Category Archives: Gender Studies

Distance Education special issue: Distance Education Across Critical Theoretical Landscapes

The  purpose  of this  special  themed  issue  is  to provide  a  venue  for scholars, researchers, instructional  designers, and classroom  teachers  to engage  with critical  theories  and diversity in open, flexible  and technology-mediated distance  learning environments.  To provide  the  most opportunity for inclusion, we  invite  submissions  that  consider a  wide  variety of technologies, pedagogies,  modes  and settings  (e.g., K-12, higher education, and industry/corporate  settings). We encourage  submissions  that  represent  the  theoretical  landscape, and which demonstrate  the breadth and depth of theoretical  lenses  that  have  been historically underrepresented. This includes, but  is  not  limited to the  following:  critical  race  theory, critical  pedagogies, disability studies, feminisms, heutagogy, and LGBTQIA+ studies. Finally, we  invite  a  variety of research paradigms  as  well  as  theoretical  pieces, meta-analyses, and strategic  reviews  of the literature.
More information can be found here: https://t.co/ 5WZg7UpOUkqncapes

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Special Issue: The Built Environment in Pennsylvania History

https://hsp.org/publications/pennsylvania-magazine-of-history-biography/calls-for-papers

The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography is issuing a call for articles to be included in a special issue on the built environment in Pennsylvania history, scheduled for publication in October 2021.

 The editors seek submissions of the following two sorts.

 Scholarly Articles: The editors seek submissions of scholarly articles (25–35 pages, double spaced) featuring new research on the built environment in Pennsylvania history. We welcome articles on architecture, infrastructure, parks, (de)industrialization, statues, monuments, and other subjects. While certainly not limited to the following, potential authors may wish to consider these questions: How has Philadelphia’s image of itself as a “greene country towne” affected different groups of residents over time? What legacies have coal and other industries left on the state, and when and how have these developments caused conflicts with environmental advocates? How should controversial aspects of the state’s history be memorialized in public spaces? Selections will be based on both quality and the need to represent a full range of topics and time periods.

Hidden Gems: The editors seek submissions of short articles (250–750 words) featuring hidden gems highlighting unknown, underused, or misunderstood sources related to the built environment in Pennsylvania history. We invite articles focusing on both written and non-written sources, including but not limited to diaries, manuscript collections, novels, government documents, oral histories, newspapers, photographs, artifacts, monuments, and cultural sites. These items may or may not be found in the state, but they must illuminate some aspect of the built environment in Pennsylvania history. See https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5215/pennmaghistbio.142.issue-3 for examples of such essays.

Submission details: Submissions should be addressed to Christina Larocco, editor, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography (pmhb@hsp.org).

Guest editors: Potential contributors are strongly encouraged to consult with one of the two guest editors for this issue of the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography well before the submission deadline: Elizabeth Milroy, professor and department head, Department of Art and Art History, Drexel University (em678@drexel.edu), and Randall Mason, associate professor of historic preservation, University of Pennsylvania (rfmason@design.upenn.edu).

 Deadline for submission of completed articles: January 1, 2020

Feminist Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition

Society for Analytical Feminism

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Deadline: July 1, 2019

SAF Session at the Eastern Division APA 2020
Philadelphia, PA, Jan 8 – 11, 2019

The Society for Analytical Feminism invites submissions of abstracts of papers or proposals for a session at the 2020 Eastern Division APA meeting in Philadelphia, PA. The Society seeks abstracts of works that examine feminist issues by methods broadly construed as analytic, or that discuss the use of analytic philosophical methods as applied to feminist issues. Authors should submit abstracts for papers of a length appropriate to a 20-minute presentation time. (If you are proposing an author-meets-critics session, involving multiple people, we welcome that information but expect an abstract-length proposal indicating that the author has confirmed to you their intention to participate, as well as indication of the relevance of the book/author to a SAF session, such as the themes to be discussed.)

Please delete all self-identifying references from your abstract to ensure anonymity. Use the form posted here at: https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fforms.gle%2FrQ5azk9o7v6JxcSDA&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C319560d0628641934bdb08d6e4597653%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C1%7C636947470229660384&sdata=qPyAq6n47DtRdDAqTPfyrrDoaUaFNwIdZLCdXLQFXfo%3D&reserved=0.  Attach submissions as a Word or PDF attachment. Deadline for submissions: July 1, 2018. Graduate students or underfunded professionals whose papers are accepted will be eligible for the Society’s $350 Travel Stipend. Please indicate on submission form if you fall into one of these categories and wish to be considered for the stipend. Direct any questions to feminist.analytic@gmail.com.

