Category Archives: News

Penn State University Press announces Graphic Mundi imprint

By: Cate Fricke

Graphic Mundi, a new trade imprint of comics for adults and young adults, will launch in Spring 2021. With the mission of “drawing our worlds together,” the imprint will feature both fiction and nonfiction narratives on subjects such as health and human rights, politics, the environment, science, and technology. Kendra Boileau, Assistant Director and Editor-in-Chief of Penn State University Press, is the publisher.

About her vision for the imprint, Boileau says, “Graphic Mundi will represent a broad range of voices and experiences, including those of marginalized individuals and groups, or those whose
works have not been previously accessible to anglophone readers. These graphic novels will address serious topics, but they’ll do so in engaging, provocative, and sometimes humorous ways. They’ll have the potential to transform how we see ourselves, others, and the world. The imprint is thus an excellent fit for our mission as a university press.”

Graphic Mundi expands on the current list of critically acclaimed graphic novels published by Penn State University Press, in particular its Graphic Medicine series, which launched in 2015
with the Eisner Award–nominated Graphic Medicine Manifesto. The Graphic Medicine series currently includes twenty-two active and forthcoming titles that speak to the power of visual narrative to tell complex stories about personal and public health.

The Spring 2021 titles for Graphic Mundi are: COVID Chronicles: A Comics Anthology, a collection edited by Boileau and Rich Johnson of more than forty short works about the
pandemic from mainstream and indie creators, including Ignatz Award and Eisner Award winners. Three graphic narratives of personal trauma: a sudden diagnosis of quadriplegia in Twister, by Roland Burkart; an overwhelming eating disorder in Fat, by Regina Hofer; and a child’s account of living with a mother with bipolar disorder in The Parakeet, by Espé.
Crude: A Memoir, by Pablo Fajardo, Sophie Tardy-Joubert, and Damian Roudeau, recounts the fight for social and environmental justice in the Amazonian oil fields. Dirty Biology: The X-Rated Story of the Science of Sex, by Léo and Colas Grasset, and The Body Factory: From the First Prosthetics to the Augmented Human, by Héloïse Chochois, humorously explore the biology of sex and the history of human amputation and augmentation.

Award-winning cartoonist and graphic novelist Ted Rall notes that “the graphic novel revolution has brought comics out of the humor ghetto to the front of the store. The greatest potential
for the format is in serious, intelligent takes on nonfiction, fiction, politics, and memoir that treat comics as literature,which is why I believe in the mission of Graphic Mundi. Not only
will these books be an excellent addition to readers’ bookshelves; they’ll also make our world a better place, one book at a time.”

Graphic Mundi is an imprint of Penn State University Press. Founded in 1956, Penn State University Press publishes high-quality books, journals, and graphic novels of interest to
scholars and general readers, with a focus on the humanities and social sciences. Learn more at psupress.org.

Graphic Mundi can be found on Twitter (@GraphicMundi) and Instagram (@graphicmundi) and on the web at https://graphicmundi.org/.

Customer Service Tip: Free mini workshop — The 3R De-escalation Method

By: Myra Golden (submitted by Carmen Gass)

COVID-19 is making customers more hostile, and you need a strategy for quickly containing the situation and de-escalating the interaction. The 3R Method is battleground tested and easy to use – ideal for when you have to give bad news, enforce a mask requirement, or get an angry customer to calm down and listen to you. Learn about it here.

Fall 2020 University Libraries exhibitions

Fall 2020 — University Libraries Exhibitions

Earth Archives exhibition posterEXHIBITION: Earth Archives: Stories of Human Impact. To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Earth Archives explores the intersection of the environment, human activity, and the documentary record. Highlights of the virtual exhibition include representations of varied print, manuscript, and art works that invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource.

 

buttons from INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY: Highlights From the Ken Lawrence Collection

EXHIBITION: International Solidarity: Highlights from the Ken Lawrence Collection. A virtual look at the visual culture of political protest in the late 20th-century, to provoke thought about international solidarity in our own time, including human and civil rights, immigration, and independence movements.

