RCL 10

The History of Capital Punishment

HofPC Concept Contract for Nebraska Hernandez, Roan Lynch, Mark Ma, Ninad Mahajan, Andrew Pei, and Billy Young

 

Topic: The controversy surrounding capital punishment and the use of the death penalty in the United States.

 

An examination of the moral, social, and economic implications of the death penalty in the United States. Analyzes the extensive history of capital punishment and torture as well as their psychological effects on civilizations and mentalities. As a society, should we keep the death penalty? How much is a life worth?

 

Research, Roles, and Responsibilities:

Nebraska: The ancient history of torture and capital punishment as a means of interrogation. Nebraska will research whether the original intentions of the death penalty have changed. He will also examine public outcry to these methods prior to the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Nebraska is responsible for helping to create the storyboard of the video.

 

Roan: Modern, recent tactics of torture and capital punishment as used by police authorities and the government. Roan will also research whether the original intentions of the death penalty have changed. He is responsible for analyzing the current, present-day controversy and debate over the U.S. death penalty. Roan is also responsible for helping to create the storyboard of the video.

 

Mark: Potential rationales and justifications for the use of torture, capital punishment, and the death penalty. Mark will act as the mediator between both sides of the controversy, researching the reasons for each side feels the way it does. Mark is also responsible for researching individual stories and case studies of the death penalty, diving into the lives of prisoners and their families who may be directly affected by the death penalty. Mark is responsible for editing the video and adding appropriate graphics and visual aids.

 

Andrew: The economic effects of the death penalty. Andrew will analyze the fiscal impact of using capital punishment throughout history, and most important, in the last decade. Andrew will research the financial costs of death row and the prison system as a whole. He will then compare the costs of the death penalty with alternatives researched and analyzed by Ninad. Andrew is responsible for providing narration and related audio services for the video.

 

Ninad: Potential alternatives to the death penalty. Ninad is responsible for researching probable solutions and proposed alternatives to capital punishment, spanning hundreds of years of history. Ninad’s research is important because it will add or diminish credibility to the arguments for using the death penalty. Ninad is also responsible for editing the video and adding finishing touches.

 

Billy: The moral and ethical ramifications of using the death penalty, as well as how the use of torture and capital punishment may violate intrinsic human rights. Billy will explore the philosophy behind the death penalty as well as examine the underlying mentalities surrounding its purpose. He is responsible for explaining the psychological and philosophical effects of the death penalty spanning decades of its use. Billy will argue whether or not the rationales and justifications researched by Mark are supported by the death penalty’s moral implications. Billy is responsible for providing narration with Andrew and editing the video using Adobe Premiere Pro.

 

Signed,

Nebraska Hernandez

Roan Lynch

Mark Ma

Ninad Mahajan

Andrew Pei

Billy Young

Ted Talk Outline

Does the development of new scientific technologies always give the world a better life and have a positive effect on the course of history?
Has technology done more to help or to hinder society?
technology has done more to help society.
-more safety
-better food
-more entertainment
-technology is the main power of the human
-save people’s life
-pass message faster
-know what’s the weather today
-better communication
-more convenient way to travel
-find the information you need faster
-find out the truth we didn’t know before (wave-particle dualism)
For most people, it is an obvious answer for that statement, because new technologies have become part of our life. However, in a short story, called “The Weapon”, Frederic Brown tells us about a story of a visitor Mr. Niemand tried to convince Dr. Graham who was working on a new weapon to stop his experiment. But Dr. Graham refused to follow what did Mr. Niemand said. Finally, that “madman” gives a loaded revolver to Dr. Graham’s son-Harry a boy with a mental handicap as a gift to show that new technology is often a double-edged sword, which means it doesn’t always have the positive effects for people; sometimes people can’t even handle the new technology.
World War II had one of the highest death rates in human history, but it also was known as a time that led to the development of new scientific techniques. According to statistics, there were more than seventy million innocent people died in that six years period. Atomic bomb first time appeared with the life and blood of our brethren. an American bomber dropped the world’s first deployed atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people; three days later, a second bomber dropped another A-bomb on Nagasaki, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure. On the other hand, the arms race seemed like to be the only theme of the Cold War, which endangered international relations by both USA and Soviet sides.
The afraid of the war turned into the hippie movement, the most famous sign represents the peace-V sign.  In the 1950s the “peace sign”, as it is known today, was designed by Gerald Holtom as the logo for the British Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, a group at the forefront of the peace movement in the UK, and adopted by anti-war and counterculture activists in the US and elsewhere. V-sign was the sign that represented the victory for WWII. Furthermore, the V-sign has a long history representing the victory since Hundred Years’ War, this origin legend dictates that the English and Welsh archers who were captured by the French had their index and middle fingers cut off so that they could no longer operate their longbows, and that the V Sign was used by uncaptured and victorious archers in a display of defiance against the enemy. But that origin hasn’t got proved yet.
]

