Tag Archives: Panels

NWSA Fat Studies Interest Group

This year the NWSA Fat Studies Interest Group is having an OPEN call for papers for the 2011 NWSA conference to be held Nov. 10-13, 2011 in Atlanta, GA. Papers on any topic at the intersection of women’s studies/feminism/gender/sexuality and fat studies will be considered.

 

At minimum, your submission should fall under one of the following themes for NWSA 2011:

 

* The Politics of Crisis

* Subverting the “Master’s” Tools?

* Deploying Feminisms

* Women’s Studies without Walls

* Creative Interventions

 

For more information on the themes, visit: http://www.nwsa.org/conference/cfp.php

 

While this is an open call, topic suggestions from last year’s meeting include: Fat Chicana Studies, Fat & Aging, Intersections of Fat: Disability, Transnational Fat Studies, New Scholarship on the Body: Regulation of Appearance, Fatness in Media Culture, Fat Feminist Activisms, Fat Studies and Pedagogy, Fat Studies Professionalization, Fatness and the Internet, and Fat Studies and Eating Disorders.

 

If you are interested in being a part of the 2011 Fat Studies panels at NWSA, please send the following info by February 13, 2011 to NWSA Fat Studies Interest Group Co-Chairs Joelle Ruby Ryan and Michaela Null: (Joelle.Ryan@unh.edu) AND (mnull@purdue.edu):

 

Name, Institutional Affiliation, Snail Mail, Email, Phone, Theme your paper fits under, Title for your talk, a one-page, double-spaced abstract in which you lay out your topic and its relevance to this session. Each person will speak for around 15 minutes, and we will leave time for Q&A.

 

As a side note, at the request of the Fat Studies Interest Group, NWSA has added ‘fat feminisms’ as a key word for the program. This means that if you submit a fat studies/fat feminism related paper or panel, you can tag it with the keyword ‘fat feminisms,’ and likewise search the 2011 program for ‘fat feminisms’ to find relevant panels. If you submit a paper or panel on your own, we encourage you to use this keyword if your paper or panel fits the bill. We thank NWSA for adding a keyword that helps conference attendees locate fat studies panels.

 

ACRL 2011 Panel Sessions

Call for Participation: ACRL 2011 Panel Sessions
 
The ACRL Panel Sessions Selection Committee invites proposal submissions for the ACRL 2011 National Conference to be held in historic Philadelphia, March 30 – April 2, 2011.
 
Panel sessions are one-hour presentations by two-to-three presenters that allow the participants to address an issue of concern to academic or research librarians. These sessions should be geared toward helping attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic through active participation. Panelists may wish to debate each other, pose questions to the audience or each other, or help the audience engage actively. Panels that include library stakeholders (faculty, IT, administrators, students, vendors, and others) are encouraged.
 
Issues and topics should address one the following conference tracks:
 
*          Diversify our Interdependence: Building Relationships
*          Evolutions in Higher Education
*          Harness Lightning: Technology in the Service of Libraries
*          Inventing Your Library’s Future
*          The Shape of Tomorrow: Liberating Collection Development
*          Unite with Users: Reinventing the User Experience
*          You Say You Want a Revolution: Next Generation Librarianship
 
The deadline for panel session proposals is May 10, 2010. 
 
Proposals may be submitted through the online proposal submission form. 
 
https://www.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2011/proposal_submission_home_1page.cfm
 
Please note that you may start and save an incomplete proposal, and edit or add additional information before the proposal deadline date.
 
More information about the conference tracks, proposal requirements and instructions, and selection criteria and presenter requirements can be found online at:
 
http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/national/2011/program/index.cfm
 
Questions about panel session submissions can be directed to:
Nicole Cooke, Montclair State University, cooken@mail.montclair.edu
Lynne King, Schenectady Community College, kinglo@sunysccc.edu
 

What is Your Library Doing about Emerging Technologies?

