RCL #10 HofPC Concept Contracts

The History of Capital Punishment

HofPC Concept Contract for Nebraska Hernandez, Roan Lynch, Mark Ma, Ninad Mahajan, Andrew Pei, and Billy Young

 

Topic: The controversy surrounding capital punishment and the use of the death penalty in the United States.

 

An examination of the moral, social, and economic implications of the death penalty in the United States. Analyzes the extensive history of capital punishment and torture as well as their psychological effects on civilizations and mentalities. As a society, should we keep the death penalty? How much is a life worth?

 

Research, Roles, and Responsibilities:

Nebraska: The ancient history of torture and capital punishment as a means of interrogation. Nebraska will research whether the original intentions of the death penalty have changed. He will also examine public outcry to these methods prior to the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Nebraska is responsible for helping to create the storyboard of the video.

 

Roan: Modern, recent tactics of torture and capital punishment as used by police authorities and the government. Roan will also research whether the original intentions of the death penalty have changed. He is responsible for analyzing the current, present-day controversy and debate over the U.S. death penalty. Roan is also responsible for helping to create the storyboard of the video.

 

Mark: Potential rationales and justifications for the use of torture, capital punishment, and the death penalty. Mark will act as the mediator between both sides of the controversy, researching the reasons for each side feels the way it does. Mark is also responsible for researching individual stories and case studies of the death penalty, diving into the lives of prisoners and their families who may be directly affected by the death penalty. Mark is responsible for editing the video and adding appropriate graphics and visual aids.

 

Andrew: The economic effects of the death penalty. Andrew will analyze the fiscal impact of using capital punishment throughout history, and most important, in the last decade. Andrew will research the financial costs of death row and the prison system as a whole. He will then compare the costs of the death penalty with alternatives researched and analyzed by Ninad. Andrew is responsible for providing narration and related audio services for the video.

 

Ninad: Potential alternatives to the death penalty. Ninad is responsible for researching probable solutions and proposed alternatives to capital punishment, spanning hundreds of years of history. Ninad’s research is important because it will add or diminish credibility to the arguments for using the death penalty. Ninad is also responsible for editing the video and adding finishing touches.

 

Billy: The moral and ethical ramifications of using the death penalty, as well as how the use of torture and capital punishment may violate intrinsic human rights. Billy will explore the philosophy behind the death penalty as well as examine the underlying mentalities surrounding its purpose. He is responsible for explaining the psychological and philosophical effects of the death penalty spanning decades of its use. Billy will argue whether or not the rationales and justifications researched by Mark are supported by the death penalty’s moral implications. Billy is responsible for providing narration with Andrew and editing the video using Adobe Premiere Pro.

 

Signed,

Nebraska Hernandez

Roan Lynch

Mark Ma

Ninad Mahajan

Andrew Pei

RCL #9 TED Scripts (Draft)

In 1967, the United States Supreme Court unanimously struck down a ban on interracial marriage in the famous Loving v. Virginia case. This case set the precedent and reinforced the idea that everyone has a right to marry whomever they desire.

The County Judge Leon M. Bazile, of which the Loving case originated,  stated:

Almighty God created the races white, black, yellow, malay and red, and he placed them on separate continents. And but for the interference with his [arrangement] there would be no cause for such marriages. The fact that he separated the races shows that he did not intend for the races to mix (Bazile 1).

Obviously, we have advanced in thought since then.

Within the TED talk tell an anecdote from the book, Marriage Across the Color Line by Clotye M. Larsson. Chose either “A Mississippi Story” from page 117 or “Prosecution in New York” from page 120.

Both stories deal with the prosecution of interracial couples in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The stories will provide an interesting first-hand account of how far society has developed since then.

Besides anecdotal evidence, employing statistics would strengthen the analysis of the paradigm shift of interracial marriage. According to multiple sources, the acceptance of interracial relationships has risen dramatically over the years. Likewise, the partaking in interracial marriages has increased exponentially compared to half a century ago.

Include these sources for statistics: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-interracial-marriage-study-met-20170518-story.html

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/11/30/247530095/are-you-interested-dating-odds-favor-white-men-asian-women

An interesting idea that could be brought up is the fetishization of interracial babies begot from interracial marriages. Even if interracial marriages are accepted, stereotypes still exist around the beauty of “mixed babies.”