RCL #8

Does the development of new scientific technologies always give the world a better life and have a positive effect on the course of history? For most people, it is an obvious answer for that statement, because new technologies have become part of our life. However, in a short story, called “The Weapon”, Frederic Brown tells us about a story of a visitor Mr. Niemand tried to convince Dr. Graham who was working on a new weapon to stop his experiment. But Dr. Graham refused to follow what did Mr. Niemand said. Finally, that “madman” gives a loaded revolver to Dr. Graham’s son-Harry a boy with a mental handicap as a gift to show that new technology is often a double-edged sword, which means it doesn’t always have the positive effects for people; sometimes people can’t even handle the new technology.

World War II had one of the highest death rates in human history, but it also was known as a time that led to the development of new scientific techniques. According to statistics, there were more than seventy million innocent people died in that six years period. Atomic bomb first time appeared with the life and blood of our brethren. an American bomber dropped the world’s first deployed atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The explosion wiped out 90 percent of the city and immediately killed 80,000 people; three days later, a second bomber dropped another A-bomb on Nagasaki, killing an estimated 40,000 people. Tens of thousands more would later die of radiation exposure. On the other hand, the arms race seemed like to be the only theme of the Cold War, which endangered international relations by both USA and Soviet sides.
Has technology done more to help or to hinder society?
technology has done more to help society.
-more safety
-better food
-more entertainment
-technology is the main power of the human
-save people’s life
-pass message faster
-know what’s the weather today
-better communication
-more convenient way to travel
-find the information you need faster
-find out the truth we didn’t know before (wave-particle dualism)

Conflict In My Passion

Even though Addario has strong inside passion about her career, she is still facing a conflict that against her morals. She is worrying about picturing for those tortured people, that suffering pains from the war, and taking benefits from those pictures is a major conflict. As her view, she is wondering what those New York Times’ readers are rather seeing animals in the zoo than those pictures of the truth sides of the war.

Nonetheless, she ends up justifying her career. She uses those picture to encourage citizens in worldwide to take attention into the war and tries to change the situation with her own power and desires.

As my personal experiences, I had conflict dealing with the relationship between the children and their parents. I was always thinking that the lack of knowledge caused those parents refused to take actions when they heard the reports about their children might have Autism: the anger and distrust regarding the results that the specialist determined. I have come to realize and see the need for increased awareness of these diseases as well as knowledge regarding the implications of ASD for parents in China. In my opinion, children’s parents didn’t realize that late speaking could be considered as an indication or symptom of something far more serious because they lacked understanding and knowledge of ASD.

After that, I voiced my opinions to my mother regarding the need to spread awareness through informational brochures in order to support a trainer’s results when presenting the situation to parents. My mom listened carefully, smiling as she said: “Strengthening publicity is important for sure; however, have you considered the feelings of the parents?” I contemplated this question and realized that no, I had not. I never took into account the perspective and emotions of the parents. I had only blindly imposed the idea that I thought would be beneficial for them whereas those feelings of shock and resistance are actually instinctual as parents.

The V-Sign

The V-sign
Nowadays, when you see someone raises and parts the index and middle finger, while the other fingers are clenched, we called it the “V-sign”, and generally, people think it as a sign of peace. That idea about peace was posted during “Make love, not war” in order to against Vietnam War and considered as the counterculture of the 1960s, also called the peace movement.
However, the V-sign was represented Victory before that and became well-known after Churchill used it in his speech, also other allied leaders used the sign as well against Germany, so the V-sign was the sign that represented the victory for WWII. Furthermore, the V-sign has a long history representing the victory since Hundred Years’ War, this origin legend dictates that the English and Welsh archers who were captured by the French had their index and middle fingers cut off so that they could no longer operate their longbows, and that the V Sign was used by uncaptured and victorious archers in a display of defiance against the enemy. But that origin hasn’t got proved yet.
Over your thinking, V-sign has been considered as an offensive gesture, a way that you show you’re disrespectful for someone else, the insulting version of the gesture is often compared to the offensive gesture known as “the finger”. The “two-fingered salute”, is commonly performed by flicking the V upwards from wrist or elbow. The V sign, when the palm is facing toward the person giving the sign, has long been an insulting gesture in England, and later in the rest of the United Kingdom, Ireland, Australia, India, Pakistan and New Zealand. It is frequently used to signify defiance (especially to authority), contempt, or derision.
The fun thing is: in Asia, people use V-sign when they are taking pictures. It is used in both casual and formal settings instead of insulting.
Source:
“Two fingers up to English history….” The BS Historian, 12 Dec. 2009,
     bshistorian.wordpress.com/2007/07/02/two-fingers-up-to-english-history/. Accessed 3 Oct. 2017.

