Tag Archives: Journals

The Serials Librarian

Greetings,

The Serials Librarian is currently seeking manuscripts on a rolling basis for the 2019 volume year.

The Serials Librarian is an international journal covering scholarly communications and all aspects of the serials and continuing resources management lifecycle. We publish case studies, reports, research papers, theoretical or speculative pieces, and a select number of columns.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

•       Scholarly communication issues (institutional repositories, copyright, publishing, citation studies, etc.)

•       New models for library-publisher commerce beyond “the big deal”

•       Procedural innovations in processing, organizing, assessing, and/or promoting e-resources

•       Metadata and discovery of serials and e-resources

•       Migration and implementation of systems such as ERM’s, discovery products, data visualization tools, etc., including ideas related to staffing workflows

•       Open access, whether “green,” “gold,” “diamond,” “platinum,” or hybrid

•       Peer review and the future of the journal gatekeeping function

•       End-user ease of access and usability

•       Collaborative projects related to collection development

•       Accessibility and diversity in resource management

•       Theoretical or speculative pieces addressing issues within the scope of the journal (e.g., does RDA adequately adjudicate concerns about serials title changes?)

•       The evolution of recurring issues in the field (e.g., the history of copyright and legislation devised to prevent “piracy”)

Please note that we are also interested in finding interesting content for our existing set of columns and that proposals for an entirely new column are welcome. All manuscripts should be submitted electronically to the journal’s ScholarOne website: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/WSER

Questions or other requests can be sent to the journal’s editors, Sharon Dyas-Correia and Courtney McAllister, at serialslibrarianjournal@gmail.com For more information about The Serials Librarian, including complete submission instructions, please visit the journal’s webpage: www.tandfonline.com/WSER

Sincerely,

Sharon Dyas-Correia, Editor in Chief

Courtney McAllister, Associate Editor

Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography Special Issue: The Built Environment in Pennsylvania History

https://hsp.org/publications/pennsylvania-magazine-of-history-biography/calls-for-papers

The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography is issuing a call for articles to be included in a special issue on the built environment in Pennsylvania history, scheduled for publication in October 2021.

 The editors seek submissions of the following two sorts.

 Scholarly Articles: The editors seek submissions of scholarly articles (25–35 pages, double spaced) featuring new research on the built environment in Pennsylvania history. We welcome articles on architecture, infrastructure, parks, (de)industrialization, statues, monuments, and other subjects. While certainly not limited to the following, potential authors may wish to consider these questions: How has Philadelphia’s image of itself as a “greene country towne” affected different groups of residents over time? What legacies have coal and other industries left on the state, and when and how have these developments caused conflicts with environmental advocates? How should controversial aspects of the state’s history be memorialized in public spaces? Selections will be based on both quality and the need to represent a full range of topics and time periods.

Hidden Gems: The editors seek submissions of short articles (250–750 words) featuring hidden gems highlighting unknown, underused, or misunderstood sources related to the built environment in Pennsylvania history. We invite articles focusing on both written and non-written sources, including but not limited to diaries, manuscript collections, novels, government documents, oral histories, newspapers, photographs, artifacts, monuments, and cultural sites. These items may or may not be found in the state, but they must illuminate some aspect of the built environment in Pennsylvania history. See https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5215/pennmaghistbio.142.issue-3 for examples of such essays.

Submission details: Submissions should be addressed to Christina Larocco, editor, Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography (pmhb@hsp.org).

Guest editors: Potential contributors are strongly encouraged to consult with one of the two guest editors for this issue of the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography well before the submission deadline: Elizabeth Milroy, professor and department head, Department of Art and Art History, Drexel University (em678@drexel.edu), and Randall Mason, associate professor of historic preservation, University of Pennsylvania (rfmason@design.upenn.edu).

 Deadline for submission of completed articles: January 1, 2020

Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL 

It’s that time again, folks! Codex: The Journal of the Louisiana Chapter of the ACRL needs *YOUR* content! We’re looking for articles, annotated bibliographies, and materials reviews! To submit, please visit the Codex website: http://codex.acrlla.org
Please make sure to read the Author’s Guidelines page (http://journal.acrlla.org/index.php/codex/about/submissions#authorGuidelines).

Deadline for submissions will be Friday, July 12, by 4:30pmRemember: you don’t have to be a librarian, work in Louisiana, or even be a member of ACRL or ACRL-LA to submit – we welcome submissions from staff, LIS students, and non-members as well! We’re all in this together! Please feel free to share this with your colleagues!

Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian

Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian is now accepting manuscript submissions
for volume 36:3. The submission deadline is August 16, 2019.

