U01: Giving into Social Media in the Workplace

Social media is a large part of our society today. Just about everyone uses some form of social media. When you look at the number of users, the data is amazing especially when you think back to a decade ago, when social media didn’t even exist. The chart below is an indicator as to the number of users on the different social media sites, as of April 2016. Many people have access to social media while at work, whether it be on their work computer or on their cell phone. The temptation is there because it is so easily accessible. And most can’t resist the urge…..

data(www.smartinsights.com)

“Vices are seen as weaknesses of the will or inability to control one’s desires.” (PSU) A notification comes through your phone for facebook; of course you are curious to see what it is. You think it will only take a minute, so you check it out. Then you see start to look at something else that caught your eye and it turns into another five minutes. “Temptations are situations that entice a person to violate ethical codes of conduct.” (PSU) The use of social media in the workplace is an example of vices and temptations. While it seems innocent to just take a quick look at your computer or your phone at facebook, it is taking away time from doing your work. Social media is distracting and affects your work and the organizations as a whole.

Social media can also affect the organization in an adverse way if their employees are posting negative comments about the organization. Therefore, some companies today have a social media policy in place. “Offensive behavior and image issues are among the most common problems that surface when employees mix business with personal use of social-networking sites.” (Henricks) Therefore, having a policy in a place will allow control of this behavior or if needed, action to be taken, if the policy is violated. Employees need to stop giving in to their temptations and vices and not post during business hours. It is also important to think about what you are posting before you post, it in order to avoid any violation of your company’s social media policy.

 

References:

Chaffey, David. Global social media research summary 2016 Retrieved on 9/22/16. http://www.smartinsights.com/social-media-marketing/social-media-strategy/new-global-social-media-research/

Penn State University. (2016). Unit 1: Lesson 2: Vice and temptations [Canvas]. Ethics and Leadership. Retrieved from http://psu.instructure.com/

Henricks, Mark Why You Need a Social Media Policy Retrieved on 9/22/16 https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/217813

 

 

2 Comments

  1. Erika Gatis September 25, 2016 at 1:21 PM #

    Kimberly,

    I enjoyed reading your blog because everything you said about social media temptations in the workplace is very true. We all get caught up when that notification bubble pops up on our screens and think, “Just one minute won’t hurt anything” and then like you said, there’s something else eye catching and that one minute turns into ten or twenty minutes. Once that distraction is there, your mind has a hard time refocusing on what the prior task was and that is where errors occur. From our reading material in Lesson 02, McAfee made an excellent point in his article about social media and online advancements, “today’s digital workplace tools, the ones that are supposed to be making us so much more productive, seem to instead serve up endless diversions from the high road of effective and efficient knowledge work” (2010).

    I appreciate that you took the time to suggest a way to help prevent workplace social media disruptions by installing a policy to monitor employees and that form of technology distraction. One I have used with my employees when they could not overcome their vices and the temptations on their phones was to put their phones in a box and they could only use them on their breaks or make them leave their phones in their cars. It sounds cruel and maybe like we’re treating them like children, but when their work productivity is suffering and they are forgetting to finish jobs or not doing them correctly, it’s not worth the risk of one of customers getting injured over their distractedness.

    I agree with you about the way a disgruntled employee may write a negative post about the business on one of the social media platforms. The only good thing here is that it is public and would be easy to find. For me as someone that helps run a business, if I were to find such negative posts it would be cause for termination. We work hard to maintain a good reputation in the auto industry and we have enough negative imagery to fight because of the pre-conceived notions about used car dealerships, that I cannot risk having an employee say such things. Thankfully we’re a pretty tight knit group and if a question or concern arises we can help solve it before it turns into anything more.

    -Erika

    Reference

    McAfee, A. (2010, August 2). Rising Above Tech’s Temptations. Retrieved September 07, 2016, from http://www.forbes.com/2010/08/02/internet-social-media-technology-cio-network-mcafee.html

  2. Erika Gatis September 25, 2016 at 1:20 PM #

    Kimberly,

    I enjoyed reading your blog because everything you said about social media temptations in the workplace is very true. We all get caught up when that notification bubble pops up on our screens and think, “Just one minute won’t hurt anything” and then like you said, there’s something else eye catching and that one minute turns into ten or twenty minutes. Once that distraction is there, your mind has a hard time refocusing on what the prior task was and that is where errors occur. From our reading material in Lesson 02, McAfee made an excellent point in his article about social media and online advancements, “today’s digital workplace tools, the ones that are supposed to be making us so much more productive, seem to instead serve up endless diversions from the high road of effective and efficient knowledge work” (2010).

    I appreciate that you took the time to suggest a way to help prevent workplace social media disruptions by installing a policy to monitor employees and that form of technology distraction. One I have used with my employees when they could not overcome their vices and the temptations on their phones was to put their phones in a box and they could only use them on their breaks or make them leave their phones in their cars. It sounds cruel and maybe like we’re treating them like children, but when their work productivity is suffering and they are forgetting to finish jobs or not doing them correctly, it’s not worth the risk of one of customers getting injured over their distractedness.

    I agree with you about the way a disgruntled employee may write a negative post about the business on one of the social media platforms. The only good thing here is that it is public and would be easy to find. For me as someone that helps run a business, if I were to find such negative posts it would be cause for termination. We work hard to maintain a good reputation in the auto industry and we have enough negative imagery to fight because of the pre-conceived notions about used car dealerships, that I cannot risk having an employee say such things. Thankfully we’re a pretty tight knit group and if a question or concern arises we can help solve it before it turns into anything more.

    -Erika

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