Image: Physical Plant series, Greg Grieco photographs, 07488

EXHIBITION: Celebrating the ADA: The Legacy and Evolution of Disability Rights & Lived Experience at Penn State. To coincide with the 30th anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) on July 26, a new online exhibition, Celebrating the ADA explores the first 100 years of national disability rights legislation and the movement’s impact on the Penn State University community.

Please submit Libraries exhibit information — and all Library News submissions — to Public Relations and Marketing via its Staff Site request form and selecting the “Library News blog article” button.

Fall 2020 Libraries Exhibitions

Fall 2020 — University Libraries Exhibitions

Earth Archives exhibition posterEXHIBITION: Earth Archives: Stories of Human Impact. To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Earth Archives explores the intersection of the environment, human activity, and the documentary record. Highlights of the virtual exhibition include representations of varied print, manuscript, and art works that invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource.

 

buttons from INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY: Highlights From the Ken Lawrence Collection

EXHIBITION: International Solidarity: Highlights from the Ken Lawrence Collection. A virtual look at the visual culture of political protest in the late 20th-century, to provoke thought about international solidarity in our own time, including human and civil rights, immigration, and independence movements.

Image: Physical Plant series, Greg Grieco photographs, 07488

EXHIBITION: Celebrating the ADA: The Legacy and Evolution of Disability Rights & Lived Experience at Penn State. To coincide with the 30th anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) on July 26, a new online exhibition, Celebrating the ADA explores the first 100 years of national disability rights legislation and the movement’s impact on the Penn State University community.

Please submit Libraries exhibit information — and all Library News submissions — to Public Relations and Marketing via its Staff Site request form and selecting the “Library News blog article” button.

Tech Tip: Keeping your home computer safe

By: Ryan Johnson

home office photo

One of the questions I get asked the most is how to keep our home computers safe, especially if we are using them more during the current covid-19 pandemic.

Note: The information below is NOT for Library owned computers, just your personal computers

  • The first thing you can do is to make sure your windows computer is set to automatically update windows. This will also keep your Microsoft Office products (Word, Excel) up-to-date as well.

Here is an article on how to check to see if Windows Updates are turned on with simple step-by-step instructions:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/update-office-with-microsoft-update-f59d3f9d-bd5d-4d3b-a08e-1dd659cf5282

  • The next thing you should do is making sure you have a virus protection software running.

Penn State is also asking that users who have installed Symantec from downloads.its.psu.edu on any personal computers uninstall it as well by 8/22/20. On Windows 10 computers, the built-in Windows Defender is the recommended replacement for Symantec. Windows Defender. There are several free anti-virus options available for personal Macs as well. Please visit https://security.psu.edu/education-training/anti-virus/ for more information

The good thing is Microsoft Defender should be set to run automatically.  You can verify this but doing the following

Turn Windows Security real-time protection on or off

  • Select the Startbutton, then select Settings  Update & Security > Windows Security > Virus & threat protection.
  • In the current version of Windows 10: Under Virus & threat protection settings, select Manage settings, and then switch the Real-time protection setting to Onor Off.
  • In previous versions of Windows 10: Select Virus & threat protection settings, and then switch the Real-time protection setting to Onor Off.

Events: August 24

Summer 2020
Academic calendar information for all campuses is available online.

UPDATE: In light of the University’s March 11 announcement regarding measures to address the COVID-19 pandemic, nonessential events and meetings scheduled at University Libraries locations throughout the spring semester have been canceled, rescheduled or will be offered virtually. 

Earth Archives exhibition posterEXHIBITION: Earth Archives: Stories of Human Impact. To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Earth Archives explores the intersection of the environment, human activity, and the documentary record. Highlights of the virtual exhibition include representations of varied print, manuscript, and art works that invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource.

