Tag Archives: scheduling

Courses to consider for Spring 2017

There are a variety of interesting special topic courses related to Nutrition and Health being offerred this spring.  All would be appropriate for supporting courses.  The English and History courses could be petitioned for GH credit.  These courses were brought to my attention by the Penn State Science newsletter, an excellent resource for any of you interested in Health Care careers.  Premedicine and Prehealth E-Newsletter

 

Hist 197, Sec 001: The History of Epidemics | In the 14th century, a disease that came to be known as the Black Death emerged in Asia and spread along trade routes to Europe, killing an estimated two thirds of the population in one year. Using the Black Death as a starting point, this course will examine the history of epidemics 1350 to the present day through five case studies from across the globe: Black Death (14th century); smallpox (1775-82); cholera (1832-23); influenza (1918); and HIV/AIDS (1980s to the present). A central focus of our course is examining how epidemic and infectious diseases have shaped our world history socially, politically, environmentally, and economically to the present day. We will also examine human responses to epidemics and the ways in which their philosophical and moral implications were debated in artistic, cultural, and intellectual realms. This means that a significant portion of our work will center on analyzing primary sources from women and men who witnessed epidemics, treated the sick, lived and died during various epidemic outbreaks, and attempted to understand them from a range of perspectives. Questions will be investigated concerning epidemics and revolutionary change, social beliefs about disease and danger, the impact of epidemics on economic and social stratification, violence and scapegoating, and the relationship of political philosophies and legitimization of structures of public health and welfare. The final weeks of the course analyze contemporary “pandemic preparedness” policy and responses to health threats including vaccine controversies, the 2014 ebola outbreak, and the ongoing zika outbreak.

Engl 297, Sec 001: Narrative Medicine: Stories and Comics |  Narrative medicine emphasizes stories of illness, with a focus on recognizing, interpreting, and absorbing the needs and experiences of patients.

Kines 497, Sec 901: EKG Interpretation | The course is a combined lecture and lab course, focusing on hands-on skills and EKG packets that reinforce the lectures each week. Five EKG machines in the lab are available to students, who are taught how to read both 12-leads and single channel EKGs as well as several different EKG electrode placement configurations all of which should help them gain employment as EKG techs. A former student, who sent on to PA school, says: “We are taking a lot of content-heavy courses this spring because we are so close to rotations, which has made it a more stressful semester compared to others. I couldn’t imagine going through this semester without at least having a basic understanding of EKGs. Also, being that I’ve always had an interest in pursuing a career as a cardiology PA, I want to thank you so much for offering the EKG class; I can’t tell you how happy I am that I can go into cardiology lectures with a better understanding. They say that PA school is like drinking from a fire hose, which can make some students shy away from specialties that they were once interested in before beginning the curriculum. I can say that I am still 100% interested in going into cardiology, and the ability to read EKGs before I got to school is one of the reasons why.”

BIOL 297, Sec 001: Visual Body Studies in Anatomy | This course uses the field of anatomical illustration to explore the history of medicine and our understanding of the human body. Charting the influence of visual art and imaging systems as essential aspects of medicine, this survey of art and historical imagery connects the study of human anatomy with principles of visual literacy and design. In addition to researching historical publications through writing and discussions, students will produce a research portfolio based on illustrations examined in the course. Lab activities with human cadavers will help students learn the basics of human anatomy within a historical context. No fine arts skills are required to take this course: only an enthusiasm for the study of human anatomy and its visual history.

Soc 297, Sec 001 (AFAM 397): Urban Inequalities | This course provides orientation to the social, structural, ethnic, and ideological dimensions of modern US cities and their linked global environments. Focus is on historical and socio-economic determinants of inequalities including racial/ethnic divisions in economics; law enforcement; education; and environmental resources.  Models for explaining the formation of ghetto or disordered communities; uneven distribution of crime, preventable health problems; environmental hazards, and other social problems are explored.

CHE 497, Sec 2: Drug Delivery | This course will examine the application of chemical engineering principles (thermodynamics, transport, and kinetics) to the analysis of a number of interesting biomedical systems including temperature regulation, drug delivery, pharmacokinetics, and artificial organs. One of the goals of this course is to understand how engineers go about developing appropriate models for complex biological systems.  Emphasis will be placed on identifying the key physical/biological phenomena governing the system behavior; you do not need to have any background in Biology to take the course (I will provide the necessary background material as needed).   Where appropriate, we will also examine some of the social, political, and economic implications of biomedical engineering in our society, including the rapidly growing cost of medical technology.