B&SS Librarian is a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal focusing on all aspects
of behavioral and social sciences information with emphasis on librarians,
libraries and users of social science information in libraries and information
centers including the following subject areas:
Anthropology
Business
Communication Studies
Criminal Justice
Education
Ethnic Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Social Work
Sociology
Women’s Studies

And including the following areas of focus:
Assessment
Publishing trends
Technology
User behavior
Public service
Indexing and abstracting
Collection Development and evaluation
Library Administration/management
Reference and library instruction
Descriptive/critical analysis of information resources

Please consider Behavioral & Social Sciences Librarian as the journal for your
publication.

The journal’s website includes Instructions to Authors at:
https://nam01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=https%3A%2F%2Ftandfonline.com%2Ftoc%2Fwbss20%2Fcurrent&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7C0c922b76d9ab4ca2501a08d6e3a9e9d5%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636946716251688357&sdata=1bNBZAWHPAqID2COb%2FJbMmSFcF0tIt2c1xOdl3uSAAc%3D&reserved=0

Please send all submissions and questions to the editor at:
L-ROMERO@illinois.edu

E-Resource Round Up in Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL)

This is a last call for contributions to the “E-Resource Round Up” column for volume 31, issue 3 of the Journal of Electronic Resources Librarianship (JERL). Submissions can be related to any aspect of electronic resources and their use in libraries, including conference reports, professional discussion groups, meetings, and practices in using electronic resources in-house. This would be a great opportunity for you to report on topics that may benefit others in our profession.

The editors would like to receive contributions to the column by Wednesday, May 29, 2019. Contributions should not be published elsewhere.

If you have a submission or questions, please contact the column editors:

Bob Wolverton

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-0548

bwolverton@library.msstate.edu

Karen Davidson

Mississippi State University Libraries

(662) 325-3018

kdavidson@library.msstate.edu

Journal of Play in Adulthood”

The new “Journal of Play in Adulthood” now has an open call for papers!
This new diamond open access journal (free to read and publish in) would welcome papers from information literacy practitioners and researchers. Research based articles are subject to double blind peer review, but we also welcome articles from practice, extended essays, and reviews that might be of interest to our readers.
Key topics of interest to the journal include the role of play in learning, work, our social and cultural lives, the benefits to individuals and society, and the interrelationship between play and other areas of adult life. The focus of this journal is on play in adulthood to explicitly distinguish it from children’s play, and to highlight that the motivations, contexts, and forms of play are, in many cases, different. In summary, it covers playful living, playful working, and playful learning.

Contact:

Andrew Walsh MSc MCLIP FHEA FRSA IFNTF

University Teaching Fellow, National Teaching Fellow

Academic Librarian for Education and Professional Development.

Editor of the Journal of Play in Adulthood

https://www.journalofplayinadulthood.org.uk

I

Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education journals

AACE Invites You to Submit for Publication in These Internationally Respected Journals!

 AACE Journals Include:

Submission guidelines http://publish.aace.org/begin/

AACE Publications | Email: pubs@aace.orgaace.org/pubs

Reference Services Review

Reference Services Review seeks journal article contributions for a special issue that will explore themes related to academic libraries and the 45th President of the United States. The issue will be published in January, 2020 (48/1). Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

  • the impact of misinformation, disinformation, and distrust of media outlets on library education services
  • the impact of the partial government shutdown on access to federal government information and/or services, grant funded research, etc.
  • campus climate: safety and security, free speech versus hate speech, collaboration with student organizations
  • campus/community engagement and programming
  • work with and/or support services for DACA students
  • the impact on federal government documents, e.g., removal of the phrase “climate change,” requests from federal agencies to purge historical documents and records, archiving the President’s social media posts, etc.
  • library involvement with social justice initiatives on campus
  • innovative dissemination of election, candidate, and voter registration information to constituents

The journal welcomes thought pieces, case studies, and articles about issues and trends that address specific opportunities or challenges related to academic libraries and the current administration. Potential contributors are encouraged to be creative in developing topics.

Topic proposals should be submitted to Mary Ellen Spencer via the web form at https://tinyurl.com/rsr-45th.  Please direct any questions to her at mespencer@pstcc.edu.

Journal of Applied Instructional Design

(JAID) (https://www.jaid.pub/)

issue on Instructional Design in Medical and Healthcare Education

To facilitate medical and healthcare education (including the preparation and professional development of physicians, nurses, professional staff, and administrators), educators and instructional designers must gain a critical understanding of the contemporary issues facing a wide range of professionals in a variety of schools, hospitals, clinics, and other health-related facilities. Similarly, to advance the adoption and application of instructional design methods, it is vital for healthcare professionals to value and gain knowledge of grounded, systematic design principles and practices.

