbar.  
  • *Waiting Room: This feature will be on by default, and the Host will need to allow each Participant into the meeting individually or all at once. The Host will have the option to turn this off for all meetings or for individual meetings before the meeting begins, and/or during the meeting.  
  • *Q&A in Webinar: This feature will be turned off by default, and the Host has the option to turn it on before the meeting or during the meeting by using the new Security button in the Zoom toolbar.  

Settings marked with an *asterisk must be enabled before the meeting starts for the Host to access them during the meeting. 

You can learn more about the increased security features of Zoom 5.0 – including upgraded network encryption – on the Zoom blog. For more information and a full list of changes, please visit the new Zoom Security page on the Office of Information Security website. Questions or concerns regarding the changes can be directed to the Zoom team by contacting Mark Katsouros at msk24@psu.edu.

Webinars + Training

Zoom-based training opportunities from the IT Learning and Development Group on continuity of instruction. Multiple sessions offered in each topic. Note: Login to the network first, then return to this page to select one of the training links.

Open/Recorded Sessions

Penn State Learning Resources

Faculty

Information, guidelines, and forms for Arts and Architecture faculty.

LEARN MORE

Staff

Professional development, guidelines, and resources for Arts and Architecture staff.

LEARN MORE

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University Park, PA 16802

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