Overall, the United States is progressing in many different sectors of cultural and civic life; interracial marriage just happens to be one of those sectors. In the past, interracial marriage threatened the security of “white supremacy.” Why? Because if desegregation was not bad enough, sexual relations between different races exposed the populace to the realities of life: love unbounded by hate.

 

 

 

Paradigm Shift Rough Draft

A Paradigm Shift: Interracial Marriage

In 1965, Clotye Murdock Larsson wrote, “Intermarriage is the most provocative word in the English language” (5).  From then, until now, this has been an irrefutable truth. Nonetheless, this truth has not always been accepted. The shift from banning interracial marriage to widespread acceptance within a generation is nothing short of a miracle. The paradigm shift in regards to interracial marriage has removed stigmas attached to the romantic lives of a significant portion of the United States, and the World. As time marches on, so does the further acceptance of interracial marriage. Something that once signified as a social taboo is little more than formality on paperwork now.

  • Miscegenation Laws within the United States
  • Significant exceptions to miscegenation laws
  • Virginia v. Loving dictates that laws banning interracial marriage are unconstitutional
  • Interracial Marriage post-Loving
  • Statistics on the number of interracial couples in the United States
  • Repeal of miscegenation laws outside the United States
  • The fetishization of interracial babies from interracial marriages

Include the following sources:

  1. Marriage Across the Color Line- Clotve Larrson
  2. Interracial Marriage, Migration, and Loving- Deniz Gevrek
  3. Changing Patterns of Interracial Marriage in a Multiracial Society- Zhenchao Qian, Daniel T, Lichter
  4. An Overview of Statistics on Interracial Marriage in the United States, with Data on Its Extent from 1963-1970- Thomas P. Monahan
  5. Navigating Interracial Borders: Black-White Couples and Their Social Worlds- Erica Childs
  6. http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/ct-interracial-marriage-study-met-20170518-story.html
  7. http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2013/11/30/247530095/are-you-interested-dating-odds-favor-white-men-asian-women

Regardless of belief system or racial tendencies, it is evident to everyone that there has been a stark shift in regards to the acceptance of interracial marriage both in the United States and abroad. Over the past century, it has transformed from the illegal of miscegenation into an endearing one that shows the love of two people becoming one. A shift of thought that has progressed our society for the better.

It’s What I Do RCL #7- A Picture Is Worth 1,000 Words

Lynsey Addario places the most moving photographs into her book, It’s What I Do. Obviously, I would expect nothing less than perfection from a Pulitzer-Prize winning photographer.

Personally, I believed the two images below, taken from the book in between pages 210 and 211, speak to Lynsey Addario’s message and overall creative genius.

On the left is a picture of women peacefully sitting. The image is so powerful due to the casting of light across the faces of the women. Also, the blowing sheer fabric is really magical and suggests a fantasy world where the violence that Addario captured doesn’t exists, a quintessential juxtaposition. Furthermore, it recalls the early days of Addario’s photography in the remote areas of Afghanistan. Due to her being a woman, she was one of the first “Western” photographers to capture Afghan women in their homes. These women pictured may or may not be Afghani, as there was no caption provided for the photo.

On the right is a picture of a boy crying. Any picture of a child’s sadness projects a deep sorrow in the viewer. After all, a child experiencing the horrors of war is the worst form of losing innocence. The sadness in his eyes can not adequately be manifested in words for his eyes tell a story that many are unlikely to bear witness to. It seems that this photograph also underlines Addario’s purpose for photography: to fight against injustice.

Now, there are many ways to incorporate images into my blog. For those who do not know, my blog is about the injustices committed by the Supreme Court. I can easily utilize photographs of historical moments at the Supreme Court. I mean, who hasn’t seen this photo:

If a picture is worth a thousand words, and our word limit is three to five hundred, it is time to start using more pictures.

Rhetorical Analysis Essay

The Puerto Rican flag highlights the intense pride of Boricuas in their culture and heritage. Never forgetting where you came from, La Isla de Encanta, stays within the hearts of all Puerto Ricans, even those in the diaspora. A famous Puerto Rican, Lin-Manuel Miranda, transformed this pride into a musical about Latinos. In the Heights, perpetuates the pride of being Puerto Rican, and the pride of Latinos in general, with an emotional story line and moving lyrics. Both the Flag and the Musical present commonplaces and pathos to connect to Puerto Ricans, as well as any person with ears, compelling them to engage civically within their communities and elsewhere. This connection can not be stopped by a docile federal government nor a destructive hurricane.

