The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

·              Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)

·              Your name, university or other affiliation

·              Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)

·              Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

1.       Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy 

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

 2.       Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections 

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

3.       Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy 

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

4.       Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning  

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

5.       Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

 

6.       Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections 

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook(ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries

Mind over Chatter”:Mindfulness, Media, & Misinformation in the Digital Era

Friday, September 13, 2019

Indiana University Kokomo

Kokomo, Indiana

Keynote speaker: Michael Caulfield, Director of Blended and Networked Learning, Washington State University, and author of Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers

“Falsehood is the essence of all media, extending mankind’s natural inclination to myth-making.” – Marshall McLuhan

This symposium seeks to bring together a diverse group of scholars, teachers, and thinkers from around the state of Indiana and beyond to discuss pedagogical strategies and solutions to help today’s college students cope with “network propaganda” of all kinds. In an increasingly complex, fast-moving, and confusing digital media environment rife with problematic information (mis- and disinformation, propaganda, so-called “fake news,” pseudo-science, manipulation, etc.), what are our responsibilities as teachers and literacy advocates? How might we reconceptualize our roles against a societal backdrop of declining trust in professions and institutions?

We are most interested in exploring how the practice of mindfulness—in a variety of forms and formats—can contribute to and deepen our students’ understanding of the current epistemological moment and the way misinformation flows, functions, and moves through the digital media ecosystem. Approaches may draw from any of the following topics, though presenters are encouraged to depart from and elaborate on these ideas as they see fit:

  • Using mindfulness techniques/habits of mind approaches to teach digital information literacy (e.g., confirmation bias, truth-default theory, mere exposure effect, epistemic dependence, etc.)
  • Machine learning and artificial intelligence in classroom/teaching applications
  • The epistemology/structure/theory of network propaganda, dis- and misinformation, manipulation, and the “post-Truth” era
  • The architecture of social media networks, especially as it pertains to the spread of disinformation, propaganda, and problematic information in general
  • Pedagogical approaches to digital literacy/teaching resistance to disinformation
  • Misinformation in science, medicine, and technology
  • The history of misinformation, histories of misinformation
  • Network theory and the role of networks/social media in spreading misinformation: networks and actors, algorithms, micro-targeting, actor-network theory, materiality, object-oriented rhetorics and approaches
  • Intersections between politics and misinformation

The conference organizers welcome either individual paper proposals (approx. 15 minutes) or panel presentations of 3-4 presenters (approx. 45 minutes). All sessions will be 60 minutes total with 15 minutes reserved for a robust Q & A. Please upload your proposal (500-word maximum) with contact information to this Google form by June 21, 2019 at 11:59pm EDT. Presenters will be notified of their acceptance via email no later than July 12, 2019. For any and all queries, contact the conference organizers via email at cfp19@iuk.edu.

Bucknell University Digital Scholarship Conference

We invite you to submit a proposal for Bucknell University’s sixth annual
digital scholarship conference (#BUDSC19) on its campus in Lewisburg, PA from
October 11th – 13th. The theme for this year’s conference is “From Wonder to
Action: the Journey of Digital Scholarship.”

#BUDSC19 is committed to expanding the definition of digital scholarship to be
more inclusive across diverse communities, both inside and outside of
academia. The conference will bring together a broad community of
practitioners–faculty, researchers, librarians, artists, educational
technologists, students, administrators, and others–engaged in digital
scholarship both in research and teaching who share an interest in the journey
of digital scholarship.

To submit your proposal visit: https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftinyurl.com%2Fbudsc19&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C2b241fdcb1ac4e01bdf808d6cf0625ae%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636924022678563170&sdata=LZjWiYYv7zGqGq5NUrh%2BZ0T4XGkzlubCI6iRMIpn6ME%3D&reserved=0

Proposals are due 8:00 PM, Eastern Time (US), Thursday, June 6th

We look forward to building on the success of the last five years, in which we
came together to discuss challenges, share working models, reflect on
projects, and inspire new avenues for actively including students in scholarly
pursuits. For more information, please view our highlights from the 2018
meeting, the conference website or search our archived sessions.

Innovations in Information Literacy

Series Title:

Innovations in Information Literacy

Series Editor:

Trudi Jacobson, MLS, MA

Distinguished Librarian

University at Albany

Publisher:

Rowman & Littlefield

The series has a broad information literacy focus, in content and audience, as well as geographical scope. The cohering element is an emphasis on innovations within information literacy. These innovations might come from new conceptions of the evolving nature and understanding of information literacy, new teaching methods, or new pedagogical technologies.