The deadlines for submissions to the Central (in Chicago, February 26 – 29) and the Pacific (in San Francisco, April 8 – 12) follow quickly after these (July 15 and August 5 respectively).  Check out the SAF Website — https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fsites.google.com%2Fsite%2Fanalyticalfeminism%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C319560d0628641934bdb08d6e4597653%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C1%7C636947470229670376&sdata=ccc7CoZECUGf5%2BIxxdsqOFJENhUAgSAKMvab5eeaU50%3D&reserved=0 — to submit for the Central or the Pacific.

Northeast Modern Language Association for its 51st Annual Convention

Please join the Northeast Modern Language Association for its 51st Annual
Convention <https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.buffalo.edu%2Fnemla%2Fconvention.html&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C87a534503c9c4b4ef34c08d6e468c0fb%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C1%7C636947535898664553&amp;sdata=35XV%2FHzqSzN2bZtYQl%2FroUn%2B9180ISgiyWLzK77CWBI%3D&amp;reserved=0> at the Boston
Marriott Copley Place, conveniently located in the heart of the city. The
theme of NeMLA 2020 is “Shaping and Sharing Identities: Spaces, Places,
Languages, and Cultures” — a topic embracing the many facets that define
each and every human being across cultures and languages, as well as the
many ways in which we interact with each other in today’s rapidly changing
global world.

NeMLA is thrilled to announce that Boston University is the local host
institution and that the featured author is Andre Dubus III, whose novel *Gone
So Long* will be the focus of “NeMLA Reads Together.” The opening address
will be given by Professor Maurice Lee, author of the award-winning *Uncertain
Chances: Science, Skepticism, and Belief in 19th-century American
Literature*.

This year features more than 100 sessions in women’s and gender
studies. Submit abstracts with a free NeMLA user account at
cfplist.com/nemla by September 30, 2019. For more information, please visit
buffalo.edu/nemla.

Journal of Play in Adulthood”

The new “Journal of Play in Adulthood” now has an open call for papers!
This new diamond open access journal (free to read and publish in) would welcome papers from information literacy practitioners and researchers. Research based articles are subject to double blind peer review, but we also welcome articles from practice, extended essays, and reviews that might be of interest to our readers.
Key topics of interest to the journal include the role of play in learning, work, our social and cultural lives, the benefits to individuals and society, and the interrelationship between play and other areas of adult life. The focus of this journal is on play in adulthood to explicitly distinguish it from children’s play, and to highlight that the motivations, contexts, and forms of play are, in many cases, different. In summary, it covers playful living, playful working, and playful learning.

Contact:

Andrew Walsh MSc MCLIP FHEA FRSA IFNTF

University Teaching Fellow, National Teaching Fellow

Academic Librarian for Education and Professional Development.

Editor of the Journal of Play in Adulthood

https://www.journalofplayinadulthood.org.uk

I

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

Conference Announcement & Call for Proposals:

Culturally Responsive Teaching in Libraries

MILEX 2019 Spring Conference

Thursday, April 25, 2019, 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Loyola Graduate Center, 8890 McGaw Rd, Columbia, MD

(Registration forthcoming)

The Maryland Information Literacy Exchange (MILEX) is a collaborative of Maryland academic librarians to promote information literacy in higher education.

Join us at this year’s MILEX Spring Conference featuring presentations on the role of libraries in culturally responsive teaching.  A keynote will be given by Ashleigh D. Coren, Special Collections Librarian for Teaching and Learning at University of Maryland Libraries, whose teaching focuses on diverse students and finding stories in the collection. Coren is co-developer of the LGBTQ Oral History Project at UMD, and was recognized as an Emerging Leader by ALA in 2018.

Registration fees (light breakfast and hot lunch included):

MILEX member                      $45

Non-member                           $75

Membership + Registration     $65

Student                                    $20

For more information, visit the MILEX website: www.milexmd.org.

Call for Proposals! (Due March 4th)

We’re looking for presentations that demonstrate how librarians are engaging in culturally responsive teaching. Submit proposals to the chair of the conference committee, Jordan Sly, at jsly@umd.edu by Monday, March 4, 2019.

Include the following in your proposal:

1.       In a paragraph or two, what your presentation will entail; a general outline is fine.

2.       Student learning outcomes (what will students learn/develop as a result of the activity)

3.       Optimal amount of time that should be allotted for your presentation

4.       Any resources you will need

5.       Short biographical statement

Registration will open on March 12 at the MILEX website:www.milexmd.org/events.html.

Register early, as space will be limited.

Please don’t hesitate to contact Jordan Sly with your questions and concerns: 301-405-9290.

Funds raised will be administered by the University System of Maryland Foundation, Inc. for the benefit of MILEX – Maryland Information Literacy Exchange.

EDUCATION, SOCIETY, & REFORM CONFERENCE

28-29 JUNE 2019, ANKARA

For more information go to: http://www.edusref.org/

Education, Society & Reform Research (EDUSREF-2019) is an International Conference that aims to bridge the knowledge gap, promote social research esteem, and produce democratic information for potential education reforms.