 

buttons from INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY: Highlights From the Ken Lawrence Collection

EXHIBITION: International Solidarity: Highlights from the Ken Lawrence Collection. A virtual look at the visual culture of political protest in the late 20th-century, to provoke thought about international solidarity in our own time, including human and civil rights, immigration, and independence movements.

Image: Physical Plant series, Greg Grieco photographs, 07488

EXHIBITION: Celebrating the ADA: The Legacy and Evolution of Disability Rights & Lived Experience at Penn State. To coincide with the 30th anniversary of the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) on July 26, a new online exhibition, Celebrating the ADA explores the first 100 years of national disability rights legislation and the movement’s impact on the Penn State University community.

Please submit event information — and all Library News submissions — to Public Relations and Marketing via its Staff Site request form and selecting the “Library News blog article” button.

University Libraries TOME funding supports faculty’s open access publication

By: Ally Laird

“Scriptures, Shrines, Scapegoats and World Politics: Religious Sources of Conflict and Cooperation in the Modern Era,” published by the University of Michigan Press, is the second book by Penn State faculty member Errol Henderson (and the fifth book from Penn State overall) to be supported by funds from the TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem) initiative. IMAGE: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PRESS

IMAGE: UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PRESS

Penn State faculty member Errol A. Henderson’s publication “Scriptures, Shrines, Scapegoats and World Politics: Religious Sources of Conflict and Cooperation in the Modern Era” has been published in an Open Access format by the University of Michigan Press, with funding from Penn State University Libraries through the TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem) initiative. Co-authored by Ze’ev Maoz, professor of political science at the University of California, Davis, the publication was sponsored by TOME funds from both universities.

According to the publisher’s website, the book “offers a comprehensive evaluation of the role of religion in international relations,” investigating the relationships between religion and various other topics, including cooperation, conflict and quality of life. It  is available both in print and as an e-book.

Henderson, an associate professor of political science, teaches international relations at the University Park campus. This is his second publication, and the fifth at Penn State overall, to be supported by the TOME initiative. Henderson’s first TOME publication, “The Revolution Will Not Be Theorized: Cultural Revolution in the Black Power Era,” was published in August 2019 by SUNY Press.

Henderson expressed appreciation for the TOME initiative, noting that making books available online for free “alleviates costs and helps make higher education more accessible.”

“The opportunity to work with the TOME program to make my new book openly available to all readers has been complemented by working with the excellent staff at University of Michigan Press and the Penn State University Libraries Research Informatics and Publishing department,” he said. “I am particularly grateful to the graduate and undergraduate students in Penn State’s Departments of Political Science and Sociology who provided invaluable research assistance — especially Tatiana Lukoianova, Jaime Harris and Tamara Tur — as well as my colleague Roger Finke of the Association of Religion Data Archives project, and my fellow members of the Correlates of War project. I am honored to have our work as a fully OA publication and to further extend the excellent academic reputation of international relations study at Penn State.”

A collaboration among the Association of American Universities (AAU), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of University Presses (AUP), the TOME initiative was designed to advance the wide dissemination of scholarship by humanities and humanistic social sciences faculty members through Open Access editions of peer-reviewed and professionally edited monographs.

Penn State was among the first of a growing number of universities that have pledged support for TOME. The Office of the Executive Vice President and Provost committed $45,000 to be divided among up to three subvention grants each fiscal year for five years (2018–23).

“We’re proud to provide support for Open Access versions of Penn State faculty-authored monographs through the TOME initiative,” said Ally Laird, open publishing program coordinator for the University Libraries and a contact for TOME at Penn State. “This initiative helps to increase the dissemination and accessibility of monographs by supporting the publication of Open Access versions. To date, we have provided support for five monographs by Penn State faculty, and we look forward to supporting many more between now and 2023.”

All five Penn State-authored, TOME-funded publications are available to read and download in the TOME collection in ScholarSphere, Penn State’s institutional repository. The Open Access edition of “Scriptures, Shrines, Scapegoats and World Politics” is also freely available on selected e-book platforms, including MUSE Open.

