Category Archives: Supporting Courses

Prerequisites changed for Nutrition 421: Food Culture and Health Trends

Nutrition 421: Food Culture and Health Trends (3) (US;IL) explores the social-political, historic, and geographic roots of food patterns, featuring specific cuisine areas and nutritional disease patterns. This course provides the cultural awareness needed by dietitians and any student of food and culture to participate in dietary exploration and change.

The only prerequisite for this course is NUTR 251, although others are currently listed in the course bulletin. It will be taught for the first time in a while by one of the newest faculty members in the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Stephen Kodish, Ph.D. who is also a faculty member in the Department of Biobehavioral Health.

For the full course description, please visit this link: NUTR 421.

Decorative logo for Summer Session 2018Photo of the Nittany Lion with the College of HHD logoStay on Track. Get Ahead.
Think Summer. Think Penn State.

Summer Session at Penn State’s College of Health and Human Development is a great time to:

  • Lighten your load for fall semester
  • Tackle a challenging class
  • Take a General Education course
  • Complete courses for your major or minor

Learn more about why Penn State is a great place to be in the summertime. Also, hear what HHD students have to say about Summer Session at Penn State.

NUTR Course Information

HHD Course Information

Flexibility and Fun

HHD classes afford flexibility in your schedule, too, with classes available throughout the day and evening. You even have access to our World Campus classes during the summer—online, on your time, and with lower tuition.

And taking classes isn’t the only reason a Penn State summer is good. State College has minor league baseball, the Central Pennsylvania Arts Festival, and great places to enjoy the summer weather—from hiking Mount Nittany to enjoying the Penn State outdoor pool to sharing a meal outside with friends at one of the great downtown restaurants.

Hear from other students why Summer Session is a great choice.

Questions

Have other questions about Summer Session? Visit the Penn State Summer Session site or contact our helpful staff in the Health and Human Development Center for Student Advising and Engagment at 814-865-2156.

#pennstatesummer

New Special Topics Course for Fall 2018 – NUTR 297 – Healthy Food For All: Factors that influence what we eat in the US

Pre-requisites: NUTR 100 or NUTR 251 or FDSC 105

While aspects of this are covered in a variety of disciplines (e.g., nutrition, food science, agriculture, economics, sociology, and others), these aren’t always integrated for students. The purpose of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary, systems perspective of how individuals make food choices within their communities, and how these choices impact health and wellness. Topics include an introduction to what we eat, why we eat, and the key roles of diet on health with focus on the links between food security and obesity. It is designed to give you knowledge surrounding a wide range of topics related to nutrition, food security, and obesity. This course will require you to think critically about and act upon broad nutrition issues specific to eating behavior, economics, and policy. Projects will expose you to varying perspectives on food security, obesity, food planning and budgeting. You will learn how to assess diet quality and health disparities, why they exist and persist, what policies affect them, and potential solutions to food insecurity and obesity in our society. In addition, you will get hands-on experience in a food laboratory where you will taste and cost out a variety of foods, prepare and evaluate an entrée at different price points, and plan and prepare a meal utilizing foods at the food bank.

HealthWorks Applications due March 2nd!

Are you passionate about health & wellness?  Then apply before you leave for spring break to become a Peer Educator through HealthWorks!  For more information, visit studentaffairs.psu.edu/health/wellness/healthWorks.shtml

Hurry because the application deadline is Friday, March 2, 2018.

 

Need a 400-Level Supporting Course? Consider….

Course Offering – Fall 2018

Supporting/Elective course opportunity: AGECO 197 – Growing Food, Leaders, and Community

AGECO 197: Growing Food, Leaders & Community is a new course that trains student farm interns and urban farm interns in Philadelphia offered by the interdisciplinary program in sustainability at Penn State.

Students will learn sustainable farm production, community engagement, volunteer management, and urban farming.  The class will take a spring break trip to Philadelphia.