Main Theme of the Conference is

“Questioning of Changes in Education: Looking for Priorities in Education”

 

Abstract Submission Deadline: 15 April 2019

Early Bird Registration Deadline: 22 May 2019

 

Conference Dates: 28 and 29 June 2019

 

Full Paper Submission Deadline: 15 September 2019

 

(After the conference, the interested presenters may submit their fulltext to Education Reform Journal on www.erjournal.org for possible evaluation.

 

Also the presenters who want to publish their papers in the e-book may send it edusref@outlook.com)

 

Conference Topics

Paper topics may include, but are not limited, to the following:

 

  • Educational Policies and Practices
  • Trends and Challenges Shaping Education
  • Large-Scale Assessments in Education (PISA, TALIS, PIACC etc.)
  • Economic Challenges (i.e. BREXIT) and its Reflections on Education Systems
  • International Benchmarking /Indicators
  • Comparative Studies in education
  • Social Transitions & School Culture and Climate
  • Socio-Psychological Analyses for Education
  • Social Media and its Reflections on Schools
  • Migration and Education Studies
  • Gender and Education Studies
  • Inclusive Education
  • School Improvement
  • Creativity and Innovation in Education
  • Innovative Learning Environments
  • Curriculum Critiques
  • School Leadership
  • Performance Appraisal in Education
  • Law of Education
  • Professional Development
  • Teacher Education
  • Developing Higher Education Systems

 

In order to make the productions of the conference efficient, the authors are expected to answer this question “What are the implications based on the results of study for potential education reforms? “ in the conclusion remarks in their study.

 

Conference Secretary

 

e-mail: edusref@outlook.com

 

 

International Intersectionality Conference

Link to pdf: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fdornsife.usc.edu%2Fassets%2Fsites%2F80%2Fdocs%2FCFR_International_Intersectionality_Conference_CFP_-_FINAL.pdf&amp;data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C0d1fe79ddcab44dba36d08d665e3e14c%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636808426748363078&amp;sdata=5mtTTSJelpttrWskRww0BCJfmz4qezwi9LJzq1zRcyM%3D&amp;reserved=0

Call for Papers:
International Intersectionality Conference University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, CA, USA March 6-8, 2019
The Center for Feminist Research at the University of Southern California (USC) invites submissions of paper proposals for our 2019 Internationality Intersectionality Conference to be held on March 6-8, 2019 on the campus of USC in Los Angeles, CA. Papers presented will be considered for inclusion in a forthcoming Handbook of Intersectionality co-edited by Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro and Nira Yuval-Davis.
This year’s conference theme, “Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production,” will focus on approaches to intersectional research over time, emphasizing the role of intersectional research in shaping the scope of cutting-edge work across disciplines including but not limited to political science, public health, sociology, psychology, feminist media studies, ethnic studies, literature, social movements, law and public policy.
Proposal Guidelines:
Individual paper proposals should include a 500-word abstract, including a paper title. Please submit proposals in Word format along with contact information including name, address, and institutional affiliation to InterIntersectionality.2019@gmail.com by 11:59 PM Pacific Standard Time on January 7, 2019 to be considered. Questions can be sent to Ange-Marie Hancock Alfaro, Director of the USC Center for Feminist Research and Conference Convener: ahancock@usc.edu
As we plan our conference in Southern California, a geographic area with a rich cultural history long before European contact, we are mindful of the multi-various ways that power is structured through space and place and how those structures interact with race, gender, gender-identity, nationality, class, [dis]ability, and sexuality.
“Intersectional Echoes: Cross-Generational Practices and Knowledge Production” will explore the history of intersectional research, challenges that drive the field today, and ways to build up intersectional and cross-generational networks for the future. While the notion of echoes conjures up important thinking about haunting and the past, our theme includes and welcomes engagements with non-Western, nonlinear, and non-capitalist temporalities.
We seek papers that explore and/or expand the boundaries of intersectionality as a growing field of study. Comparative, cross-national, interdisciplinary, and cross-generational work that are either interpretive, quantitative, qualitative, or use multiple methods are welcome. Below are some topics that potential contributors might consider:
*Mapping the presence/absence of categories of difference like class or culture *Race, gender, and sexuality in the digital era
*Migration and belonging during times of war or political conflict *Scholar-activism as a practice of radicalizing feminist futures
*Language, cultural meanings, and practices of identity in politics
*Health inequality and future intersectional frameworks of care for self and others *Critical race theory and interconnections with class, gender, and sexuality *Womxn of color and public policy
*Quantitative patterns of intersectional inequality

CAPAL19: The Politics of Conversation: Identity, Community, and Communication

CAPAL/ACBAP Annual Meeting – June 2 -4, 2019 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2019

University of British Columbia

Vancouver, British Columbia

The Canadian Association of Professional Academic Librarians (CAPAL) invites you to participate in its annual conference, to be held as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences 2019 at the University of British Columbia on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territory of the xʷməθkʷəy̓ əm (Musqueam) people. This conference offers librarians and allied professionals across all disciplines an alternative space to share research and scholarship, challenge current thinking about professional issues, and forge new relationships.

