Category Archives: Instruction

2019 JFDL Symposium

Pre-Convention Journal Symposium on Formative Design and Design Thinking

Sunday, October 20 and Monday October 21, 2019

Westgate Resort and Casino, Las Vegas, Nevada

CALL FOR PAPERS now live until June 15, 2019

Held in conjunction with the Annual International Convention of the  Association for Educational Communications & Technology (AECT),
October 21-24, 2019, Las Vegas, Nevada

Sponsored by:

  • the Journal of Formative Design in Learning (JDFL),
  • the College of Education at Florida Gulf Coast University,
  • the College of Community Innovations and Education at University of Central Florida,
  • the Office of Scholarship and Innovation, Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University

Design thinking has been receiving attention in education as a set of strategies applicable to student learning, teacher development, and educational innovation. There is a clear need for scholarly and practical evidence and examples of educational approaches that bring design into education particularly in regard to formative design. The goal of this symposium is to bring together scholars interested in the role of formative design and design thinking in a collaborative discussion and peer-review process to develop potential submissions for the Journal of Formative Design in Learning (JFDL).  While the focus of this symposium is on design thinking and how it relates to formative design, we are open to various approaches, tools, processes, and ways of viewing and applying formative design and design thinking in teaching and learning.

Specifically, the symposium will seek to accomplish the following:

  • To discuss and share a dialog about the current state of formative design and design thinking in teaching and learning.
  • To provide an opportunity for potential authors who submit a plan of work of a draft of a potential journal submission and presented in a small group setting, in order to receive valuable feedback for crafting their forthcoming work.
  • To participate in world caf roundtables to review full drafts from authors of planned submissions to the journal.

Note: Both the abstracts and article drafts should be explicitly focused on or deeply involved with the topics of formative design and design thinking. All submissions to the symposium will be considered for expedited review by JFDL once submissions are finalized and returned through normal submission channels.

Schedule

  • June 15, 2019: Abstracts and article drafts due.
  • July 15, 2019: Authors of papers accepted for discussion notified.
  • July 31, 2019: All papers available for attendee review. It is expected that all symposium attendees will review all submitted papers in order to actively participate in the discussions and roundtable reviews.
  • October 20-21, 2019: Symposium: The discussions will be guided and facilitated by members of the editorial board from JDFL and faculty from all three universities.
    • October 20, 2-5 PM: discussions on formative design and design thinking as well as review and discussions of abstracts or work-products of those who have submitted these written artifacts prior to the symposium.
    • October 21, 8:30AM 4PM: Participants who submit their drafts prior to the symposium will have their works reviewed in roundtable format by others who have also submitted as well as other who agree to participate in the sessions.
  • Specifics about submission requirements and more details about the symposium can be found on the journals support site: http:formativedesign.org, which will be made available by March 1, 2019.

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Symposium fee:  $150 (Registration includes continental breakfast and refreshment break on Sunday and Monday).

For more information go to https://www.aect.org/jfdl_symposium.php

For more information, including how to sign up for the Pre-Conference, please contact:
Dr. Robert Kenny, Editor-in-Chief, JFDL e-mail rkenny@fgcu.edu

 Teaching About “Fake News”: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences

CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

 “Fake news” is admittedly a very problematic phrase. Do you have better and/or innovative ways to teach and help students unpack the complexity of these concepts? Please consider submitting a book chapter proposal for our upcoming book.

Chapters are sought for the forthcoming ACRL book Teaching About “Fake News”: Lesson Plans for Different Disciplines and Audiences.

The problem of “fake news” has captured the attention of administrators and instructors, resulting in a rising demand for librarians to help students learn how to find and evaluate news sources.  But we know that the phrase “fake news” is applied broadly, used to describe a myriad of media literacy issues such as misinformation, disinformation, propaganda, and hoaxes. There’s no way we can teach everything there is to know about “fake news” in a 50-minute one-shot library session.  What we can do is tailor our sessions to be relevant to the specific audience. For example, a psychology class may benefit from a session about cognitive biases, while an IT class might want to talk about the non-neutrality of algorithms.  Special populations such as non-traditional students or writing center tutors could also be considered.

Chapter structure:

Each chapter of this book will be designated for a specific audience, discipline, or perspective, and be written by an author with expertise in that area.  In order to provide a foundation for the teaching librarian, it will begin with an overview of that specific aspect of fake news and be grounded in the established scholarship.  Next it will include a brief annotated list of accessible readings that could be assigned to participants ahead of a workshop when appropriate.  Authors will be asked to house a student-friendly PowerPoint version of their chapter in the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy Sandbox; the teaching librarian could use it as-is or modify it for the direct instruction portion of a session.  Finally, each chapter will include hands-on activities and discussion prompts that could be used in the actual workshop.

