Category Archives: Academic Planning

Advising Walk-In Times for Friday, Jan. 17: 10-11:30 and 1:30-3:30

This is a slight change from what was previously posted. Due to a prior commitment, I have to shift walk-in times this afternoon to 1:30-3:30.

HealthWorks: Peer Health Education Outreach Program

HealthWorks, a peer health education outreach program in Health Promotion and Wellness, is currently recruiting student volunteers to become Peer Health Educators for the 2020 – 2021 academic year. The deadline for applications is February 28, 2020. Students from all majors are encouraged to apply.

Volunteering in HealthWorks helps prepare students for careers in public health, allied health fields, nursing, nutrition, medicine, advertising, and public relations.

HealthWorks peer educators work to address college health issues at Penn State, including stress, nutrition, physical activity, sleep, and sexual health.

Students have two different opportunities for promoting health among their peers: 1) One-on-one wellness services for students 2) Outreach and promotion through workshops and initiatives.  One-on-one peer educators will meet individually with students to provide free wellness services.  The topics include stress and time management, physical activity, nutrition, sleep, sexual health, and healthy relationships.

The outreach and promotion peer educators plan and implement various health promotion initiatives and efforts to encourage healthy lifestyle choices among Penn State students. Examples of HealthWorks initiatives include writing for the Healthy Penn State blog and Instagram, hosting Eating Disorder Awareness and Love Your Body week, creating healthy cooking videos, conducting minority health outreach tables, facilitating workshops on different health topics and providing HIV test counseling.

Students who apply and are accepted will receive training through a 3-credit course offered through the Department of Biobehavioral Health in Fall 2020. The course is designed to train peer health educators on health issues and health promotion theories and strategies for college students.

Students can learn more about HealthWorks and apply online at https://studentaffairs.psu.edu/health-wellness/healthy-living/volunteer-experiences-health-and-wellness/healthworks.

If students have questions, they can contact me via e-mail at promotinghealth@psu.edu or by phone at (814) 863-0461.

Glitches with Applying for Graduation

Apparently there is a system-wide Lionpath problem with updating semester standing, so the “apply to graduation” link is not yet appearing for all eligible seniors. If it is not resolved by the end of this week (Jan. 17), contact the Registrar at registrar@psu.edu.

HHD News for Students

Global Health Minor Information Sessions
-Monday, Jan. 13, 6 pm, 110 Henderson Bldg.
-Monday, Jan. 27, 6 pm, 110 Henderson Bldg.

Women’s Leadership Initiative
-Wednesday, Jan. 22, 6 pm, 110 Henderson Bldg.
-Thursday, Jan. 23, 6 pm, 110 Henderson Bldg.

Get Funding for your Summer Research
Erickson Discovery Grants
-Deadline: January 20

Study Abroad Week
January 20-24
https://global.psu.edu/studyabroadweek

Advising Walk-In Hours: Jan 13-17

Welcome back, Nutrition majors! I hope everyone had a relaxing break and is returning to State College refreshed. During Drop/Add week, I will have walk-in hours only, at these times:

M, W, Th – 9-11 am and 2-4 pm
T 9:30-11:00 am and 2-4 pm
F 10:00-11:30 am and 2-4 pm

Drop/Add week walk-ins are exclusively for scheduling questions for the Spring 2020 semester. All other issues, such as long-range academic plans, health professions, scholarships, internships, etc. will have to wait for scheduled appointments starting the following week. See Starfish for availability. See you soon!
David A. Cassiday
Nutritional Sciences Advisor

NUTRITION TAs Still Needed for Spring Semester

You can earn 400-level supporting course credit for serving as a TA (Teaching Assistant) for any nutrition course. Being a TA can also be a valuable learning experience for undergraduates and one that you can definitely include on your resume. By assisting with the grading of assignments, students will also get a better understanding of their chosen field and the nutritional value of foods. Additionally, helping run a course may broaden your perspective for those thinking about teaching as a career option, whether it be in the classroom or within a clinical setting.

NUTR 100Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle (3 cr. GHW) is a newly-revised introductory nutrition course for students who are not majoring in HHD. Both sections needing TAs meet in Thomas 101. Course meeting times this spring are:

  • Sect 002 meets Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:05-4:20 a.m.
  • Sect 003 Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3:35-4:25 p.m.

NUTR 251-Introductory Principles of Nutrition (3 cr.)
For students majoring in Nutrition, Kinesiology or other health sciences.

  • Section 002 meets Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays
    from 2:30 – 3:2o in 112 Chambers.

Students who commit to being a NUTR TA will be asked to:

  • Attend course lectures and assist with in-class activities for large groups of students (requires 3 hours per week)
  • Grade 4-5 out-of-class assignments spread over the semester with at least 2 weeks between them (requires an additional 5-6 hours per assignment)

Student TAs must have completed NUTR 251 with a grade of B+ or better to TA for NUTR 100. If interested, please contact Dr. Adams (cca5153@psu.edu).