Close your eyes and imagine yourself in the eyes of a migrant. A person, full of dreams, in a world where dreams are crushed everyday. However, you turn your eyes towards a land across the waves, a land where dreams supposedly come true. You see New York City across the waves. Lady Liberty beckons you with her torch and proclaims, “Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, the wretched refuse of your teeming shore. Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me, I lift my lamp beside the golden door!” Millions of people before you, as will millions of people after you, look at this statue as a promise. This unbreakable promise of a better life where you can create a legacy by passing down your story through your posterity. Never lacking in faith, you deem this the greatest triumph. This idea is the plight of the Puerto Rican.

La Bandera de Boricua (The Puerto Rican flag)

Lin-Manuel Miranda realized this when inscribing those papers that held the words from In the Heights like a bassinet cradles a baby.

To comprehend the similarities between the Puerto Rican flag and In the Heights, it is necessary to gain a basic knowledge of both.

The Puerto Rican flag was created in the late 19th and early 20th centuries to represent the people on the island of Puerto Rico. It encompasses the passions and dreams of the relatively subjugated people on the island and their descendants on the mainland United States. The most important part of the flag lies in the star, which represents the island, which is left out of the United States flag, even though it is apart of the country.

Meanwhile, the show takes place in the Hispanic community of Washington Heights in New York City, specifically Manhattan. The main character, Usnavi desires to return to his birth-country, the Dominican Republic, to open up a bar and serve margaritas until he dies. Sadly, he is also in love with Vanessa, a beauty parlor stylist who will never leave New York City. Adding to the complicated love story, is the star-crossed lovers: Benny and Nina. Coming from different worlds, their love is complicated and forbidden by Nina’s father. Another subplot is the story of Abuela Claudia, who just won a lottery ticket for $96,000. Overall, the musical depicts the stories of immigrants through song and dance.

Tony Award winning musical: In The Heights

Throughout the musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda utilizes universal motifs: family, love, and strife that shapes us all. In that same manner, the Puerto Rican flag does the same. It symbolizes the struggle in face of adversity and the love of family that can triumph over it.

Never in all of history have two different objects displayed this tale of humankind like the Puerto Rican Flag and Miranda’s Musical. Throughout the musical, Miranda writes different lyrics that depict this story flawlessly.

The way they whispered to each other about the warmer winter weather, inseparable, even got sick together. They never got better, passed away the December, and left me with these memories like dying embers from a dream I can’t remember. Ever since then it’s like another day deeper in debt with different dilemmas…abuela I don’t know how I can keep it together….Remember the story of your name…the day your family came.

Everyone, no matter what color, creed, or culture, can identify with the existential crisis Miranda depicts here. Why did our ancestors leave their home country and come here (United States)? What are we defined by? Should we assimilate into the mainstream culture or salvage the leftovers of our own? Miranda suggests to seek wisdom from our abuelas, our grandmothers; after all, their white hairs symbolize wisdom, not age.

This compliments the ideas portrayed by the Puerto Rican flag. After centuries of interracial marriages and culture clash, Puerto Ricans struggle with their identities. Are they Native Americans (Taíno specifically), African American, or Spainard? The answer: a mixture of all. However, the confusion does not stop there. For if you belong in the Diaspora, are you really Puerto Rican? If you have never drank coquito (alcoholic beverage) in Carolina (city in Puerto Rico) during Christmas or heard the coquí, (frog) croak during the night, are you really Puerto Rican? All these quandaries have pestered the Puerto Rican people for generations. In the end, the true identity does not matter because all Puerto Ricans are family, just like Miranda suggests.

Family

Later on in the musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda drops another seemingly commonplace idea:

Everything is easier when you’re home.

Obviously, any sane human loves their home. The old adage differentiates a house from a home. A house is a structure; a home is that plus the love inside. Even if you are hundreds of miles away, or down the road, humans, no matter who they are, desire to return to the familiarity of home at the end of the day.

