Category Archives: Academic Planning

TAs needed for NUTR 100 Spring 2020

You can earn 400-level supporting course credit for serving as a TA (Teaching Assistant) for any nutrition course. Being a TA can also be a valuable learning experience for undergraduates and one that you can definitely include on your resume. By assisting with the grading of assignments, students will also get a better understanding of their chosen field and the nutritional value of foods. Additionally, helping run a course may broaden your perspective for those thinking about teaching as a career option, whether it be in the classroom or within a clinical setting.

NUTR 100Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle (3 cr. GHW) is a newly-revised introductory nutrition course for students who are not majoring in HHD. Both sections needing TAs meet in Thomas 101. Course meeting times this spring are:

  • Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:05-4:20 a.m. (Sect 002)
  • Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3:05-4:20 p.m. (Sect 003)

Students who commit to being a NUTR 100 TA will be required to:

  • Attend course lectures and assist with in-class activities for large groups of students (requires 3 hours per week)
  • Grade 4-5 outside-of-class assignments (requires an additional 5-6 hours per assignment)

Student TAs must have completed NUTR 251 with a grade of B+ or better to TA for NUTR 100. If interested, please contact Dr. Adams (cca5153@psu.edu) with a statement as to why you would like to be a TA.

Additional Appointments & Walk-In Periods

I was out of town Nov. 18-27 due to a family health emergency. To make up for missed appointments, I have added extra appointment slots and walk-in periods Dec. 2-18. Please come see me if you need anything! starfish.psu.edu
Dave
David A. Cassiday
Nutritional Science Advisor
Penn State University

Interesting *NEW* Spring 2020 courses (that will count as supporting courses)

ANTH 497 – Spillover: Anthropology of Emerging Infectious Disease


BIOL 497 – Human Pathophysiology (3 credits)

This course focuses on manifestations of human diseases and what changes occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels to cause disease states. Topics covered include mechanisms of disease, inflammation repair, features of selected diseases for each body system, diagnostic testing, and pharmacotherapy. The primary goal of the course is to reinforce student knowledge of normal physiology by studying pathophysiology. The course will feature traditional didactics, case studies, group problem-based activities, and analysis of primary literature in pathophysiology.

BIOL 497 – Evolutionary Medicine (3 credits)
Evolutionary medicine is the application of evolutionary theory to the study of human health and disease. Health is affected by a number of factors, including the aging process, the microbiome, cancer, infectious disease, and antibiotic resistance. Most medical research attempts to identify how these factors can be controlled. Evolutionary medicine explores why they exist in the first place. the goal of this course is to provide students with a new perspective for understanding human health and disease. Students will distinguish the evolutionary causes of disease and the possible consequences (positive and negative) of medical and public health interventions. Students will also critique arguments posed both in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and the popular press.

HDFS 297: Art and Science of Compassion
Instructors: Robert W. Roeser, Blake Colaianne
Spring 2020, 2 Credits
1/13-3/27, W 2:30-5:30.

Human service professionals (e.g., educators, nurses, social workers, counselors, youth service workers) care for large numbers of people, and the demands of caring for so many over time can become challenging – sometimes leading to empathy fatigue and burnout. In this course, we will explore both the art of caring for others, as well as the science of care and compassion. Drawing on contemporary theories in both science and contemplative traditions like Buddhism, we will conceptualize care and compassion in terms of three basic modalities, including (1) extending care and compassion to others, (2) receiving care and compassion from others; and (3) extending care and compassion to oneself (e.g., self-care). A core component of the course will be having students learn and practice compassion exercises related to these three basic modalities and the development of the related skills of extending and receiving care. Through the development of theoretical and scientific knowledge, and through the experiential cultivation of the skills of care and compassion, students will be better able to engage and connect more effectively with others in their lives. In addition, they will be learning a key set of skills essential for thriving in the human services professions.

MATH 297 – Scientific Computation for Biology (3 credits)

SC 201 – Medical Professions (1 credit)
For students who are about a year away from applying to medical, PA, dental, PT, OT, or nursing school.

Spring 2020 Special Course: NURS 497 Health Disparities

This would be a terrific 400-level supporting course for NUTR majors.

Nursing Special Topics Course Offering – Spring 2020

NURS 497 (#20329)– Health Disparities (3 credits)

This course will explore contemporary health disparities in the United States. Students will be introduced to health outcomes that vary by sexual orientation, gender, race, and other social determinants of health. We will learn about frameworks that have been used to explain disparate health outcomes and healthcare and discuss how scientific data can serve as an impetus to improve well-being for everyone.

This class will meet on Mondays from 9:00 AM – 11:30 AM in 271 Willard Building and will be taught by Britney Wardecker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing.

There are no prerequisites, and the course is open to all University Park students.

NUTR 445 in Spring 2020

If you plan to take NUTR 445 this spring and will have completed NUTR 251, BIOL 141, and BMB 211 with C’s or better by the end of this semester, please add your name, ID, and e-mail to this spreadsheet: https://pennstateoffice365-my.sharepoint.com/:x:/g/personal/dac293_psu_edu/EcAh-5edhi5MtEcwUHspUcABRhT5SgzN4F6rTkaVDBAMqw?e=nXzkdl. The College of HHD is having Lionpath block registration for students who do not have the prerequisites for its courses, but it unfortunately is looking for the new prerequisites of BIOL 161-164 and NUTR 211R. We will add you manually to NUTR 445 during your registration period.

Preparation & Info for Upcoming Advising Appointments

Many of you have appointments with me in the next 2-3 weeks to discuss your spring schedules. To prepare for these appointments, please run an “Academic Requirements Report” and sketch out a spring schedule that advances you toward your degree. Most of you will be following the Suggested Academic Plans found here: https://bulletins.psu.edu/archive/2018-19/undergraduate/colleges/health-human-development/nutritional-sciences-bs/#suggestedacademicplantext.