This special issue of the Journal of Applied Instructional Design (JAID) will focus on research and the development of innovative training and educational programs that apply systematic instructional design tools and techniques to create engaging, effective, and efficient learning experiences. The fundamental purpose of the special issue is to nurture collaboration between academics and practitioners in instructional design and healthcare as a means of advancing learning and disseminating new ideas. Manuscripts that highlight the skills and knowledge instructional designers require to be successful in healthcare settings, or otherwise address contemporary trends and issues in healthcare that affect the analysis, design, development, implementation and/or evaluation of training and education are also welcome.

Please submit a short proposal, including a title, a one to two page summary, and an outline of the proposed manuscript to Dr. Hirumi at Atsusi.Hirumi@ucf.edu by midnight, Sunday, March 31, 2019. Selected authors will be notified by April 30 and invited to submit complete manuscripts by Friday, August 2, 2019 for publication in the October 2019 edition of JAID. Please Note: An invitation to submit a complete manuscript does not guarantee the manuscript will be published; all manuscripts must still undergo full peer review process.

Playing and Pedagogy: The Theory and Practice of Teaching with Video Games

Hello all,

I’m writing to announce a call for contributions for a special feature in Films for the Feminist Classroom.

Playing and Pedagogy: The Theory and Practice of Teaching with Video Games

Video games and films—both genres increasingly share tropes in their design, aesthetic, and reliance on narrative plots. Video games often use a short film to introduce players to the rules and characters, and action films can rely so much on computer generated imagery that it’s not clear where the computer ends and the “real world” begins. Moreover, films and video games at some times (re)produce status quo norms and hierarchies and at other times offer a path toward radical social justice. In this sense, both serve as forms of entertainment and instruction, pleasure and discomfort. And both can be useful for teaching skills, ideas, and content for educators in various settings.

Considering these similarities, Films for the Feminist Classroom (https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fffc.twu.edu%2F&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7Cc25907b16bef4499101708d687b5658e%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636845610496606759&sdata=runjDjANceZsx4HP1F4%2BLaLWlopbYQp8OaGDFDbUyys%3D&reserved=0) is developing a special feature about intersections of gaming/film/video media and pedagogy for an upcoming issue. We are looking for contributions that explore gaming in relation to pedagogy and that in some way critically engage or address hierarchies of power and privilege. We also ask contributors to consider topics relevant to gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, ability, socioeconomic class, religion, and other social, biological, and cultural influences.

We are interested in short essays (1500-2500 words), game reviews, and lesson plans that offer resources for educators who might consider using gaming in their teaching. Proposals are welcome from a range of theoretical and methodological frameworks, that span a range of fields and disciplines, and that explore various media forms, topics, and content. Educators at a variety of phases of their careers—graduate students to retired faculty—and at a variety of locations, including primary and secondary schools, colleges and universities, and community centers, as well as from different countries, are encouraged to submit a proposal.

Proposals may address but are not limited to the following areas:
— crafting a syllabus and/or a unit within a syllabus about gaming
— incorporating game design in lesson plans
— gaming assignments and/or activities that educators could use
— how different educational settings affect the media and pedagogical strategies we use
— rethinking education material and approaches with gaming
— explicitly pedagogical games
— pairing film/video media and readings
— deconstructing and analyzing video games as a class activity
— the cultural dimensions of gaming
— gamergate threats and harassment and the effect on student’s perception of gaming communities
— gender, race, class, sexuality, ability, religion, etc. in relation to video games
— social justice in gaming narratives
— the rhetoric of video games
— experimental or avant garde video games
— pairing film/video media and readings
— how video games can reinforce and disrupt norms
— the relationship between gaming and other participatory and social media platforms

Proposals should be 150-200 words and cite the specific short media you will discuss in the essay. The deadline for submitting proposals is February 20, 2019. If accepted, completed contributions will be due April 15, 2019.

Please submit proposals and direct any questions to ffc@twu.edu or to Agatha Beins at abeins@twu.edu / 940-898-2117. More information about submitting proposals can be found here: https://na01.safelinks.protection.outlook.com/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fffc.twu.edu%2Fcall_4_proposals.html&data=02%7C01%7Cdxf19%40psu.edu%7Cc25907b16bef4499101708d687b5658e%7C7cf48d453ddb4389a9c1c115526eb52e%7C0%7C0%7C636845610496606759&sdata=ZVoFyFUcufriihsokghoYDfse01FmRHnZm5ni%2FlDr6o%3D&reserved=0.

Agatha Beins
Associate Professor
Department of Multicultural Women’s and Gender Studies
Texas Woman’s University
Editor, Films for the Feminist Classroom