New exhibit ‘From the Trenches: The Great War in Sepia’ opens

World War I soldiers standing in trenches

This image is one of 55 on display from original glass-plate stereographic photographs in the Keystone View Company’s World War I Stereographic Views Collection.

A view into the humanity and tragedy of World War I through rare battlefield images comprises “From the Trenches: The Great War in Sepia,” a new exhibit located in the Eberly Family Special Collections Library, 103 Paterno Library. The exhibit will be on display through Friday, May 5.

“From the Trenches: The Great War in Sepia,” recognizes the centennial anniversary of America’s entry into the “Great War,” and captures the perspective of the common foot soldier. The images on display draw from more than 350 archived images taken from the original glass-plate stereographic photographs in the Keystone View Company’s World War I Stereographic Views Collection.

Also on display in the Special Collections Library are World War I patriotic recruitment posters digitally reproduced from the originals in the War Posters Collection. The posters highlight the significant role women played in supporting the Allied war effort and reveal the government’s skillful appropriation of the feminine ideal for wartime propaganda.

The full article is available on the Penn State News website.

2 thoughts on “New exhibit ‘From the Trenches: The Great War in Sepia’ opens

  1. James Quigel

    Hi, Chris. I am responding as the curator for this exhibit. I could not gain access to view any of the images held by the Sactuary Wood Museum, Hill 62 Zillebeke. But the archived images contained within our own Keystone View Company WWI set were most likely derived from many different sources and repositories. It is not beyond the realm of possibility that “our” set could duplicate or be derivative of some of the images held by other repositories/archives in Europe. It is unlikely that the Sanctuary Wood Museum would hold an exact set of the 350+ images we have The Keystone View Company was in the business of marketing the World War I glassplate stereoviews for educational use so there could be other sets out there as well. That’s the best I can answer in response to your question

  2. Chris Everaert

    Are these the same images that are on display at the Sanctuary Wood Museum – Hill 62 Zillebeke?

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