Call For Participation : ALA Annual at D.C. - What is Your Library Doing about Emerging Technologies? Submission link: http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dDktR2k2OUpGcGl3b1FkY3RSYjc1RlE6MA Submission deadline: April, 1, 2010 Do you directly work with emerging technologies at your library? Did you play a role in creating a librarian position for emerging technologies? Do you supervise a librarian who work with emerging technologies or have expertise in emerging technologies yourself? You don't have to hold the job title of "Emerging Technologies Librarian" to participate. If you answer yes to any of these questions, then we want to hear from you. Despite the popularity of the term, there is no clear definition or shared understanding about what "emerging technologies" mean to libraries and librarians. Almost all libraries strive to stay current with quickly changing technologies. But not all libraries have established a formal method and procedure of supporting, evaluating, implementing, and adopting emerging technologies. ALA LITA Emerging Technologies Interests Group (ETIG) is seeking participants to a panel discussion - "What are your libraries doing about emerging technologies" at ALA Annual 2010 at Washington D.C. We are particularly interested in identifying librarians, library administrators, and technology experts who can contribute to the following (but not limited) topics: * What do we mean when we say "emerging technologies"? * What motivates libraries and administrators to create a new position for "emerging technologies"? * What are the daily tasks performed or projects achieved by (emerging) technology librarians at your libraries? * What are the challenges for emerging technologies for libraries? (From both a manager's, a librarian's, or a technologist's perspective) * How do you evaluate, implement and adopt emerging technologies? * What should libraries be doing about emerging technologies? * Other thoughts about libraries and emerging technologies If you are interested, please submit your proposal by filling out this form: http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dDktR2k2OUpGcGl3b1FkY3RSYjc1RlE6MA If you have any questions, please contact Bohyun Kim (bohyun.kim@fiu.edu), ETIG member, or Jacquelyn Erdman (ERDMANJ@ecu.edu), ETIG vice Chair. 

ACRL Panel Sessions -Philadelphia

The ACRL Panel Sessions Selection Committee invites proposal 
submissions for the ACRL 2011 National Conference to be held
in historic Philadelphia, March 30 - April 2, 2011.

Panel sessions are one-hour presentations by two-to-three presenters
that allow the participants to address an issue of concern to academic
or research librarians. These sessions should be geared toward helping
attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic through active
to the audience or each other, or help the audience engage actively.
Panels that include library stakeholders (faculty, IT, administrators,
students, vendors, and others) are encouraged.

Issues and topics should address one the following conference tracks:

* Harness Lightning: Technology in the Service of Libraries
* Inventing Your Library's Future
* Diversify our Interdependence: Building Relationships
* Evolutions in Higher Education
* The Shape of Tomorrow: Liberating Collection Development
* Unite with Users: Reinventing the User Experience
* You Say You Want a Revolution: Next Generation Librarianship

The deadline for panel session proposals is May 10, 2010.

Proposals may be submitted through the online proposal submission form.

https://www.goeshow.com/acrl/national/2011/proposal_submission_home_1page.cfm

Please note that you may start and save an incomplete proposal, and edit or add
 additional information before the proposal deadline date.

More information about the conference tracks, proposal requirements and
 instructions, and selection criteria and presenter requirements can be found
 online at:

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/events/national/2011/program/index.cfm

Questions about panel session submissions can be directed to:
Nicole Cooke, Montclair State University, cooken@mail.montclair.edu
Lynne King, Schenectady Community College, kinglo@sunysccc.edu


Controlling Birth: The Politics of Pregnancy in American Culture

I’m looking for a chair and a respondent for a proposed special session for the 2011 MLA entitled “Controlling Birth: The Politics of Pregnancy in American Culture.” If you are planning on attending MLA next year and would be interested in serving as panel chair or respondent for this session, please respond off list to ginnyengholm@gmail.com. I would be happy to give you further information about the panel. Below is the panel’s call for papers.

Best,
Ginny Engholm

Doctoral Candidate
English Department
University of Kentucky

Controlling Birth: The Politics of Pregnancy in American Culture–Proposed Special Session (2011 MLA)

The term “birth control” typically refers to the various technological and behavioral mechanisms intimate couples use to prevent or limit progeny. This panel seeks papers that broaden this term to encompass the myriad ways that society engages in controlling birth. Despite the prevalent view of reproduction as an intensely intimate and personal decision, how and when couples have been able to limit or prevent reproduction have been greatly influenced by larger political concerns–debates over women’s roles in society, sexual agency, and sexual desire; eugenically-motivated historical narratives of “excess” reproduction and “race suicide;” and conflicts within the scientific and biomedical discourses of the body, pregnancy, childbirth and the professionalization of obstetrics.