Anyone interested in having their monograph publication supported by Penn State’s TOME initiative should read the support criteria on the University Libraries’ TOME webpage. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis and should be submitted by the publisher.

For more information, visit the University Libraries’ website or contact Ally Laird or Cynthia Hudson Vitale.

The Great Rare Books Bake-Off

By: Mark Mattson and Christina Riehman-Murphy

#BakePennState graphic

The cakes and cookies are gone, the pie tins are cleaned, and the hashtags are counted. It was extremely close, but Penn State Libraries emerged the winner of the inaugural Great Rare Books Bake Off! 

 A collaborative project between the PSU Libraries and our international sister-library Monash University Library in Melbourne, Australia, the Great Rare Books Bake Off aimed to engage our collective communities with some of the tastier materials from the special collections of the two institutions. As a chance for cultural exchange, and a bit of fun during a time of limited travel and social interaction; and to raise awareness of the partnership between the two universities, the project encouraged individuals to try to bake one of the historic Australian or American recipes from our collections and post the results to social media. While PSU came out just ahead in submissions, both libraries consider the event a great success with over 160 individual submissions tallied between Monash and PSU. Given the fantastic engagement of the inaugural event, the partners are exploring the possibility of making the Bake Off an annual affair. 

To learn more about the event visit the event webpage and to see what people baked, visit Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook and search for #BakePennState and #BakeMonash 

A huge shout out goes out to Christina Riehman-Murphy, the overall organizer of the event, as well as Jennifer Meehan, Clara Drummond, Maggie Welch, Marissa Nicosia, Mark Mattson, Heather Froehlich, Lillian Hansberry, Amanda Peters, Heidi Moyer, Barbara Lessig, Jennifer Cifelli, Bev Molnar, and Christopher Blaska for all of their help putting this together. And a big thank you to all of you who participated in the contest and to our colleagues at Monash for their willingness to give this a go! 

 

 

New Maps and Geospatial Diversity Resources Guide

By: Tara Anthony

A new Maps & Geospatial: Diversity Resources has been published that highlights search strategies and selections of geospatial resources on diversity themes. Geospatial data, web maps, web applications, relevant library database resources, and digital map images are provided as starting points to users working on diversity projects with a geospatial component.

Maps & GIS Assistants gathered materials related to diversity themes and geospatial components during the Spring 2020 remote working period. A selection of these resources was incorporated into this guide. More information on their project can be seen on this sites page.

Events: July 13

Summer 2020
Academic calendar information for all campuses is available online.

UPDATE: In light of the University’s March 11 announcement regarding measures to address the COVID-19 pandemic, nonessential events and meetings scheduled at University Libraries locations throughout the spring semester have been canceled, rescheduled or will be offered virtually. 

Earth Archives exhibition posterEXHIBITION: Earth Archives: Stories of Human Impact. To coincide with the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, Earth Archives explores the intersection of the environment, human activity, and the documentary record. Highlights of the virtual exhibition include representations of varied print, manuscript, and art works that invites the viewer to consider a range of environmental-related topics and will serve as a growing, centralized resource.

 

buttons from INTERNATIONAL SOLIDARITY: Highlights From the Ken Lawrence Collection

EXHIBITION: International Solidarity: Highlights from the Ken Lawrence Collection. A virtual look at the visual culture of political protest in the late 20th-century, to provoke thought about international solidarity in our own time, including human and civil rights, immigration, and independence movements.

book cover of "The Hidden Life of Life: A Walk Through the Reaches of Time"Thursday, Aug. 20, Libraries Lunch Book Club. The University Libraries quarterly book club will launch with the selection “The Hidden Life of Life,” including a Q&A and discussion of the book with author Elizabeth Marshall Thomas. Noon-1:30 p.m. via Zoom. Advanced registration required.   

Please submit event information — and all Library News submissions — to Public Relations and Marketing via its Staff Site request form and selecting the “Library News blog article” button.