This intense passion for the security of a familiar location is transcended to Puerto Ricans. The desire of many Puerto Ricans to visit Puerto Rico is underlined in the exhalation of the Puerto Rican flag. The star on the flag symbolizes the island from which the Diaspora originates; thus, all desire to stand on the white beaches and listen to the coquí, sing once again.

Yet again, Lin-Manuel Miranda poses another common thought: what would have happened if my forefathers stayed where they were.

When I was younger I’d imagine what would happen if my parents had stayed in Puerto Rico. Who would I be if I had never seen Manhattan? If I lived in Puerto Rico with my people, my people…working harder, learning Spanish, learning all I can.”

Clearly, these lyrics can also be expanded to include any number of races and ethnicities. With so many diverse groups in New York, Miranda expands the questioning of cultural identity to everyone there.

However, the musical specifically states Puerto Rico. This idea is one of the strongest connections between the musical and the flag. Puerto Ricans in the diaspora struggle with identity, some not knowing Spanish, seeking to find their place in the world. What would have happened if our parents stayed in Puerto Rico? This idea further connects with the general populace as well, since human thinking tends to fall to the pondering of “what-ifs”.

In the second act, Lin-Manuel Miranda connects the two objects, the lyrics and the flag, with incredible ease.

“Alza la bandera, la bandera dominicana! Alza la bandera, la bandera puertorriqueña! Alza la bandera, la bandera mexicana! Alza la bandera, la bandera cubana! Pa’ribba esa bandera! álzala donde quiera! Recuerdo de mi tierra! Me acuerdo de mi tierra! Esa bonita bandera! Contiene mi alma entera! Y cuando yo me muera, entiérrame en mi tierra. From Puerto Rico to Santo Domingo wherever we go we rep our people and the beat goes!”

[Raise the flag, the Dominican flag! Raise the flag, the Puerto Rican flag! Raise the flag, the Mexican flag. Raise the flag, the Cuban flag! Raise that flag where you want! Memory of my land, I remember my land! That beautiful flag! It contains my entire soul! And when I die, bury me in my land. From Puerto Rico to Santo Domingo wherever we go we rep our people and the beat goes!]

 

Carnival Del Barrio- Scene in Act 2 of In the Heights

By emphasizing the flag through written word, he compliments the meaning of both. In raising the flag, the lyrics dictate its importance. Wherever the flag’s people go, the flag, and all the sentiments surrounding it, also go. Through these words he describes the plight of the Puerto Rican, and by default, everyone else.

Overall, the commonplaces established by both the Puerto Rican flag and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights are one in the same. Telling a story of triumph, tragedy, and family, both artifacts dictate the importance of something to call your own, whether it be a flag or a home away from home. The pathos connected to the Puerto Rican flag is underlined by the musical’s lyrics and scenes. However, this is not to say that the musical only extols the Puerto Rican flag. Afterall, the musical’s wide ranging spectrum of inclusivity ends up applying to all people, of all flags.

 

 

 

Works Cited

Denis, Nelson A. War against All Puerto Ricans: Revolution and Terror in America’s Colony. Nation Books, A Member of the Perseus Books Group, 2015.

Desk, BWW News. “IN THE HEIGHTS And Ghostlight Records Host Talkback Event.”BroadwayWorld.com, BroadwayWorld.com, 14 Jan. 2009, www.broadwayworld.com/article/IN-THE-HEIGHTS-And-Ghostlight-Records-Host-Talkback-Event-20090114.

Lazarus, Emma. “The New Colossus by Emma Lazarus.” Poetry Foundation, Poetry Foundation, www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/46550/the-new-colossus.

Miranda, Lin-Manuel. “In the Heights- A New Musical.” New York City, Broadway.

Rivera, Magaly. “Puerto Rico’s Flag.” Welcome to Puerto Rico!, 2017, welcome.topuertorico.org/reference/flag.shtml.

 

 

 

RCL #6 It’s What I Do- A Kind of Balance

In part III of her book, Addario comes to a profound conclusion. She muses, “The sadness and injustice I encountered as a journalist could either sink me into a depression or open the door to a vision of my own life. I chose the latter.”

Honestly, anyone can connect to this idea. The world is a corrupt place with corrupt institutions ran by corrupt people. Everyone is affected by this corruption and injustice. Addario establishes an emotional connection to her audience by suggesting a commonplace: that of injustice.