If you have an idea for a manuscript that fits these parameters, and an interest in writing (or possibly editing) a book on the topic, please do let me know.  Send along a paragraph or two about the topic and your expertise in the area, this will be sufficient to start a conversation about your idea.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Trudi Jacobson

Distinguished Librarian

Head, Information Literacy Department

University Libraries

University at Albany

(518) 442-3581

tjacobson@albany.edu

Lead the Way: Libraries at the Heart of Community Engagement

April 20-21, 2020     |     Madison, WI
Do you have ideas to share about engaging your community?
Lead the Way: Libraries at the Heart of Community Engagement is an ideal venue to share your exciting projects and practices!  Librarians and staff from all types of libraries are invited to attend and present. The program committee will accept proposals until September 6, 2019.
 
Topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • community engagement for beginners
  • how to be an engaged leader
  • service outside the library
  • making connections & partnerships within the community
  • community engagement and strategic planning
  • library as a lead community engagement institution
  • community engagement as library advocacy
  • services focused on diversity and inclusion
  • community engagement related to all forms of accessibility
  • teaching as a form of engagement
  • leveraging technology to enhance engagement
  • community engagement and programing re-boots
  • using community data to inform decision making
  • how to fund community engagement projects
  • administrative strategies to foster community engagement
Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity Statement
The Program Committee encourages presenters representing a variety of personal and professional backgrounds, perspectives, and voices. We aim for conference presenters to be as diverse as the communities we serve. Submissions are welcome from anyone who is interested in presenting, including students, new professionals, first-time presenters, and representatives of allied professions.
Proposal Evaluation
The committee will evaluate all of the submissions as individual entries, and how they fit within the balance of conference content as a whole. The Program Committee will evaluate all proposals submitted by the deadline using the following criteria:
  • Clarity and completeness of the proposal, particularly having well-developed content and sufficient speakers to address all relevant aspects of the topic;
  • Originality and relevance of the proposed topic;
  • Uniqueness of content in relation to other conference presentations;
  • A range of speaker experiences and representations
How to submit a proposal
Please submit a 200-250 word description of your proposed session to Anna Palmer, ahpalmer@wisc.edu, by Sept 6, 2019. Sessions at the conference will be one hour.  Please include an additional sentence or two about how this proposal aligns with our diversity, inclusion and equity statement outlined above. Note that the proposal will not be the finalized description for the conference program; the committee will contact selected speakers for a final draft. Panel presentations are accepted.
All selected proposals will receive one complimentary conference registration, which may be divided however the presenters of that session choose.
Questions? Contact Anna Palmer or Meredith Lowe

Makerspaces for Adults: Best Practices and Great Projects

We would like to invite you to submit a chapter proposal for our upcoming
publication, Makerspaces for Adults: Best Practices and Great Projects. This
edited collection has been accepted for publication by Rowman & Littlefield.

Overview
This book highlights how to integrate your makerspace within university and
public libraries and the wider community. Discover how you can connect your
makerspace with service learning to support different groups, take your
makerspace tools to various points of need through community partnerships, and
build relationships with faculty, students, and patrons through makerspace
projects. Intended for academic and public librarians, faculty, and staff who
would like to implement more making into their classes and build productive
collaborations, this book includes sections that cover theory, best practices,
and project ideas that provide a clear guide on how to develop and implement
your makerspace within the curriculum and make connections with outside
partners.

The book will be broken down into 4 main parts:
Part I: Service Learning
Using makerspace programs to help the community
Part II: Academic Connections
How the makerspace can be used in an academic library. How professors can use
the makerspace with class projects.
Part III: Public Library Makers
Public library programs focused on adult makers
Part IV: Community Outreach
Programs outside of the makerspace using makerspace materials.

Each part will consist of two sections:
The first section will include chapters that cover theory and best practices
and should be about 3,500 words (10 double-spaced pages in 12-point type).
The second section will share 3-5 projects with detailed instructions and
images.  Each project will consist of about 1,800 words (6 double-spaced pages
in 12-point type) and include at least one photograph of the project. Projects
may also feature figures and tables that help explain or support readers in
implementation.
You are welcome to submit multiple abstracts for chapters and/or projects.

Proposal Submissions:
Please send an abstract to makerspacecommunitybook@gmail.com with the
following information.
Name, current title, and institution
Proposed chapter or project title. Please also include which part you feel
your chapter would best fit.
300-500 word abstract of your proposed chapter

All proposals should be submitted by May 17, 2019.