Final chapters will be 2,000-3,000 words in length.

Submission due dates:

Submit proposals at: https://tinyurl.com/cfpfakenews  by July 31,  2019

Notifications will be sent by September 1, 2019

Final chapters will be due by December 1, 2019

Possible chapter topics:

These are just examples of disciplines and audiences; we are open to others!

1.       Lessons by discipline

a.       Psychology

b.       Journalism/Communication

c.       History

d.       Information Technology

e.       Sociology

f.        Health Sciences

g.       Rhetoric/Composition

h.       Political Science

i.         Philosophy

j.         Business

2.       Lessons by audience

a.       Writing Center

b.       Senior Citizen groups

c.       First-year students

Proposal information:

Authors should complete the following form to submit proposals: https://tinyurl.com/cfpfakenews

Proposals will include:

1.    Discipline or audience addressed

2.    100 word abstract of proposed chapter

3.    A sample learning activity

Email teachingaboutfakenews@gmail.com with any questions.

Editors:

Candice Benjes-Small, Head of Research, and Mary K. Oberlies, Research and Instruction Librarian, William & Mary; Carol Wittig, Head of Research and Instruction, University of Richmond

2019 Texas Library Association (TLA) Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) Summit

Good Afternoon, Colleagues!
 
We are extending the call for proposals for the 2019 Texas Library Association (TLA) Library Instruction Round Table (LIRT) Summit.
 
Tell Me More.  LIRT Summit is a one-day conference focused on topics related to library and information literacy instruction in academic, public, school or special libraries.  Attendees will interact with other library instruction enthusiasts and learn from one another in a collaborative, intimate, low-stress environment.  All with an interest in library instruction and information literacy  are welcome to attend and apply to present.  
 
When and Where?  LIRT Summit will be held on September 13, 2019, at Newton Gresham Library, Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. 
 
Call for Proposals.  Please consider presenting your work at the LIRT Summit.  Proposals will be accepted until July 15, 2019, at 8:00 a.m. via this formhttps://shsu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_cx9n6eNdx19vz8h.  Any topics related to library and information literacy instruction are welcome in the following session formats:
  • 50-minute Presentation
  • 20-minute Presentation
  • 20-minute Poster Session
 
Registration Info.  Registration will open July 1, 2019, and will include breakfast and lunch for all attendees.  Additional information will be provided at a later date. 
 
 *Please excuse cross-posting*
 
Best Regards,
2019 TLA LIRT Summit Hosts
Research & Instruction Librarians
Newton Gresham Library
Sam Houston State University

Play On!

OAAr (Rare Books, Osler, Art and Archives) at the McGill Library in Montreal
invites papers and workshop proposals on the topic of play, games, and
creative engagement in education and libraries for “Play On!,” a research
colloquium taking place May 15th, 2020. The presentations should encourage
engagement and discussion. Interactive and alternative projects are
encouraged. Submit by August 1, 2019: Find out more:  https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Fmcgill.ca%2Fx%2FZph&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C6fcfd9983271452cf7a608d6e9f1a2f8%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C1%7C636953621369063542&sdata=P6%2FU0FtlGV%2B3m%2BVrgwFKJN24GrLRY0DNB3SjszYfSTQ%3D&reserved=0

Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL 

It’s that time again, folks! Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL needs *YOUR* content! We’re looking for articles, annotated bibliographies, and materials reviews! To submit, please visit the Codex website: http://codex.acrlla.org
Please make sure to read the Author’s Guidelines page (http://journal.acrlla.org/index.php/codex/about/submissions#authorGuidelines).

Deadline for submissions will be Friday, July 12, by 4:30pmRemember: you don’t have to be a librarian, work in Louisiana, or even be a member of ACRL or ACRL-LA to submit – we welcome submissions from staff, LIS students, and non-members as well! We’re all in this together! Please feel free to share this with your colleagues!