My passion blog, “Oyez, Oyez, Oyez…Oh No.”, is a pun on the announcement of the Supreme Court members into the chamber. Oyez symbolizes an institution defined by tradition and morals. However, as aforementioned, all institutions are inherently corrupt, spurring on my addition of the “Oh No”.

I utilize Addario’s sentiment of injustice propelling her passion in my own blog, highlighting the injustices inflicted by the Supreme Court. Whether it be racial, gender, or age discrimination, the Court has a good and a bad ruling on everything.

Personally, I have faced the problems of injustice that Addario explains. In 7th grade a junior called me a spic. When eating at Cracker Barrel an older man and his son got up and left after my grandfather and I sat down. An older lady told my dad to “go back to where you come from before Trump deports you” while he was delivering her mail.

But you see,

I remain steadfast. I do not let these petty comments define me; they propel me. I am active politically and will remain so. My blog exemplifies this, as does Addario’s book. And whether I am apart of the “highest Court in the Land” or the man on the corner screaming “the end is nye,” you are going to hear my opinion, and I don’t need your validation.

Rhetorical Analysis Draft RCL #5

The Puerto Rican flag highlights the intense pride of Boricuas in the culture and heritage. Never forgetting where you came from, La Isla de Encanta, stays within the hearts of all Puerto Ricans, even those in the diaspora. A famous Puerto Rican, Lin-Manuel Miranda, transformed this pride into a musical about Latinos. In the Heights, perpetuates the pride of being Puerto Rican, and Latino, with an emotional story line and moving lyrics. Both the Flag and the Musical present commonplaces and ethos to connect to Puerto Ricans, as well as any person with ears, compelling them to engage civically within their communities and elsewhere.

Body Paragraph 1:

The way they whispered to each other about the warmer winter weather, inseparable, even got sick together. They never got better, passed away the December, and left me with these memories like dying embers from a dream I can’t remember. Ever since then it’s like another day deeper in debt with different dilemmas…abuela I don’t know how I can keep it together….Remember the story of your name…the day your family came.

– Everyone, no matter what culture or belief system, can identify with existential crises. Furthermore, everyone seeks wisdom from their abuelas, their grandmothers, because their white hairs don’t just symbolize age but wisdom.

  • Compare this idea to existential crises of the Puerto Rican people…symbolized by flag

Body Paragraph 2:

Everything is easier when you’re home.

  • It is amongst the bounds of the human condition to enjoy your home. Whether it be hundreds of miles away or down the road, humans, no matter who they are, desire to return to familiarity at the end of the day.
  • This compares to the desire of many Puerto Ricans to visit Puerto Rico, underlined in the exhalation of the Puerto Rican flag.

 

Body Paragraph 3:

When I was younger I’d imagine what would happen if my parents had stayed in Puerto Rico. Who would I be if I had never seen Manhattan? If I lived in Puerto Rico with my people, my people…working harder, learning Spanish, learning all I can.”

  • This sentiment goes along with body paragraph number two.
  • Many Puerto Ricans in the diaspora struggle with identity, some not knowing Spanish, seeking to find their place in the world. What would have happened if our parents stayed in Puerto Rico (or elsewhere)? This idea can connect with the general populace as well, since human thinking is guarded to the pondering of “what-ifs”.

Body Paragraph 4:

Alza la bandera…La Bandera de Puertoriqueña…Pa’ribba esa bandera…recuerdo mi tierra…y cuando yo me muera…Entiérrame en mi tierra! From Puerto Rico to Santo Domingo wherever we go we rep our people and the beat goes!”

[Raise the flag, the Puerto Rican flag, Raise this flag, I remember my land, and when I die, bury me in my land.”

  • This song lyric is the clearest connection between the musical and the Puerto Rican flag.
  • In raising the flag, the lyrics dictate its importance. Wherever the flag’s people go, the flag, and all the sentiments surrounding it, also go.

Conclusion: The Puerto Rican flag and the musical, In the Heights, portray the Puerto Rican experience in a way that is universally civic.