Museum Computer Network 2010 Conference

The Museum Computer Network 2010 Conference Program Committee is
delighted to announce the call for proposals for MCN’s upcoming
conference in Austin, Texas, Oct 27-30, 2010. We’ll be accepting
proposals from April 5 – May 3, so start sharpening up your ideas!

This year’s innovative program will include not just a great line-up of
papers and panels on the theme of I/O: The Museum Inside-Out/Outside-In
“slow un-conference” – Seizing the Tiger by the Longtail [link to:

If the topic or problem you most urgently need to discuss with your
peers and experts in the field is not covered by the scheduled papers
and sessions, then propose an un-conference session and MCN will help
bring together the conference’s brightest and most experienced minds for
your un-conference session.

Check out the conference planning wiki for more details:

WOMEN AND RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

LOOKING FOR PANELISTS ON WOMEN AND RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY FOR THE 2011 BERKS

I have some research based on ethnographic work with a contemporary American women’s progressive religious reading group focusing on how “heretical” texts like The Gnostic Gospels and the Da Vinci Code are useful to women navigating patriarchal religious institutions.  I would like to organize a panel related to women’s religion/spirituality for the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst on 9-12 June 2011.  I am seeking 1-2 other panelists, a chair, and a discussant.  Papers can address any historical period or national/geographic tradition. 

Themes my work addresses:

How reading creates/facilitates the formation of religious community, how lay people appropriate mass media to form religious identities, lived religion, the religious left, the sacred feminine and feminist religious practices

If you might be interested in participating in such a panel, please contact me:

Erin Smith
Associate Professor of American Studies
Associate Director, Gender Studies Program
University of Texas at Dallas
erins@utdallas.edu

If interested, potential panelists should send a one-page cv and 250-word abstract to me as WORD attachments or pasted into the body of an email before March 1.  Submission deadline for completed panel proposal is 15 March.

ALA Annual at D.C. – What is Your Library Doing about Emerging Technologies?

Submission link: http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dDktR2k2OUpGcGl3b1FkY3RSYjc1RlE6MA

Submission deadline: April, 1, 2010

 

Do you directly work with emerging technologies at your library? Did you play a role in creating a librarian position for emerging technologies? Do you supervise a librarian who work with emerging technologies or have expertise in emerging technologies yourself? You don’t have to hold the job title of “Emerging Technologies Librarian” to participate.  If you answer yes to any of these questions, then we want to hear from you.

 

Despite the popularity of the term, there is no clear definition or shared understanding about what “emerging technologies” mean to libraries and librarians.  Almost all libraries strive to stay current with quickly changing technologies. But not all libraries have established a formal method and procedure of supporting, evaluating, implementing, and adopting emerging technologies.

 

ALA LITA Emerging Technologies Interests Group (ETIG) is seeking participants to a panel discussion – “What are your libraries doing about emerging technologies” at ALA Annual 2010 at Washington D.C. We are particularly interested in identifying librarians, library administrators, and technology experts who can contribute to the following (but not limited) topics:

 

*    What do we mean when we say “emerging technologies”?

*    What motivates libraries and administrators to create a new position for “emerging technologies”?

*    What are the daily tasks performed or projects achieved by (emerging) technology librarians at your libraries?

*    What are the challenges for emerging technologies for libraries? (From both a manager’s, a librarian’s, or a technologist’s perspective)

*    How do you evaluate, implement and adopt emerging technologies?

*    What should libraries be doing about emerging technologies?

*    Other thoughts about libraries and emerging technologies

 

If you are interested, please submit your proposal by filling out this form: http://spreadsheets.google.com/viewform?formkey=dDktR2k2OUpGcGl3b1FkY3RSYjc1RlE6MA

 

If you have any questions, please contact Bohyun Kim (bohyun.kim@fiu.edu), ETIG member, or Jacquelyn Erdman (ERDMANJ@ecu.edu), ETIG vice Chair.

 

Women, Political Engagement, and the Artistic Imagination

We seek 1-2 panelists for our panel titled Women, Political 
Engagement, and the Artistic Imagination, to be proposed to the 
National Women’s Studies Association Conference, November 11-14, 
Denver, CO.  Panel description is below. If you would like to join us, 
please submit a title and abstract to either Kim or Heather by Feb. 
18th.