  • A few notes about Audits and What-If Reports in Lionpath:
    Some audits still search for HM 228, which was discontinued after Summer 2017 – HM 228 material was folded into HM 329 & 330
  • Starting with the 2018-19 academic year:
    • NUTR 456 became NUTR 361
    • NUTR 370 (1 cr) was discontinued and was folded into NUTR 391 (which became 2 cr instead of 1 cr)
    • NUTR 371 (1 cr) became NUTR 393 (1 cr)

Since many current students took the old courses, the degree audit may still look for them. As long as you have taken one version of the course, old or new, you have fulfilled your degree requirements. Your Academic Requirements reports and What-If reports evaluate your degree progress according to the year you started at Penn State. It will also list the name of your chosen option (e.g., Applied Science, Basic Sciences, Dietetics) as it was at the time.

As a heads up, your final transcripts will list the new option names (Behavioral Nutrition & Public Health, Nutrition & Dietetics, and Nutritional Physiology & Biochemistry). To repeat, however, your degree requirements have not changed.

I know it’s a little confusing, but it works out. If you have questions, we can discuss them during appointments.

David A. Cassiday
Nutritional Sciences Advisor
Penn State University

“Express Advising”

In order to meet the demand for advising prior to registration, I have set up appointment blocks labeled “Express Advising” on Starfish. These appointments will last only 15 minutes and are devoted to scheduling questions only for the Spring 2020 semester. These appointments are open only to students majoring or minoring in Nutritional Sciences. The currently available blocks of 15-minute appointments are:

Wednesday, Oct. 9, 9:00-11:00 am
Thursday, Oct. 10, 1:30-3:00 pm
Friday, Oct. 11, 10:00 am-11:30 am
Thursday, Oct.17, 9:00-11:00 am
Friday, Oct.18, 10:00-11:30 am
Friday, Oct.18, 2:00-3:30pm

To facilitate these express appointments, please run an “Academic Requirements” report and outline a schedule for Spring 2020 that advances you toward your degree. I can then review your proposed schedule and answer any questions you have. More Express Advising blocks may be added if needed.

For long-range plans or more detailed, serious matters, please schedule a regular 30-minute appointment. Thank you!

Dave Cassiday
Nutritional Sciences Advisor

HHD Education Abroad Open House – Wed, Sept. 25, 3-5pm

Explore study abroad programs led by HHD faculty all over the world.
Commons Area (first floor), HHD Building

3:00 pm – Tips for Studying Abroad: Panel Discussion with HHD students who have previously studied abroad.

Nutritional Sciences Students Interested in Medical, Dental, or Physician Assistant Careers

 

If you are interested in pursuing a career in medicine, dentistry, or Physician Assistant, the Health Professions Advisors in the Eberly College will be hosting these group advising sessions:

  • Med Prep (for students interested in medicine, dentistry), Thursday September 5, 6-7 pm @ 101 Thomas
  • PA Prep, Tuesday Sept. 10, 6-7pm @ 112 Buckhout
  • PA Prep, Wednesday Nov. 6, 6-7 Pm @ 201 Thomas
  • Med Prep, Monday Nov. 11, 6-7 pm @ 262 Willard

The pre-health advisors typically require students to attend one of these sessions first before making a 1-on-1 appointment. As a Nutritional Science major, you would see me to stay on track with your degree and a health professions advisor to discuss plans for medical, dental, or PA school.

Fall TAs Needed for NUTR 100, 358 and 361

You can earn 400-level supporting course credit for serving as a TA (Teaching Assistant) for any nutrition course. Being a TA can also be a valuable learning experience for undergraduates. In assisting with the grading of assignments, students will get a better understanding of their chosen field and the nutritional value of foods. Additionally, helping run a course may broaden your perspective for those thinking about teaching as a career option, whether it be in the classroom or within a clinical setting.

TAs are still needed for the following courses this fall semester:

NUTR 100Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle (3 cr. GHW): Course meeting times/location:

  • Tuesdays and Thursdays from 9:05-10:20 a.m. in Sparks 10
  • Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10:35-11:50 a.m. in BBH 022

Students who commit to being a NUTR 100 TA will be required to:

  • Attend course lectures and assist with in-class activities for large groups of students (requires 3 hours per week)
  • Grade 3-4 outside-of-class assignments (requires an additional 5-6 hours per assignment)

Student TAs must have completed NUTR 251 with a grade of B or better to TA for NUTR 100. If interested, please contact Dr. Adams (cca5153@psu.edu) with a statement as to why you would like to be a TA.

NUTR 358 (Assessment of Nutritional Status) and
NUTR 361 (Community and Public Health Nutrition, formerly NUTR 456):
Course meeting times/locations:

  • NUTR 358: M/W 8:00-9:15 a.m. – Nursing Sciences Building
  • NUTR 361: T/Th 3:05-4:20 p.m. – HHD 005

Junior or Senior Nutrition Majors who successfully completed the course they want to TA with grade of B or better are encouraged to apply for these upper-level TA opportunities (see below). This commitment will require approximately 3-5 hours per week of time assisting the instructor by:

  1. Grading assignments
  2. Answering questions and helping students to improve their study skills and nutrition concepts
  3. Helping to proctor quizzes (given during lecture periods)
  4. Coming to lecture (encouraged, but not always required)

If interested in either NUTR 358 or 360, please contact Dr. Fleming (jas58@psu.edu) and please include the following information:

  1. A list of nutrition courses you have taken with grades received
  2. Whether you are available to attend the lectures
  3. A brief statement as to why you want this experience

Thank you for considering these opportunities to help support the Nutritional Sciences Department!