Speech about Hammer and Sickle

Mark Ma

Professor Hamilton

English 137, Section 009

09/20/2017

When you see the portraits of Stalin or Mao Tse-tung, what are some words that first come to your mind? Red Terror? Excruciation? Or Repression? How about the symbol of “Communism”: Hammer and Sickle? Is this next Nazi’s symbolism? However, at this moment, I want to discuss the original idea and the origin about this artifact, the real “Communism“: why “Communism” is abused and the misunderstanding by Western society. Hopefully, after my speech, you could all have a brand-new view of Communism instead of some stereotypes you heard from media or even the government.

 

  • The history of Hammer and Sickle
    •  Was conceived during the Russian Revolution
      • The hammer represented for industrial laborers
      • The sickle represented for peasantry
    • Why was this artifact used?
      • Represented the worker-peasant alliance worked as a whole (also called Bolsheviks led by Lenin)
      • Against White movement (represented the ruling class, like Tsar)
      • And Allied intervention during the Revolution (represented foreign Capitalism).
    • After WWI and Russian Civil war
      • Was used as the emblem of the USSR
      • Caused several Communist movements in worldwide.
    • Nowadays
      • Communist Party of China
      • Represented the fundamental interests of working class and broad masses.
      • Only 4 countries left under “Communism”: China, Cuba, Lao, and Vietnam.

Transition: At this point, you probably still confused about why “communism” can be called Red terror, because “Communism” is still a symbol of most of the people’s interests against ruling class (we called that democracy) instead of autarchy. Then the next topic I’m going to talk about the real “Communism” and how this idea was abused.

 

  • The theoretical basis-Marxism (formed by Marx and Engels)
    • General Purpose
      • From each according to his ability, to each according to his need
      • to establish a communist society, which is a socioeconomic order structured upon the common ownership of the means of production and the absence of social classes, money and the state.
        • The whole society produces goods based on the needs instead of interests
      • Against Capitalism
        • Capitalism – The best way to work with exploitation is to allow anyone to do it, too.
          • Bourgeoisie- people who owned physical capital- tools that used to produce goods
          • Proletariat-people who sell their labor without the tools to produce goods by themselves
        • Making working opportunity is a lie, which caused exploitation
      • Capitalism-Socialism-Communism
      • It was mostly economic theory! Not political

Transition: That information above was the general idea about the real “Communism” that a theoretic perfect society that formed by Marx and Engels, a utopian conception. However, after the death of Marx, his theory divided into two major factions: Comintern and Revisionism.

  • Comintern
    • Like Leninism, then Stalin and Mao used this theory.
      • The revolution could start right now and would be successful soon.
        • Armed rebellion
        • Use violence to destroy all the wealth, law, morality and even the flesh of the bourgeoisie, strongly resisted by the capitalist countries.
        • Succeeded in Russia, China and etc.
  • Revisionism
    • Also called democratic socialism
      • An ideology that supports economic and social interventions to promote social justice within the framework of a capitalist economy
      • Nowadays, can be found in Northern Europe
        • Didn’t get that much of resistance compared to Comintern
      • The one that Marx realized when he near to die

Transition: Those two factions all came from the same idea but had such a different results and consequences. Moreover, the stereotypes were raised by the United States during the cold war and used it as an enemy to fight against for.

  • The name “Communist State”
    • Used to call USSR and other “communist” countries.
    • However, the Totalitarianism they tried to blame was not Communism at all!!!
      • Those countries didn’t even call themselves as Communism because communism was their supreme goal.
  • Freedom, Utopia, and mandatory
    • Having a Utopia is not terrible, but when someone’s Utopia became mandatory for everyone in the country, then everything becomes terrible
      • White Terror
      • Red Terror

Conclusion: Farewell to Utopia is always easy, but it is difficult to get out of mandatory. Politically correct is always mandatory but it changed so quick in a short period of time. The United States used to strongly condemn an enemy called “Communist State” and didn’t establish a diplomatic relation until 1976; by the way, People’s Republic of China was established at 1949. However, nowadays, China has become the biggest trade partner and you can easily find “Made in China” sign, especially in Wal-Mart. I heard a sentence before that represent that situation the most: “ The weapon is not an evil, but the people use it.”  Our values and morals are always changing, but the true diamond won’t.