For more information and to download and fill out the application go to:  http://www.studentfarm.psu.edu/get-involved/jobs/

New Supporting course option: The Future of Food

The Future of Food is a popular and exciting, new
introductory-level Natural AND Social Science course. It
emphasizes the challenges facing food systems in the
21st century, and issues of sustainability for agriculture,
as well as the challenges posed by food insecurity and
modern diets to human health and well-being. Topics
covered include introduction to the coupled-system
perspective, historical development of food systems,
socioeconomic aspects of the food system, interaction of
the food system with the Earth’s environment including
soil, water, biota and climate, and the future of the food
system considering changes such as in climate,
urbanization, and demography.

Course Instructor: Karl Zimmerer is professor in the
Geography Department and the Rural Sociology
program. He is an award-winning teacher who is
committed to issues of food, sustainability, and social
justice in rural and urban communities.

See the attached  The Future of Food Flyer for more details.

A new supporting course option: NUTR 297: Healthy Food for All: Bridging the Gap Between Policy and Poverty

Dr. Jennifer Savage-Williams is offering a new course called Healthy Food for All:  Bridging the Gap between Policy and Poverty in Spring 2018.  It will meet a lower-level supporting course or elective for the Nutritional Sciences major.

The class meets on Tuesday/Thursday from 1:35 pm to 2:50 pm.  The enrollment for the first offering is limited.  Once the class is filled, we will not be able to add more seats.  If you are interested, make sure you sign up today!

I have provided a detailed description of the class below:

This course encompasses the study of eating behavior and how fundamentals of nutrition-policy (e.g., food assistance and targeted supplementary nutritional supplementation programs in relation to Dietary Guidelines for Americans, Dietary Reference Intakes) and economics of food production and food choice affects the overall health, nutrition, and well-being of communities within our society. While aspects of this are covered in a variety of disciplines (e.g., nutrition, food science, agriculture, economics, sociology, and others), these aren’t always integrated for students. The purpose of this course is to provide an interdisciplinary, systems perspective of how individuals make food choices within their communities, and how these choices impact health and wellness. Topics include an introduction to what we eat, why we eat, and the key roles of diet on health with focus on the links between food security and obesity.  The politics of food discusses portions of the Farm Bill and Child Nutrition Act with focus on the Women, Infants and Children Supplementary Food Program (WIC), the Special Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and school lunch, and the influence these programs have on what is produced and consumed. The economics of food will focus on determinants of food choice and impact of food waste through hand-on experiential activities that will develop student food budgeting skills across income levels that provides perspective to eating healthy on a budget. Lastly, alternative food-system scenarios related to production and consumption, as well as social, economic, governance, health, and environmental dimensions will be discussed.

 

New Class for Spring – Medical Professions (1 credit)

SC 201: Medical Professions (1 credit)
 Open to all majors, 3rd semester or higher
 Ideal for students a year away from applying to health professional school
Regardless of your chosen health care field—medicine, dentistry, optometry, PA, PT, OT, podiatry—this ten-week class will help you prepare for health professional school. It will provide an overview of the application process, preparation tips for pre-professional exams, and overviews of current issues in health care such as dis-parities in access and outcomes, cultural competency, medical ethics, and interprofessionalism, among other possible topics. Self-assessment exercises will help you evaluate your preparation and plan additional improvements to your applicant profile.
TIME: Thu 9:05-10:20 AM
DATES: 01/18-3/29
262 Willard

SC 201 Flyer 2018-2g91nts

New Course to Train Student Farm Interns-AGECO 197: Growing Food, Leaders and Community

The Student Farm is excited to announce a NEW course for spring 2018. AGECO 197: Growing Food, Leaders and Community is a 3-credit course taught by Student Farm manager Leslie Pillen. The course is open to students in any major and any class standing. We will cover topics including sustainable farm management, leadership development, team building, volunteer management, community food systems engagement and individual/group teaching.

Students who complete the course will have priority consideration for an internship with the Student Farm at Penn State and/or with the Philadelphia Center urban agriculture summer internships. The course will be highly hands-on and will travel to Philadelphia during Spring Break, so enrollment is capped and requires an application to be considered.

This course can be used as a supporting course and would count toward the Community Nutrition and Food Security Emphasis Area.

Further details about the course and how to apply can be found at studentfarm.psu.edu. Please direct any questions to studentfarm@psu.edu.