Civic Artifact Speech RCL #4

Puerto Rico, a commonwealth, an island with not a lot of wealth and not quite a nation.  The place where you vacation, a tropical destination, to escape your harsh reality. But, the reality is, the island has been under attack since its inception. Nevertheless, the most important symbol that unites her children and grandchildren, both on the island and in the diaspora, is La Bandera de Boricua, the Puerto Rican flag. The Flag portrays itself as a “North Star” to all Puerto Ricans; it is a light in the darkness of discrimination. The Flag beckons its audience by exploiting the historical pathos connected to it and establishing the commonplace of a home away from home.

The History of Puerto Rico

  • Pedro Albizu Campos and nationalist figures
  • Discrimination and abuse of power
  • Combining previous sentiments to highlight flag’s importance

The Diaspora

  • Puerto Rican Parade in NYC on 5th Avenue
  • Commonplace: houses with flags, Yankees hats, domino games
  • Flag stands for family

 

Once a friend made a comment about the Puerto Rican flag hanging in my dorm. She asked, “why don’t you just have an American flag, since Puerto Rico is a part of the United States?” I asked her which of the 50 stars on the flag stand for my beloved island. The simple answer: none. We made our own flag with our own star. Through the shining light of emotional connection and commonplaces, the Puerto Rican flag leads the weary Boricua home.

RCL #3 Writing From a War

From pages 116-123 of Addario’s book, the text is exceedingly interesting. This is somewhat due to the immense amount of potential violence but mostly because of how Addario portrays it.

First, Addario manifests into written language the palpable tension by utilizing syntax. Her sentence structure during questioning (page 118) displays a quick back-and-forth conversation by being concise. Furthermore, she choses to use quotes to draw in the audience into the first person narrative. Addario could have easily summarized this part, but its importance is emphasized by the expert usage of syntax.

Second, Addario illustrates the vivid scene by carefully manipulating diction. For example, she repeats the phrase “Oh my God” ten times on page 118. This depicts the intensity of the moment. It beckons to be recognized due to its repetition; a reader can’t ignore this.

Most importantly is Addario’s use of italicization in this section. It separates her innermost thoughts from the outside world, a peak into the mind of the author. A technique that builds an emotional connection between the reader and author, the italicization plays an important role in understanding not only the scene, but also her character development.

In my own writing, I can easily incorporate Addario’s techniques regarding syntax and diction.

I am blogging about law and the Supreme Court; thus, the structure of words is of utmost importance. The power of innocence and guilt, lies within the accuser or defender’s rhetoric. To accurately convey a case I must employ syntax and diction with great caution and skill.For example, I can use diction when persuading the reader that my point is correct. If a person or institution is guilty, I can lace the text with the word “guilty”.

Overall, Addario is an outstanding author, both with the camera and the pen. She is a perfect picture to base my own art off of.

RCL #2- If a Picture is Worth a Thousand Words, What is a Photographer Worth?

Lynsey Addario passionately follows the spirit of photography wherever it may take her. In her book, she dictates the story of a missed chance at love, not to throw a pity-party, but to emphasize a life not lived. This story, her Nana’s story, portrays the bane of human existence:

What is the point?

Lynsey ponders this question as she discovers her life at a crossroads. Should she settle down with Uxval or follow her true love of photography? Obviously, after the contemplation of her Nana’s story, Lynsey chose love.

A love that cannot be satisfied by another person, but can be tamed only by the persual of an intangible passion.

Everyone should strive to find such a spirit of perseverance and adoration of one thing. Life itself can’t and shouldn’t be devoid of purpose. Without purpose, life is not lived to the utmost. Albeit, this is, and always will be, the greatest quandary of humankind.

Now, what type of earth-shattering event did I experience to enliven my life with the exhalation of law? Perhaps my love of history. My fondness towards the subject was fostered throughout my academic life, and to pinpoint any event as the catalyst would exclude the plethora of people that inspired me.

This is not to say I do not have any muses. I would propose that my grandfather, Jose Antonio Hernandez, is the closest thing to it. His life has occurred in various places while experiencing a number of historical events. His life is a history book. Taking place in Harlem, the Bronx, Washington D.C., Europe, and Puerto Rico, his story is an endearing testimony to history. His stories during my childhood inspired a historical fascination, an obsession that transformed into a love for law and justice.

Addario’s passion is photography, her tool a camera. My passion is justice, my tool a scale.

Skip to toolbar