Yesterday Once More

In her book, It’s What I do, she used vivid description and images to show about her experience happened during the period before and after 9/11. In this chapter, she started with the story with the relationships with her boyfriend Uxval, and his misunderstanding of her work at the War Zone, but going to the pictures from front line was Addario’s because she believes only the vivid images from the place where events that truly happened would be the most mind-blowing. So according to her story, I realized that only after you experience or truly understand something, then you would know the best way to achieve your goal. Like my experience happened with that patient and the Ebook I donated.

I start the Warmth Project after meeting cardiothoracic surgeon Dr. Xu at the Zhejiang Children’s Hospital in 9th grade.

He taught me that many young children in the area suffered from congenital heart disease because of exposure to pollution. I decided to find a way to make their hospital stays a little easier, and my solution was to give the children e-readers, something fun and educational for while in bed. We raised money through our community, and I felt proud that I could make their lives a little better.

In the second year, however, I went back and visited one of the children to whom we had given one of the e-readers; he was still in the hospital. However, when I asked him where he was, he seemed to look away and get nervous. The doctor pulled me aside to tell me that his family had sold it.

I couldn’t believe that they would be so disrespectful over a gift that cost lots of organized time and energy to purchase. Was it a waste?

But, as Dr. Xu explained, he and others came from poor families, who had extreme difficulty paying for medical treatment—the last thing the family needed was an e-reader.

I was immediately mortified by my self-righteous response, and it made me question my motivations for the work I had done. A true benefactor, I concluded, should do good deeds for others for no reason besides altruism. By recognizing this, I decided to transform my charity to focus on paying for medical bills for low-income families rather than paying for their kids’ entertainment. By working to improve my community, I realized that there are degrees to impact and that, moving forward, I should focus on impacting my world where it needs the most help, like Addiro who encouraged so many people to set up awareness against the war.

Your life isn’t just about get alone

Addario started the story with an “unexpected kiss with Uxval who had attracted Addario with his decisiveness, which naturally remained her about the conversation Nana, her grandmother. Nana loved Ernie, who was a good provider and gave her freedom and stayed her whole life with him but she had inside passion and heartfelt love with Sal who had no money but could satisfy her passion and her imagine about life. Because of that story that Nana told, Addario never wants to regret the kisses she missed, and kind of explained her crazy behaviors in her memoir.

Personally, I consider my passion deeply rooted in my heart. Even though my life turned into a flabby endless loop, your passion would still be readily combustible after a spark appeal, and then, the single spark starts the prairie fire. I have my own passion about charity since I learned the adage from my mom: “The fragrance always remains in the hand that gives the rose,” and there is a good feeling a person gets when he or she does something positive for others.

However, people often identify nonprofit leadership with a “good feeling,” but the reality is more complex than that. Leading a charity taught me that worthwhile results occurred because I was flexible to change and adapt to other situations. Ultimately, my efforts depended on my goals, my organizational ability, and the maintaining to buy-in from my team of volunteers. Doing all this presented the organization with new challenges—it was hard to look at a list of names longer than we could manage and try to address large costs such as health care bills. When we rose to the challenge, however, we got an even greater reward: we had not only done a good deed but had overcome obstacles that were insurmountable for the families we assisted.

 

 

 

Special-needs with concerned love

Special-needs with concerned love

“Are you kidding me? My son speaks slowly, but how can you call that severe? Who taught you how to be a doctor?”

My mother is the principal of a specialized school that focuses on children with ADHD and autism. Her primary duty is to facilitate communication between parents and children who have been diagnosed with these conditions. For the past three years, she has given me the chance work at this school, exposing me to many frustrated parents. This is where I found out my inside passion deeply in my heart.

This screaming father had a child, diagnosed with atypical autism with amentia at the age of three. He could not utter a single meaningful word. When I handed the report to the parents, the dad immediately tore it up and furiously threw the paper scraps into the doctor’s face. He slammed the front door of the office as he stormed off in a fury.

I’ve seen this over and over. My inside passion about the subject is my personal study of developmental disorders because of the need for increased general awareness of these conditions among parents and the public. The aforementioned father clearly failed to realize that slow speech could indicate autism spectrum disorder and the need for specialized learning options for the child to achieve his potential.

After that explosive episode, however, I wanted to take matters into my own hands and spread informational brochures to every parent on campus. My mom listened carefully and smiled as she asked me how I planned to make these pamphlets navigate the emotional touchiness that surrounds the issue. I paused and realized that I had not taken into account the parents’ emotions. I neglected the human side to these issues, which may never be solved with simple information; I had learned a lot about my favorite academic subject, but still lacked understanding about communicating that knowledge effectively.

Moving forward, I still want to educate parents who worry about their children on the autism spectrum. By making the information accessible from diagnosis through treatment, I will one day improve children’s lives by helping special-need children with their treatments while respecting their parents.