HDFS 497, Sec 1: Health Technology and Personal Data Collection| In this class, we will examine upcoming health technologies such as wearables (e.g. FitBit, Apple Watch, etc), fitness and motivation apps, and online therapy and rehabilitation tools.  The class will focus on the application of these technologies, the individual data that can be collected from them, and the way that both the tech and the data can be used (and abused) by companies, scientists, health care providers, and the individuals themselves.  Topics will include technologies such as personal data collection tools like FitBits, motivational smartphone apps, and self-quantification web pages; technological modes of health treatment delivery such as robotic surgery, online psychotherapy, and virtual reality-based rehabilitation tools; and online data storage systems like Apple HealthKit and electronic health record systems.  For each of these topics, we will address state of the art and future directions as well the potential advantages and disadvanatages of such systems for personal health, practitioner health care and treatment, individual privacy, scientific research, corporate/business interests, and public policy decision making.

 

New Plant Science Course – Genetics of Plant Metabolites, Plants and Human Health

Plant Sciences is offerring a new course that might be worth considering for a 400 level supporting course.   The objective of this course is to provide students an interdisciplinary approach involving genetics, breeding, biochemistry and biotechnology to understand the biosynthesis and the role of plant metabolites in plant and human health.  See the attached flyer for additinal information.

HORT 497B Genetics of plant metabolites_Plant and Human Health

Scheduling Nutr 371- Internship Application Development – for Fall 2015

We have had several inquiries about scheduling NUTR 371 for fall semester.  You are eligible to schedule the course if you meet these criteria:

  • You are graduating Spring 2016 or Summer 2016
  • You are in the DIETETCS OPTION
  • You have a C or better in all courses required for the verification statement (NUTR-DITCS UP 8-Semester Plan FA12 (1))

To Schedule the course, please pick up a purple Drop/Add form in the Nutritional Sciences office (110 Chandlee Lab).  Fill out the top part of the form.   You do not need to indicate which section of the class you will be in or obtain an instructor’s signature.  We will assign students evenly between the two sections.  Please attach your advising transcript to the form (you can print this out from elion) and turn it in to Mr. Scott Barbara in the Nutritional Sciences office.

We will add the course to your schedule mid-April.

Please contact Mrs. Eissenstat or Dr. Coleman Kelly if you have questions.

Scheduling Full or Controlled Nutrition Classes

Attention Sophomores and Freshmen needing a nutrition class for Spring 2015.

Seats are currently available in Nutr 360, but it is controlled for students officially in the major. If you are a pre-major student (HHD status) and would like to take Nutr 360 this spring, please meet with one of the pre-major advisers, Mrs. Kelly or Mrs. Eissenstat.  We can determine if you are eligible to declare the major now, or sign your drop/add form so you can be added to the class while still in HHD status.  Nutr 251 is a prerequisite for this class.  Drop/add forms are available in the Nutrition office, 110 Chandlee.   Any student who needs to take Nutr 251 this spring, should do the same.  We will attempt to accommodate every freshman currently tracking Nutrition.  The class is showing as full on the schedule of courses.  But, some hidden seats are available in each section.  You are most likely to get into  section 003, the Wednesday afternoon class .  So, keep that in mind as you plan the remainder of your schedule.

Contact your adviser if you have any questions about the appropriateness of these classes for your situation.

Is it time to visit your academic adviser?

The leaves are turning, classes are in full swing and fall is truly here; but should you be thinking about spring?  Juniors are currently scheduling for spring semester and Sophomores and Freshmen will be right behind them.  If you aren’t sure exactly when you schedule classes for spring semester, you can find your date in a couple places:  Your Degree Audit and a new app on elion, Registration Calendar.  Check either to find your schedule date.  Although we have many resources available on line to help you plan your schedule, it is always a good idea to visit your adviser.  Electives, supporting courses, general education and prerequisites can be tricky.  Call the Nutritional Sciences office (814 863-0806) at least two weeks before your scheduled registration date to make an appointment with Mrs. Kelly and Mrs. Eissenstat. The Nutrition Office is open from 7:30 AM – 5:00 PM Monday through Friday.  You can also stop in to the office at 110 Chandlee lab.  When you call or visit , have your student ID number and calendar available so you can select a convenient appointment time.  You can contact the other advisers by phone or email.  Their contact information can be found on page two of the blog.  Enjoy the beautiful fall weather, but plan now for spring.  Some classes fill quickly and you don’t want to miss out.

Scheduling Notes for Fall 2014 – New Courses and Name Changes

Two Interesting 400 level supporting courses are available in Nutrition this fall.

