Chinese

For my first post of the second semester I decided to order Chinese food.  Conveniently enough I was able to order off orderup.com and ordered from China Dragon.  I went with the chicken and broccoli dish, which was pretty good and they gave you a decent amount.  My only complaint is that the food took almost an hour to get there so by the time it came I was starving (so I probably would have thought anything was good).

Chinese food is a classic across the world, with many different restaurants.  However traditional Chinese food is quite different from the type we get here.  There are 8 Culinary Traditions of Chinese food that each specialize in different ingredients and cooking methods.  The different types of traditions are Anhui, Cantonese, Fujian, Hunan,Jiangsu, Shandong, Szechuan, and Zhejiang.  The Anhui tradition uses wild herbs and is also known for its simple preparation.  Cantonese food is what most of us regard as “Chinese food” with much focus on meat.  Much of these styles also coincide with different regions within China.   For example, Zhejiang tradition comes from the region of the same name and highlights foods that have a fresh, soft flavor and a mellow fragrance.

Though China has its regional differences, there are also staple items across all areas of the nation’s cuisine.  Rice, a staple of Asia overall, is tradition in Chinese dishes.  It is used in most dishes.  Another staple of Chinese food is tofu or soybeans, which are used as an alternative to meat for protein.  Noodles are also very prominent in dishes, either served in soups or fried as toppings.  The Shou Mian variety of noodles is known to symbolize long life and good health.

Drinks are also essential to Chinese cuisine.  Tea and herbal tea are popular, for China was the earliest nation to drink tea.  Similar to food, tea is different in many different regions.  Another popular drink in China is baijiu, a white liquor.  It makes up 99.5% of the liquor market in China, making it the most consumed alcohol in the world.

 

 

Fun Facts:

Contrary to the United States, fortune cookies are hardly ever consumed.

The average Chinese diet has 2700 calories a day, however since its a balanced diet of grains, vegetables, tea and meat they hardly ever gain much weight

Chinese do not like forks and knives, but rather eat only with chopsticks

Ice cream first originated in China

 

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