TAs needed for NUTR 100 Spring 2020

You can earn 400-level supporting course credit for serving as a TA (Teaching Assistant) for any nutrition course. Being a TA can also be a valuable learning experience for undergraduates and one that you can definitely include on your resume. By assisting with the grading of assignments, students will also get a better understanding of their chosen field and the nutritional value of foods. Additionally, helping run a course may broaden your perspective for those thinking about teaching as a career option, whether it be in the classroom or within a clinical setting.

NUTR 100Nutrition Applications for a Healthy Lifestyle (3 cr. GHW) is a newly-revised introductory nutrition course for students who are not majoring in HHD. Both sections needing TAs meet in Thomas 101. Course meeting times this spring are:

  • Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3:05-4:20 a.m. (Sect 002)
  • Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 3:35-4:25 p.m. (Sect 003)

Students who commit to being a NUTR 100 TA will be required to:

  • Attend course lectures and assist with in-class activities for large groups of students (requires 3 hours per week)
  • Grade 4-5 outside-of-class assignments (requires an additional 5-6 hours per assignment)

Student TAs must have completed NUTR 251 with a grade of B+ or better to TA for NUTR 100. If interested, please contact Dr. Adams (cca5153@psu.edu) with a statement as to why you would like to be a TA.

Additional Appointments & Walk-In Periods

I was out of town Nov. 18-27 due to a family health emergency. To make up for missed appointments, I have added extra appointment slots and walk-in periods Dec. 2-18. Please come see me if you need anything! starfish.psu.edu
Dave
David A. Cassiday
Nutritional Science Advisor
Penn State University

Interesting *NEW* Spring 2020 courses (that will count as supporting courses)

ANTH 497 – Spillover: Anthropology of Emerging Infectious Disease


BIOL 497 – Human Pathophysiology (3 credits)

This course focuses on manifestations of human diseases and what changes occur at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and system levels to cause disease states. Topics covered include mechanisms of disease, inflammation repair, features of selected diseases for each body system, diagnostic testing, and pharmacotherapy. The primary goal of the course is to reinforce student knowledge of normal physiology by studying pathophysiology. The course will feature traditional didactics, case studies, group problem-based activities, and analysis of primary literature in pathophysiology.

BIOL 497 – Evolutionary Medicine (3 credits)
Evolutionary medicine is the application of evolutionary theory to the study of human health and disease. Health is affected by a number of factors, including the aging process, the microbiome, cancer, infectious disease, and antibiotic resistance. Most medical research attempts to identify how these factors can be controlled. Evolutionary medicine explores why they exist in the first place. the goal of this course is to provide students with a new perspective for understanding human health and disease. Students will distinguish the evolutionary causes of disease and the possible consequences (positive and negative) of medical and public health interventions. Students will also critique arguments posed both in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and the popular press.

HDFS 297: Art and Science of Compassion
Instructors: Robert W. Roeser, Blake Colaianne
Spring 2020, 2 Credits
1/13-3/27, W 2:30-5:30.

Human service professionals (e.g., educators, nurses, social workers, counselors, youth service workers) care for large numbers of people, and the demands of caring for so many over time can become challenging – sometimes leading to empathy fatigue and burnout. In this course, we will explore both the art of caring for others, as well as the science of care and compassion. Drawing on contemporary theories in both science and contemplative traditions like Buddhism, we will conceptualize care and compassion in terms of three basic modalities, including (1) extending care and compassion to others, (2) receiving care and compassion from others; and (3) extending care and compassion to oneself (e.g., self-care). A core component of the course will be having students learn and practice compassion exercises related to these three basic modalities and the development of the related skills of extending and receiving care. Through the development of theoretical and scientific knowledge, and through the experiential cultivation of the skills of care and compassion, students will be better able to engage and connect more effectively with others in their lives. In addition, they will be learning a key set of skills essential for thriving in the human services professions.

MATH 297 – Scientific Computation for Biology (3 credits)

SC 201 – Medical Professions (1 credit)
For students who are about a year away from applying to medical, PA, dental, PT, OT, or nursing school.

Spring 2020 Special Course: NURS 497 Health Disparities

This would be a terrific 400-level supporting course for NUTR majors.

Nursing Special Topics Course Offering – Spring 2020

NURS 497 (#20329)– Health Disparities (3 credits)

This course will explore contemporary health disparities in the United States. Students will be introduced to health outcomes that vary by sexual orientation, gender, race, and other social determinants of health. We will learn about frameworks that have been used to explain disparate health outcomes and healthcare and discuss how scientific data can serve as an impetus to improve well-being for everyone.

This class will meet on Mondays from 9:00 AM – 11:30 AM in 271 Willard Building and will be taught by Britney Wardecker, Ph.D., Assistant Professor in the College of Nursing.

There are no prerequisites, and the course is open to all University Park students.