Pennsylvania and the 1918-1919 Pandemic

The University Libraries Microforms and Government Information staff is introducing a new project to increase awareness of the Libraries’ historical news resources. Each week we’ll offer a selection of newspaper articles documenting life in Pennsylvania during the historic pandemic.  While health and medicine will be regular features, we will also highlight other daily concerns, from shopping to sports, from movies to military affairs.

As the world grapples with Covid-19, there is renewed interest in the “Spanish influenza” of 1918-1919.  Overshadowed in history books by the events of World War I, the 1918-1919 pandemic caused an estimated 50 million deaths, worldwide.  Over 25 percent of the American population was afflicted with the flu which shortened the average life expectancy in the United States by twelve years.

Some articles will be from the PA newspaper archive which is freely available to all, others will be from Penn State subscription databases (available to Penn State users and visitors to PSU campuses). Look for the weekly updates at: https://guides.libraries.psu.edu/c.php?g=350496&p=7663157 and on the libraries’ Facebook and Twitter pages.

Getting to Know You: Linda Struble

By: Gale Biddle

Linda Struble and Ed on motocycle photo

When you’re from a very small town, you get used to people asking, “Where is that?” My hometown, Spruce Creek, Pennsylvania, is one of those small towns: a beautiful farming area between State College and Warriors Mark. If you blink too long while driving through it, though, you’ll miss it. I was incredibly surprised when I was talking with Linda Struble to find out that she, too, was from this tiny town. It was nice to chat with someone about the places we used to go (not that there are very many places!) This coincidence is just the first of many things that I found surprising and interesting about Linda.

Linda started as a part-time evening supervisor in the Engineering Library at University Park in 1995 before receiving a full-time position in 1998. In September 2009, she became the Information Resources and Services Supervisor-Manager. While working in the library, she took on the incredible task of also being a Schreyers Honors scholar and obtaining her Bachelor of Arts in Fine/Studio Arts in 2010. To work at the same place for 25 years like she has at Penn State, you have to have something that keeps you coming in every day. For Linda, it’s that she “loves getting to meet people from all over the world and learning about different cultures.” Just one of the many perks of working at Penn State!

Linda’s first job was working at a frozen pizza factory in Tyrone where (warning: if you really enjoy frozen pizza, you might want to skip this next part) she picked mold off the crusts before it went further down the line. Needless to say, it was a long time before she was able to eat a frozen pizza. Plus, she didn’t enjoy being cold all of the time, and to this day, she still has a scar from the shrink-wrapping machine. Growing up, Linda’s family owned a restaurant. This experience was where her love of baking started. She’s been a pastry baker for places from New York to Florida. She prefers Scandinavian baking since her father’s family is from Sweden.

And speaking of her family, an interesting note is that Linda is the only one in her family who is under six feet tall. In her spare time, Linda enjoys riding motorcycles with her husband, although she says she makes a better passenger than an operator. She also helps him with his roofing business by doing paperwork and sometimes climbing on the roof with him. They have
one daughter, who is an equestrienne, and Siamese cats. Linda loves Halloween (she really outdoes herself with the decorations,) reading, the beach, photography, and traveling. She has a brother who lives in Switzerland, and she’s enjoyed visiting him and traveling around Europe. She also enjoys being a dancer tracker at the Penn State Powwows.

I thoroughly enjoyed talking with Linda, and I hope you’ve learned some fascinating and interesting things about her. Now, we all have to try to forget about the frozen pizza thing…

Ten Questions with Linda Struble

1. Cereal—crunchy or soggy? — Crunchy
2. Favorite cartoon? — Bugs Bunny
3. What artist/band do you always recommend when someone asks? — AC/DC
4. There are two types of people in this world. What are they? — Righty tighty, lefty loosey (right-handers, left-handers and beyond)
5. You have $100 to spend. All your friends are busy. You have the whole day to yourself. What do you do? — Get a crème brulee and a pedicure after hitting the flea market
6. What is the best compliment you ever received? —Tom Conkling, the former Head of Engineering, told Linda that “you’re not like other artists,” meaning that he thought she had a good balance of creative and critical thinking skills
7. What one thing do you really but can’t afford? — A 1963 Corvette with a split rear window
8. Would you rather visit the past or the future? — Future
9. Favorite color? — Purple
10. First thing you would do if you won the lottery? — Visit Sweden