Innovations for Next Generation Libraries

Call for Proposals

The Florida Chapter of ACRL (FACRL) Conference Program Committee invites proposals for the 2019 FACRL Annual Conference exploring the theme “Innovations for Next Generation Libraries.” The conference will be held on Friday, October 18, at Nova Southeastern University Alvin Sherman Library in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Successful proposals will share new, creative, and ethically-informed approaches, that advocate equity across all levels in the academic library. From small pilot projects to campus-wide initiatives, we are interested in how libraries are engaging in campus conversations and creating new practices in areas of access, learning, technology, leadership, and collaboration.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Open access

  • Textbook affordability and OERs

  • User accessibility

  • Data and learning analytics

  • Digital projects

  • Technology in the library/classroom

Presentation and poster proposals from individuals and groups are welcome. We also invite Panel submissions in which speakers will share different views and experiences on the same topic.

Presentations and panels will be 45 minutes long, including Q&A. Poster sessions will be 25 minutes long.

Submission Information

Submit your proposal through the online submission form by June 30, 2019. The lead presenter will receive an automated email confirming receipt of the submission and will be the person notified if the proposal has been accepted.

All proposals must include the following:

  • Session Title

  • Session Description (250 words)

  • Session Format

  • Learning Objectives

  • Presenter(s) Contact Information

Proposal Timeline

  • Deadline for Submissions: June 30, 2019

  • Notification of Acceptance: August 1, 2019

  • If accepted, confirm you will present by: August 15, 2019

Criteria for Acceptance:

Proposals will be evaluated based on the following criteria:

  • Relevance to conference theme

  • Topics’ broad appeal

  • Practical learning objectives

  • Clarity of description

  • Originality

Additional Information for Presenters:

  • Benefits to presenters include a reduced registration rate for presenters ($35) and free one-year first-time membership to FACRL.

  • Conference registration includes: ACRL Project Outcomes pre-conference and breakfast/ lunch/ snacks on the day of the conference.

  • Presenters will be responsible for registering for the conference, and for arranging their own travel and lodging.

  • Presentations and posters of superior quality may be considered for future publication in The Reference Librarian, a refereed journal published by Taylor and Francis. Consider reviewing the Instructions for Authors to learn about the expectations of content and writing for this peer-reviewed journal.

Questions

Inquiries may be sent to the FACRL Conference Program Committee Co-Chairs at lisacampbell@uflib.ufl.edu or cmoran@broward.edu.

 

Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian

Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian is now accepting manuscript submissions
for volume 36:3. The submission deadline is August 16, 2019.

B&SS Librarian is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal focusing on all aspects
of behavioral and social sciences information with emphasis on librarians,
libraries and users of social science information in libraries and information
centers including the following subject areas:
Anthropology
Business
Communication Studies
Criminal Justice
Education
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Women’s Studies

And including the following areas of focus:
Assessment
Publishing trends
Technology
User behavior
Public service
Indexing and abstracting
Collection Development and evaluation
Library Administration/management
Reference and library instruction
Descriptive/critical analysis of information resources

Please consider Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian as the journal for your
publication.

The journal’s website includes Instructions to Authors at:
https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftandfonline.com%2Ftoc%2Fwbss20%2Fcurrent&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C0c922b76d9ab4ca2501a08d6e3a9e9d5%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636946716251688357&sdata=1bNBZAWHPAqID2COb%2FJbMmSFcF0tIt2c1xOdl3uSAAc%3D&reserved=0

Please send all submissions and questions to the editor at:
L-ROMERO@illinois.edu

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook

CALL FOR “RECIPES” (CHAPTER PROPOSALS)

The Teaching with Archives & Special Collections Cookbook is seeking recipes!

We are now accepting recipe proposals detailing lesson plans or projects that demonstrate the integration of archives and special collections material into the classroom. We are seeking practical guides that provide an entry point to teaching with primary sources for information professionals new to teaching and learning with archives and special collections, including archivists, special collections librarians, and instruction librarians. Additionally, we seek innovative proposals that will serve as a resource for those experienced with teaching with primary sources and archives by providing a repository of ideas for when their lesson plans need to be refreshed and updated.

Recipes will include the following:

Recipes will follow the ACRL Cookbook format. Your 600- to 800-word submission must describe a successful lesson plan or activity using archives and special collections material. Please also include:

·              Recipe name (a.k.a. your “chapter” title)

·              Your name, university or other affiliation

·              Your email address, if you would like it included with your recipe (optional)

·              Potential cookbook category, section, and part (see below)

Submission information and due dates:

Email your draft recipes to jmp48@psu.edu by July 16, 2019

Notifications will be sent out in August 2019

Final recipes will be due on October 5, 2019

Cookbook Outline:

1.       Meal Prep: Teaching Archival Literacy 

Lessons that prepare students for the situated and unique aspects of doing research in archives and special collections libraries. 