We welcome proposals from librarians, library professionals, scholars,
educators, and community members who work with makerspaces and/or develop
programming for makerspace projects.

Contributors will be notified of acceptance by May 24, 2019.

If you have any questions about the book or proposals, please contact Jessie
Long and Jennifer Hicks at makerspacecommunitybook@gmail.com
For an archive of past messages from the ILI listserv, visit: https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Flists.ala.org%2Fsympa%2Finfo%2Fili-l&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C34ffac2913d54561a10008d6d0981b8d%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C1%7C636925749059576150&sdata=KkvuBHIdWSJbMqVhWqHi52fhynNk%2F7BeYaFS4XDH7pc%3D&reserved=0.

Research Matters: Strengthening Values, Defining Practice, Library Research Seminar (LRS VII)

Call for Proposals

Research Matters: Strengthening Values, Defining Practice

When: October 16-18, 2019

Where: The University of South Carolina, Columbia, Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library

Who: Hosted jointly by the University of South Carolina College of Information and Communication, University of South Carolina School of Library and Information Science, the University Libraries, and the Library Research Roundtable of the American Library Association.

Why: 21st century libraries face critical challenges in the age of big data, fake news, and new information technologies that are driving change in our communities, which requires us to think differently about how we gather and use evidence to inform our practice. This conference brings together scholars, students, and practitioners to explore research that can move us toward innovative solutions to practical problems and provide effective direction for policy.

What: The seventh Library Research Seminar (LRS VII) will bring together a diverse community of scholars and students from academia and practitioners from libraries and archives who are conducting or interested in learning about emerging and established research that informs critical awareness, best practices, decision-making, teaching and learning, and creative use of new technologies in all areas of libraries and the communities they serve. Participants will share research projects, discuss potential new research agendas, and have the opportunity to refine research methods and facilitate successful completion of research projects.

LRS is a research meeting that can include empirical, methodological, and conceptual work with the field of library and information science.  It can include (but is not limited to) the following kinds of scholarship:

 

  • Quantitative and/or qualitative inquiry
  • Research on function, such as information seeking and retrieval, services, classification, or management
  • Inquiry related to specific environments, such as public, academic, special or school libraries
  • Research conducted by students
  • Collaborative work between professional practitioners and educators

 

The LRS VII Planning Committee invites proposals for papers, panels, posters, and workshops.  We anticipate that discussion will examine issues related to how scholars, practitioners, and scholar-practitioners can bridge the divide between LIS-related research and practice to better serve our communities in light of today’s critical information issues.  We welcome creative contributions from individuals and groups, students, faculty, and practitioners on a broad range of topics related to libraries including but not limited to:

  • Cutting edge research that crosses boundaries within and beyond the field of library and information science
  • The role and impact of social justice values on LIS research and practice
  • Connecting diversity and inclusion consciousness to research and practice
  • Community/campus engagement and collaboration
  • Identification of research agendas and knowledge gaps
  • Exploration of innovation in LIS education teaching and learning models, methods
  • Librarian-faculty and other partnerships and their impact on research and the collaborative approach
  • Transformation of 21st century libraries and LIS research
  • Innovation in evidence-based practice
  • Public and school library perspectives
  • Communication and sharing processes within and across institutional boundaries

How: A lively discussion of paper, panel, poster, and workshop presentations and activities, including a step-by-step assessment methods preconference and follow up sessions for early stage researchers and researcher-practitioners.

Proposal submission guidelines and formats:

The deadline for submission of proposals is May 24, 2019. In addition to an abstract, each author or panelist must provide a separate biographical statement (maximum of 50 words).

Papers

*Paper proposals must include a title and abstract (maximum of 500 words). Papers will be blind-reviewed; please do not include identifying information in the paper proposal.

*Paper proposals should be submitted individually, and they will be grouped with others on a common theme, typically for a 90-minute session comprised of three paper presentations.  The abstract submitted should state the focus of the paper and the way(s) in which it contributes to the body of knowledge in the field. Presentation time for papers should be no more than 20 minutes.

Posters

*Poster proposals must include a title, author(s), format, and abstract (maximum of 500 words).

*This formal graphic presentation of the topic, offers an excellent opportunity for reporting on evaluation results and gathering detailed feedback on one’s work. Posters should be no larger than 40″ high and 44″ wide. Graduate student submissions are encouraged.

 

Panels

*Panel proposals must include title, author(s), and abstract (maximum of 750 words).