NUTR 497A  Eating and Weight Disorders (3) This new course will discuss theories and controversies in the literature on eating and weight disorders. Part of the course will be lecture based and will provide background on the diagnosis, causes, consequences, and treatment of eating and weight-related disorders. Part of the course will be reading and discussion-based where you will be required to read classic, historical, and scientific research papers and participate in critical discussions about these papers in class. Eating and weight disorders that will be covered include both classic disorders (e.g. anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa) as well as more recently identified disorders (e.g. binge eating disorder, night eating syndrome). We will also discuss obesity and its relationship to disordered eating. Students will be evaluated by exams, quizzes, assignments, and class participation. The assessments will include a critical interview with an individual who has struggled with eating and weight-related disorders.

NUTR 425 (IL) Global Nutrition Problems: Health, Science, and Ethics (3) Examines causes of malnutrition and health problems in low-income countries; explores international cultures and ethical issues related to hunger.

In case you missed the earlier post about the name change for HRIM. 

Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Management classes have not disappeared from the fall 14 schedule of courses, they have just been renamed  “Hospitality Management”.  Certainly less of a mouthful.  HM 329 is the same as HRIM 329, etc.  The newly titled courses will automatically be substituted for the older designations on your degree audits.

Scheduling NUTR 371 – Dietetic Internship Application Development

We have had several inquiries about scheduling NUTR 371 for fall semester.  You are eligible to schedule the course if you meet these criteria:

  • You are graduating Spring 2015 or Summer 2015
  • You are in the DIETETCS OPTION
  • You have a C or better in all courses required for the verification statement (NUTR-DITCS UP 8-Semester Plan FA12 (1))

To Schedule the course, please pick up a purple Drop/Add form in the Nutritional Sciences office (110 Chandlee Lab).  Fill out the top part of the form.   You do not need to indicate which section of the class you will be in or obtain an instructor’s signature.  We will assign students evenly between the two sections.  Please attach your advising transcript to the form (you can print this out from elion) and turn it in to Mr. Scott Barbara in the Nutritional Sciences office.

We will add the course to your schedule soon after the form is received.

Please contact Mrs. Eissenstat or Dr. Coleman Kelly if you have questions.

Aside

Hotel Restaurant and Institutional Management classes have not disappeared from the fall 14 schedule of courses, they have just been renamed  “Hospitality Management”.  Certainly less of a mouthful.  HM 329 is the same as HRIM 329, etc.  The newly titled … Continue reading

Need an interesting GH or supporting course? Try “Eating Your Ecology”

Eating Your Ecology:  Current Trends in Food Writing and Environmentalism (English 297C)
This course is an opportunity to look at how writers from Thomas Jefferson to Michael Pollan have written about food and its production in the United States, but beyond that the course delivers the following:

  • Class that meets from 6:00-8:00 Thursday evenings in 209 Hammond
  • 3 credits of English 297B, which can be petitioned to count as a GH or would work as a supporting course
  • Food in every class to emphasize that food is a cultural artifact that always comes with a story
  • Three trips to nearby farms to learn how our food is produced and eat the food the farm produces, prepared by the people who run the farm

A final class dinner in May that will use the class’s lessons and food grown at the farms the class visits to prepare a communal meal. There is a small course fee for “Eating Your Ecology” to cover the cost of transportation and fees paid to visit the farms and provide students with food ($175).  This course is a great opportunity to discover community at Penn State while learning about how those plastic-wrapped packages of meat, fruits, and veggies wind up in the grocery store.

Schedule # 269971   Currently 12 seats remaining.

Need Help Adding a course that is full?

During the first 10 days of the semester you can add and drop courses from your schedule without penalty. (Students with financial aid should not go below their starting credits for the semester. If you need to drop one class and add something else, do it on the same day.  Otherwise, this may have implications on aid.)  Spring semester drop period ends January 22, and the add period ends at 8am January 23. Many students are dropping and adding courses during this period, so gaining entry into a course that you want is likely if you utilize eLion’s Course Watch List. You can add multiple courses and sections to the Course Watch List. When a seat opens you will receive a notification (either via text message or email) alerting you to the opening. You need to act quickly, because everyone on the watch list is getting the same notification.

Another option is to ask the course instructor for permission to be added into their section. This is usually done via email. Usually the course instructor’s email address can be found on the Schedule of Courses (schedule.psu.edu). Make sure that your request is clearly-written, concise and polite. If the instructor agrees to add you to the course they will request that you provide them with a Registration Add/Drop form. This form can be found here (on the Registrar’s website). You should fill out the form completely before asking for the instructor’s signature. The signed form is submitted to the Department offering the course or the University Registrar’s Office (112 Shields Building). Good luck!

Shawnee Kelly  MS, RD LDN