 2.       Good Orderer: Teaching Search & Discovery in Archives & Special Collections 

Lessons that help students make use of archival search and discovery tools, such as finding aids. 

3.       Food Critics: Teaching Primary Source Literacy 

 Lessons that support student analysis of primary sources. 

4.       Something from the Cart: Exhibitions as Teaching & Learning  

Lessons that utilize the exhibition of primary sources as a teaching and learning tool. 

5.       Community Picnics: K-12 & Non-course-related Instruction

      Lessons for K-12 & community audiences. 

 

6.       Takeout: Teaching with Digital Collections 

Lessons that utilize digital collections to teach primary sources literacy outside of archives and special collections libraries’ physical spaces. 

Email jmp48@psu.edu with any questions. Please refer to The Embedded Librarians Cookbook (ACRL 2014), The First Year Experience Library Cookbook (ACRL 2017), and The Library Assessment Cookbook(ACRL 2017) for examples of format and tone. We are willing to be flexible with length, wording, style, and topics.  Creativity encouraged! We look forward to your proposals!

Editor:

Julie M. Porterfield, Instruction & Outreach Archivist, Penn State University Libraries

Mind over Chatter”:Mindfulness, Media, & Misinformation in the Digital Era

Friday, September 13, 2019

Indiana University Kokomo

Kokomo, Indiana

Keynote speaker: Michael Caulfield, Director of Blended and Networked Learning, Washington State University, and author of Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers

“Falsehood is the essence of all media, extending mankind’s natural inclination to myth-making.” – Marshall McLuhan

This symposium seeks to bring together a diverse group of scholars, teachers, and thinkers from around the state of Indiana and beyond to discuss pedagogical strategies and solutions to help today’s college students cope with “network propaganda” of all kinds. In an increasingly complex, fast-moving, and confusing digital media environment rife with problematic information (mis- and disinformation, propaganda, so-called “fake news,” pseudo-science, manipulation, etc.), what are our responsibilities as teachers and literacy advocates? How might we reconceptualize our roles against a societal backdrop of declining trust in professions and institutions?

We are most interested in exploring how the practice of mindfulness—in a variety of forms and formats—can contribute to and deepen our students’ understanding of the current epistemological moment and the way misinformation flows, functions, and moves through the digital media ecosystem. Approaches may draw from any of the following topics, though presenters are encouraged to depart from and elaborate on these ideas as they see fit:

  • Using mindfulness techniques/habits of mind approaches to teach digital information literacy (e.g., confirmation bias, truth-default theory, mere exposure effect, epistemic dependence, etc.)
  • Machine learning and artificial intelligence in classroom/teaching applications
  • The epistemology/structure/theory of network propaganda, dis- and misinformation, manipulation, and the “post-Truth” era
  • The architecture of social media networks, especially as it pertains to the spread of disinformation, propaganda, and problematic information in general
  • Pedagogical approaches to digital literacy/teaching resistance to disinformation
  • Misinformation in science, medicine, and technology
  • The history of misinformation, histories of misinformation
  • Network theory and the role of networks/social media in spreading misinformation: networks and actors, algorithms, micro-targeting, actor-network theory, materiality, object-oriented rhetorics and approaches
  • Intersections between politics and misinformation

The conference organizers welcome either individual paper proposals (approx. 15 minutes) or panel presentations of 3-4 presenters (approx. 45 minutes). All sessions will be 60 minutes total with 15 minutes reserved for a robust Q & A. Please upload your proposal (500-word maximum) with contact information to this Google form by June 21, 2019 at 11:59pm EDT. Presenters will be notified of their acceptance via email no later than July 12, 2019. For any and all queries, contact the conference organizers via email at cfp19@iuk.edu.

Innovations in Information Literacy

Series Title:

Innovations in Information Literacy

Series Editor:

Trudi Jacobson, MLS, MA

Distinguished Librarian

University at Albany

Publisher:

Rowman & Littlefield

The series has a broad information literacy focus, in content and audience, as well as geographical scope. The cohering element is an emphasis on innovations within information literacy. These innovations might come from new conceptions of the evolving nature and understanding of information literacy, new teaching methods, or new pedagogical technologies.

If you have an idea for a manuscript that fits these parameters, and an interest in writing (or possibly editing) a book on the topic, please do let me know.  Send along a paragraph or two about the topic and your expertise in the area, this will be sufficient to start a conversation about your idea.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask.

Trudi Jacobson

Distinguished Librarian

Head, Information Literacy Department

University Libraries

University at Albany

(518) 442-3581

tjacobson@albany.edu