*The abstract should describe how three or more panelists will creatively present a cohesive theme and promote lively discussions between panelists and audience members. Proposals should provide a description of the issues to be discussed, and a list of panelists who have agreed to participate with their qualifications and contributions to the panel.

Workshops

*Workshop proposals must include title, author(s), and abstract (maximum of 750 words).

*The abstract should provide an outline of the workshop, and describe how participants will engage an issue, learn a new skill, or develop an action plan or other activity where hands-on learning is integral. Submissions must include at least three learning outcomes and an example of an activity you plan to conduct. The learning experience should excite and encourage the participants to take risks, question assumptions, and fully engage in the learning process.  Workshops are expected to be 90 minutes in length.

Evaluation Procedures:

The Conference Planning Committee will evaluate proposals based on:

*Relevance to the theme

*Significance of its contribution to LIS research or practice

*Clarity of expression

* Appropriateness of the methodology to the research question

*Status of research: Are the results in hand? When appropriate, please include the timeline for completion of research.

Upload submission information in either MS Word or PDF format to EasyChair here: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=lrs7.

Important dates:

Deadline for proposal submissions:  MAY 24, 2019

Notification:  JUNE 21, 2019

Conference dates: October 16-18, 2019

LRS VII co-chairs: Jen Sweeney, San Jose State University and Amanda Folk, Ohio State University  jksweeney572@gmail.com   folk.68@osu.edu

For more information on Library Research Seminar VII, please visit https://sites.google.com/ucmo.edu/lrs-vii/home?authuser=0

 

 

 

 

2019 Library Marketing and Communications Conference (LMCC)

Showcase your best work at the 2019 Library Marketing and Communications Conference. The Call for Proposals is now open!

The 2019 Library Marketing and Communications Conference (LMCC) Planning Committee invites you to submit presentation proposals for consideration to our 5th Annual LMCC Conference in St. Louis, Missouri. The conference will be held November 13-14, 2019, at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch.

Successful proposals will showcase the tried and true, the latest trends, and the best practices in marketing and communications. Provide practical tips and takeaways that can be immediately applied to any library’s communication and marketing efforts. We’re looking for speakers who have done this work long enough to have experiences and lessons to share. You should be able to discuss the theory behind your decisions, as well as your actions themselves, and your results. Ideally, your presentation will be applicable and transferable to other types and sizes of libraries.

Have an idea? Please apply! The deadline is May 24, 2019.

We welcome all proposals for consideration. Possible topics include:

·         Communications / PR / Media relations

·         Strategy / Research / Planning / Style guides

·         Workflow management

·         Staff buy-in / Internal support and partnerships

·         Diversity

·         User experience / Accessibility

·         Advocacy / Funding

·         Partnerships

·         Embedding

·         Promoting outreach programs & services

·         Engaging user groups

·         Videography / Animation / Editing

·         Social media

·         Graphic design

·         Website design

·         Other technology / Software

We welcome all proposals for consideration, including proposals from individuals or colleagues who want to co-present. We also encourage panel submissions in which speakers will share different takes on the same topic.

For more information on submitting your proposal, the proposal timeline, the criteria for acceptance and the Call For Proposals form, visithttps://www.librarymarketingconference.org/Call-for-Proposals

E-Resource Round Up in Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL)

This is a last call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 31, issue 3 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Wednesday, May 29, 2019. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-0548

bwolverton@library.msstate.edu

Karen Davidson

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-3018

kdavidson@library.msstate.edu

PA Library Association Poster Presentations and Lightning Talks

The Pennsylvania Library Association (PaLA) holds an annual conference each fall to provide the library community with continuing education and networking opportunities. This year’s conference, Shine On! will take place Sunday, October 13 – Wednesday, October 16 at the Bayfront Convention Center located on Lake Erie’s beautiful Presque Isle Bay.

This year, we are offering the option for poster presentations and lightning talks.  Both provide a forum for library professionals to share their successful ideas or innovations with colleagues without doing a formal presentation.  Poster and Lightning Talk FAQs

All proposal submissions must be made via the online submission form, and the deadline to submit is Wednesday, May 15, 2019.
Please note that due to scheduling restraints, their are a limited number of lighting talks that can be accepted.  Many more posters (up to 48) can be scheduled.  So, if you are able to do your presentation as either a lightning talk OR a poster, please indicate “both” when indicating the type of presentation, as this will increase your chances for acceptance.

We look forward to hearing about your latest programs and innovations!