Tech Tip: Adding a link to Teams in your email signature

By: Ryan Johnson

Note: These instructions are written for the Microsoft Outlook website (http://outlook.office.com).  You can add a link to Teams in any email client, but the steps may be slightly different.

  1. Log into your Microsoft Outlook Mail
  2. Click on the Settings icon at the top right (it looks like a gear)
  3. Click on View All Outlook Settings at the bottom of the window outlook settings screenshot
  4. Click on Compose and Reply
  5. In the window pane to the right, within the Email Signature, type the following text at the top: Using Microsoft Teams? Click here to chat with me on Microsoft Teams
  6. Highlight Microsoft Teams? and click on the Insert Hyperlink icon
  7. For the Web Address use https://teams.microsoft.com and then click Ok
  8. Highlight here and click on the Insert Hyperlink icon again
  9. For the “Web Address” use https://teams.microsoft.com/l/chat/0/0?users=username@psu.edu and then click “Ok” (NOTE: change the ‘username@psu.edu’ to be your PSU email address)
  10. Click Save at the top right of the window.
  11. If done correctly, you will now have a line in your email signature that looks like the example below.

Outlook thumbnail screenshot

Tech Tip: Turn on live subtitles and captions in PowerPoint from Office 365

By: Ryan Johnson

Do you want to make your presentations better understood by everyone in the room? Some of your students may be a native speaker in another language or have difficulty hearing when you have a soft-spoken guest. Live Captions and Subtitles in PowerPoint can provide captions for your presentation in the same language you are speaking or translate it into another language in real-time!

How to turn on Live Captions & Subtitles:

  1. Open PowerPoint Presentation in PowerPoint on Office 365
  2. Navigate to the Slide Show menu.
  3. Select the Always Use Subtitles option.

Always use Subtitles screenshot

4. Choose where you would like the Subtitles to appear.

4.	Choose where you would like the Subtitles to appear.

5. After selecting the location of the Subtitles, navigate to the Spoken Language options.
6. Select the Spoken Language from the menu of options.
7. Next, choose the Subtitle Language for the translation.

5.	 After selecting the location of the Subtitles, navigate to the Spoken Language options. 6.	Select the Spoken Language from the menu of options. 7.	Next, choose the Subtitle Language for the translation.

8. After selecting the Subtitle Language, test your presentation to make sure your microphone  is working. Start the slideshow and begin speaking.

Virtual Peer-to-Peer Consultations

By: Claire Salvati

The Search Bar offers a suite of peer-to-peer undergraduate student services. Peer Research Consultants, Writing Tutors, and Tech Tutors support research, writing, and technology needs
through in-person (Fall & Spring) and virtual consultations. The services are a collaboration between the University Libraries, Penn State Learning, and Penn State Teaching and Learning with Technology.

We will be launching virtual drop-in consultations and tutoring sessions during the Summer Session II. For more information about how to connect with our services, please visit the Search Bar Services page or https://libraries.psu.edu/services/search-bar-services.

Customer Service Tip: How to be a hero to your customers

By: Jeff Toister (submitted by Carmen Gass)

Heroism is a misunderstood concept.

Countless customer service employees have told me they can’t be a hero. According to them, their job doesn’t allow it.

“I’m a cashier/receptionist/call center rep/etc.,” they say. “There’s hardly ever an opportunity to be a hero to customers. Most of my interactions are routine.”

Customer experience expert and keynote speaker, Adam Toporek, believes all customer service employees can be heroes. He’s the author of Be Your Customer’s Hero, a book that shows anyone how they can be a hero to their customers. Read more here.