Theme

In keeping with the Congress 2019 theme, Circles of Conversation, the theme of CAPAL19 is Politics of Conversation: Identity, Community, and Communication.

 This conference provides an opportunity for the academic library community to critically examine and discuss the ways in which our profession is influenced by its social, political, and economic environments. By considering academic librarianship within its historical contexts, its presents, and its possible futures, and by situating it within evolving cultural frameworks and structures of power, we can better understand the ways in which academic librarianship may reflect, reinforce, or challenge these contexts both positively and negatively.

In what kinds of conversation are we or are we not engaging within the profession, academia, and civil society? How are the various identities that constitute our communities reflected (or not) within academic librarianship, and how do we engage in conversations within our own communities and with communities that we may see as external.

Potential Topics:

Papers presented might relate to aspects of the following themes (though they need not be limited to them):

·       Diversity: how do we ensure our circles (communities, spaces) are diverse? What are the circles available to librarians, and how do we ensure that librarians are not circumscribed by their identities within these circles? This could apply both to academic vs. public librarianship, or academic librarian vs. the broader academic community, but perhaps more importantly, it could ask these questions with respect to women, people of colour, and Indigenous librarians.

·       Intellectual and academic freedom: How do we define our responsibilities and our liberties in these areas? Are these positive or negative freedoms, especially with respect to broader communities?

·         “Imagined Communities”: It is the 35th anniversary of Benedict Anderson’s Imagined Communities. How do librarians see themselves in various “imagined communities” (nationality, community of practice, inter- and cross-disciplinary), and what are the politics of our participation?

·       Conversations outside the circles: how do we make our research relevant outside LIS? Is this different for different kinds of research? How do we bring public values and ideas into our work and research?

·       Labour and solidarity: how to we organize ourselves within academic librarianship; how do we connect our conversations with other library workers, other academic workers, other workers as a whole.

·       Conversations within practice/praxis: how are communications and connections established and maintained with the profession and between academic librarians and administrators, faculty, students, and other researchers.

The Program Committee invites proposals for individual papers as well as proposals for panel submissions of three papers. Proposed papers must be original and not have been published elsewhere.

·       Individual papers are typically 20 minutes in length. For individual papers, please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words and a presentation title, with a brief biographical statement and your contact information.

·         For complete panels, please submit a panel abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a list of all participants and brief biographical statements, and a separate abstract of no more than 400 words for each presenter. Please identify and provide participants’ contact information for the panel organizer.

Please feel free to contact the Program Committee to discuss a topic for a paper, panel, or other session format. Proposals should be emailed as an attachment in your preferred format (open formats welcome!), using the following filename convention:

 Lastname_Title.<extension>

Proposals and questions should be directed to the Program Chair, Sam Popowich at

Sam.Popowich [at] ualberta.ca

Deadline for Proposals is: 21/12/2018

Further information about the conference, as well as Congress 2019 more broadly, will be available soon.

Consumer Identities and Social Change Symposium

Submission deadline: January 10, 2019

In partnership with The Institute for International Communication at St. John’s University, Consumer Identities is now accepting submissions for paper presentations at an upcoming one-day symposium, Consumer Identities and Social Change.

We seek transdisciplinary interpretations and critical analyses of consumer identity, broadly defined, across various cultural and media landscapes that address some aspect of social change. This symposium follows the 2017 installment, Consumer Identities and Digital Culture.

Potential topics (including but not limited to):

  • Activism and consumption
  • Anti-consumerism
  • Consumer identity and global issues
  • Corporate social responsibility and popular culture
  • Cultural marketing and consumer relationships
  • Environmental responsibility, greenwashing and branding
  • Grassroots media
  • Historical changes in consumer culture
  • The political economy of consumption

    We welcome scholarly submissions that address audience, industry, and critical/cultural perspectives and are particularly interested in the intersections thereof.

    Website: https://consumeridentities.com/

    Location: St. John’s University, New York City, Queens Campus

    Date: March 22, 2019

    Keynote: Dr. Emily West, Associate Professor, Department of Communication at the University of Massachusetts Amherst

    Submissions:

    350-word abstract and brief biographical note by 01/10/2019 to consumer.identities@gmail.com.

    Accepted panelists will be notified in mid-January.

    Please address any questions to:

    Candice D. Roberts
    Assistant Professor, Communication
    St. John’s University
    robertsc@stjohns.edu

    or

    Myles Ethan Lascity
    Assistant Professor, Fashion Media
    Southern Methodist University
    mlascity@smu.edu