Panel co-chairs and contact:

Heather Hewett, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and English, 
SUNY New Paltz: hewetth@newpaltz.edu

Kim Miller, Assistant Professor of Women’s Studies and Art History, 
Wheaton College, Norton, MA: miller_kim@wheatoncollege.edu

Women activists world-wide have long engaged in movements for social 
change through their work in creative production and the arts. 
Likewise, there is also a rich and complex history of textual/ aesthetic representations of women’s political lives. Yet, women’s 
artistic and creative contributions do not always fully “count” as 
knowledge in the academy, just as women’s political work is often 
overlooked or dismissed in both grass roots movements and within 
governments. Scholarly discussions about the significance of women’s 
creative expressions and cultural production are even marginalized 
within the field of Women’s Studies.

This panel seeks to bring together recent and ongoing research on the 
intersection of women’s political participation and textual/aesthetic 
representation related to local, national, or transnational issues.

Panelists might consider some of the following topics or questions:

• How is creative representation used to influence political 
struggles, or how has political need affected women’s creative 
expression?

• How have women ­ individually or in groups ­ employed representation 
as a form of resistance against political oppression?

• What roles does women’s cultural production play in social justice 
work? How might this work challenge the distinct categories of 
politics and art, critical theory and creative expression?

• What does current research tell us about feminist cultural production?

• What kind of new questions or knowledges does their work provide, 
and how are these knowledges being integrated in Women’s Studies 
classrooms?

• What resources are available to Women’s Studies instructors who seek 
to integrate creative cultural production and the arts into their 
research, teaching, and activism? What barriers and obstacles remain?

All best,

Heather

Heather Hewett, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, English and Women’s Studies
Coordinator, Women’s Studies Program
State University of New York at New Paltz

Reimagining Girlhood: Communities, Identities, Self-Portrayals

Kristen Lambert and Alyx Vesey are organizing a panel to submit to the
Conference on *Reimagining Girlhood: Communities, Identities,
Self-Portrayals *
Hosted by: Center for Gender and Intercultural Studies and Women’s Studies
Program at the State University of New York College at Cortland and to be
held on October 22 ­ 24, 2010.

We are putting together a panel that highlights the curriculum and
programming utilized in Girls Rock Camp – including but not limited to
courses and workshops on:

– music history
– media literacy
– band marketing and promotions
– music journalism
– recording
– self-defense

We hope the panel will bridge scholarship with activism, and that as a group
we can discuss girls and feminism, identity politics, and girl empowerment
in relation to the curriculum created and implemented in Girls Rock Camp. As
GRC hopes to work with a diverse group of girls in terms of race, gender
identity, sexuality, class, and age we would like to discuss how successful
the workshops and trainings are in relation to the overall goals outlined by
the organizations and where we could make improvements. In this respect we
envision the panel as an opportunity to create a dialogue with each other
across various camps.

We hope to hear from volunteers and instructors from Girls Rock Camp,
scholars and activists who are studying Girls Rock Camp, and of course
girls(!) who’ve participated in Girls Rock Camp.

We are asking that potential panelists please submit an abstract limited to
250 words to us by Sunday, February 21, 6pm eastern time. Please email both
of us: Kristen (k.lamb16@gmail.com) and Alyx (Alyx.Vesey@gmail.com). Along
with the proposal please include the name(s), affiliation(s), CVs (if
applicable) and contact information (address, e-mail and telephone number)
associated with the proposal.

We understand that this is short notice but the submission deadline is March
1st, so we need to time to read submitted proposals and prepare the panel
submission.

Thanks and we look forward to hearing from you!

Kristen Lambert and Alyx Vesey co-teach the music history workshops for
Girls Rock Camp Austin, and have also worked with GenAustin. Both received
their MA in Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2008,
where they were both portfolio students through the Center of Women and
Gender Studies. In addition to their scholarship and work with GRCA, they
also maintain blogs that reflect their academic interests. Kristen runs Act
Your Age <http://actyourage09.wordpress.com/>, which focuses on mediated
representations of girlhood, as well as non-profit girl-oriented
organizations and current events related to girlhood. Alyx runs Feminist
Music Geek <http://feministmusicgeek.com/>, which considers music culture
from a feminist perspective.
For more information on the conference please visit their website: