Tag Archives: Pennsylvania Center for the Book

Hopkins Award’s 25th anniversary event Oct. 12

The 25th annual Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award will be presented this Thursday evening (Oct. 12) at 7 p.m. to winner Jorge Argueta, author of Somos como las nubes/We Are Like the Clouds, and honor recipient Nikki Grimes, author of Garvey’s Choice.

cover image title "Somos como las nubes/We Are Like the Clouds" shows silohouettes of people with packages walking in a row plus two children sleeping under the moon, illustrator Alfonso Ruano

“Somos como las nubes/We Are Like the Clouds,” Jorge Argueta’s 2017 Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award-winning book

photo of smlining man with mustache and long braid, wearing hat and striped shirt

Jorge Argueta

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Argueta will accept the award and the $1,000 prize, courtesy of Lee Bennett Hopkins, in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, on the University Park campus. Grimes also will accept her honor during the event. Both are invited to speak during the event.

book cover of "Garvey's Choice" by Nikki Grimes, Coretta Scott King author, showing Laura Ingalls Wilder Award seal on top of illustration of dark house with lights shining into darkness, connected to telephone pole and line strung with musical notes

“Garvey’s Choice” by Nikki Grimes, Hopkins Poetry Award honor recipient

photo of woman standing, wearing black shirt and pants with bright red necklace and extra-long red scarf or vest decorated with circle patterns

Nikki Grimes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While attendees are strongly encouraged to attend the award ceremony in person to be on hand for some special surprises prepared for the silver anniversary event, those who are unable to be present are invited to tune in for the livestream beginning at 7 p.m. via Mediasite Live.

Read more about both books and authors from the award announcement posted this spring on Penn State News.

2017 edition of “A Baker’s Dozen: Best Books for Family Literacy” announced

Committed to providing an annual list of the best books to support family literacy, the Pennsylvania Center for the Book has announced its 13 books for the 2017 edition. “A Baker’s Dozen: The Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy for 2017” was compiled by a panel of children’s literature experts from the many children’s books published last year.

The titles for the 2017 list include:

  • “123 Dream” by Kim Kranz (published by Random);
  • “ABCs on Wheels” by Ramon Olivera (Little Simon);
  • “D Is for Dress-Up: The ABC’s of What We Wear” by Maria Carluccio (Chronicle);
  • “Ella and Penguin Stick Together” by Megan Maynor, illustrated by Rosalinde Bonnet (HarperCollins);
  • “Faraway Fox” by Jolene Thompson, illustrated by Justin K. Thompson (Houghton);
  • “Lion Lessons” by Jon Agee (Dial);
  • “Owl Sees Owl” by Laura Godwin, illustrated by Rob Dunlavey (Random/Schwartz & Wade);
  • “The Saddest Toilet in the World” by Sam Apple, illustrated by Sam Ricks (Simon/Aladdin);
  • “They All Saw A Cat” by Brendan Wenzel (Chronicle);
  • “Walter’s Wonderful Web” by Tim Hopgood (Farrar);
  • “We Found A Hat” by Jon Klassen (Candlewick);
  • “A Well-Mannered Young Wolf” by Jean Leroy, illustrated by Matthieu Maudet (Eerdmans); and
  • “When Spring Comes” by Kevin Henkes, illustrated by Laura Dronzek (Greenwillow)

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The Pennsylvania Center for the Book, assessing hundreds of new children’s books each year, prepares book lists, activities and curriculum materials. Working with its youngest audience, preschool children, the Baker’s Dozen list complements the center’s family literacy activities to help parents and caregivers to create and nurture lifelong readers. Tips for using the books with children and families, previous years’ selections, annotations, selection criterial and more are available through the “A Baker’s Dozen” website.

The Pennsylvania Center for the Book, sponsored by Penn State’s University Libraries and Barbara I. Dewey, dean of University Libraries and Scholarly Communications, is one of 51 similar organizations nationwide established by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. Its mission is to study, honor, celebrate and promote books, reading, libraries and literacy to the citizens and residents of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

For more information, visit http://www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu or contact Caroline Wermuth, outreach coordinator, Pennsylvania Center for the Book, at cvw1@psu.edu or 814-863-5472.

Pa. Center for the Book honors 2017 Letters About Literature contest winners

three girls wearing colorful outfits standing in front of a shrub with pink flowers

The Pennsylvania winners of the 2017 Letters About Literature Contest are, from left to right, Level II (grades seven to eight) winner Madison Kelleher, of Montoursville; Level III (grades nine to 12) winner Hailey Cross, of Scottdale; and Level I (grades four to six) winner Lydia Floreck, of Gettysburg.

The Pennsylvania Center for the Book recently recognized the Pennsylvania winners of the 2017 Letters About Literature Contest. A nationwide event sponsored by the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress, the contest invites students in three grade levels to write letters to authors — living or dead — about how an author’s words affected them or changed their worldview.

The Level I (grades four to six) winner, Lydia Floreck, of Gettysburg, was honored for her letter to Susan Cain about “Quiet Power.” The Level II (grades seven to eight) winner, Madison A. Kelleher, of Montoursville, wrote her letter to Robert Munsch about “Love You Forever.” And the Level III (grades nine to 12) winner, Hailey Cross, of Scottdale, was honored for her letter to James Hurst about “Scarlet Ibis.”

Winners receive $200 and were honored at a celebratory luncheon with their families on Saturday, May 20, at the Nittany Lion Inn on Penn State’s University Park campus.

The full Penn State News article may be read online.

For more information about the Letters About Literature Contest in Pennsylvania, contact editor Nicole Miyashiro at nmm16@psu.edu, or visit the Pennsylvania Center for the Book website at www.pabook.libraries.psu.edu.

Pennsylvania Center for the Book selects book for 2017 Route One Reads initiative

For the third consecutive year, the Pennsylvania Center for the Book will participate in the Route One Reads initiative, a program under the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. In 2017, the theme of the initiative will be memoirs and biographies, and the selected book to represent Pennsylvania is “The Life and Times of Mary Vaux Walcott” by Marjorie G. Jones (Schiffer).

Jones chronicles the life of Mary Vaux Walcott using letters, journal entries, newspaper reports, illustrations and photographs. She tells the story of Walcott, a Philadelphia Quaker (1860-1940), whose life as an avid explorer, glaciologist, early photographer, Indian commissioner and renowned illustrator of North American wildflowers illuminates the worldview of intrepid women of her era.

“Walcott was quite an explorer and trailblazer for her time,” Caroline Wermuth, Pennsylvania Center for the Book outreach coordinator, said. “It’s a great read for women’s history.”

The diverse reading list created by Route One Reads highlights each individual State Center for the Book while celebrating the East Coast as a whole. By participating in Route One Reads, readers can travel across 15 states and the District of Columbia without taking a single footstep, or load selected books into the car for a literary road trip. The full list of featured books for the 2017 Route One Reads initiative is available along with a map of participating states at: Route1Reads.org . Visit pabook.libraries.psu.edu/route1reads for Pennsylvania’s book.

Route One Reads is a partnership between the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress and its affiliates in: Connecticut; Delaware; Florida; Georgia; Maine; Maryland; Massachusetts; New Hampshire; New Jersey; New York; North Carolina; Pennsylvania; Rhode Island; South Carolina; Virginia; and, Washington, D.C. Connecting the 2,369 miles of U.S. Route 1 from Ft. Kent, Maine, to Key West, Florida, the Route One Reads initiative is a partnership between 16 affiliate Centers for the Book to promote books that illuminate important aspects of their states or commonwealths for readers traveling the major and meandering highway. The initiative was launched at the 2015 National Book Festival in Washington, D.C. For more information, visit Route1Reads.org or follow #Route1Reads on Twitter.

The Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress (LINK: Read.gov), encourages Pennsylvania’s citizens and residents to study, honor, celebrate and promote books, reading, libraries and literacy. In addition to the Route One Reads initiative, it also administers the Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award, the Lynd Ward Graphic Novel Prize , the Public Poetry Project, Letters about LiteratureA Baker’s Dozen: The Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy; and the interactive Literary & Cultural Heritage Map of Pennsylvania.

For more information about Route One Reads for other initiatives of the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, contact Nicole Miyashiro at nmm16@psu.edu.

‘An Evening of Pennsylvania Poets’ public poetry reading April 20

Poems by James Brasfield, Meg Day, Fred Shaw and Laura Spagnoli were selected for the 2017 Public Poetry Project poster series, and each of the poets will read their works as part of “An Evening of Pennsylvania Poets: Readings in Celebration of the Public Poetry Project” at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, April 20. The 17th annual event will be held in Foster Auditorium, 102 Paterno Library, s and will be available on Mediasite Live.

Started in 1999 by the late Kim Fisher, the first Paterno Family Librarian for Literature, the Public Poetry Project seeks to make poetry more available in the daily lives of Pennsylvanians by placing poems in public places. Posters of the winning poems are produced, and since 2000, more than 70 poets with a connection to Pennsylvania, either by birth or long period of residency, have had their work displayed as part of this series.

The hourlong poetry reading event will be followed by a 30-minute poster- and book-signing session. This year’s posters were designed by University Libraries’ Visual Communications Specialist Nathan Valchar and will be available at no charge at this event. The posters also will be distributed at the National Book Festival in September, an annual event organized and sponsored by the Library of Congress.

The Public Poetry Project is under the direction of Ellysa Cahoy, assistant director, and Caroline Wermuth, outreach coordinator, for the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, and is supported by the Paterno Family Librarian for Literature, William S. Brockman; the University Libraries; the Department of English in the College of the Liberal Arts; and the Pennsylvania Center for the Book, an affiliate of the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

An American Sign Language interpreter will be provided for the April 20 Public Poetry Project event. For more information, including physical access and other special accommodations, contact Caroline Wermuth at cvw1@psu.edu or 814-863-5472. For more information about the Public Poetry Project, visit its website.