Calendar

October 23, 2018
  • “Countering Disposability: Black Mobility and Resistance in the Age of Revolution” with Michele Reid-Vazquez

    October 23, 2018 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm 160 Willard Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

    Reid-Vazquez will discuss the ways people of African descent countered disposability in the revolutionary era. From the onset of the Haitian Revolution to the closing of the Latin American wars for independence in the early nineteenth century, men and women of African heritage laid claim to the insurgent ideologies of liberty and equality – ideas that were not meant to apply to them. Black soldiers, refugees, and migrants used geopolitical warfare in the Caribbean basin to craft counter-discourses of freedom and citizenship. This turbulent space also fostered new assemblages of mobility that linked multiple geographies in the quest for racial equality. By engaging these combined modes of resistance, people of African descent envisioned and demanded an alternative reality to enslavement and colonialism.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about Michele Reid-Vazquez HERE

  • Reservation at Gigi's Southern Table

    October 23, 2018 @ 7:30 pm - 9:00 pm Gigi's Southern Table, 2080 Cato Ave., State College, PA, United States, 16801

    Gigi's Southern Table
    2080 Cato Ave., State College, PA, United States, 16801
    +1 814-861-3463

October 24, 2018
  • Faculty/Grad workshop with Michele Reid-Vazquez: “Documenting Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latino Mobilities”

    October 24, 2018 @ 10:00 am - 11:30 am

    Afro-Latin American Studies and Afro-Latino Studies are burgeoning, interconnected research fields at the intersection of Africana Studies andLatin American Studies. Both arenas give voice to the racial, social, cultural, and political struggles and resiliency of communities of Afro-Latin origin in Latin America and the U.S. Moreover, the past few decades have witnessed a surge in multidisciplinary scholarship in these fields that address colonial and modern diasporas, race and gender relations, and transnationalism across the Americas. This workshop seeks to forge a deeper link between Afro-Latin American and Afro-Latino Studies by exploring examples of sources (archival, literary, oral, digital, and visual) that scholars engage to analyze historical and contemporary experiences of Afro-Latin Americans and Afro-Latinos.

    For more information or to RSVP, email mellonsawyer@psu.edu

January 31, 2019
  • “Tragic but Not Criminal: Challenging the ‘Objective Reasonableness’ of Police Killings” with Lisa Cacho

    January 31, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 118 Lewis Katz Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

    This presentation examines how police killings are racialized and gendered by focusing on the ways in which violence against women, girls, and gender non-conforming people of color are rarely represented as a crime. While race renders criminality legible and recognizable, criminality adheres to the bodies of women, girls, and gender non-conforming people of color differently, which makes their experiences with the criminal justice system less intelligible. White criminal defendants, like George Zimmerman and Michael Dunn, have rights that are respected. Police officers, like Darren Wilson and Daniel Pantaleo, have protections and immunities. Men of color victims, like Trayvon Martin, Jordan Davis, Eric Garner, and Michael Brown, are legible as posthumously deserving (the pretense of) justice. But women like CeCe McDonald, Rekia Boyd, Jessie Hernandez, and Sarah Lee Circle Bear are never represented as entitled to any of these—rights, protections, or justice. For instance, McDonald is seen as a criminal (as in a person already condemned and convicted), but she was never treated as a criminal defendant (as in a person still legally innocent and technically rights-bearing). Her case is not an anomaly. Women, girls, and gender nonconforming people of color are excluded from participating in even the pretense of justice. As such, centering their cases exposes the ways in which the logic of “objective reasonableness,” which justifies police killings, is in itself highly gendered and therefore far from “objective” and “reasonable.”

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about Lisa Cacho HERE

February 1, 2019
  • Graduate student breakfast with Lisa Cacho

    February 1, 2019 @ 9:00 am - 10:30 am

    For more information or to RSVP, email mellonsawyer@psu.edu

February 11, 2019
  • "Terrorist, Gang Member, Provocateur: Visuality and (Dis)placement in the Bay Area” with Maryam Kashani

    February 11, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 112 Kern Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

    In 2013 the city of Oakland, California, began plans to start the second phase of a Homeland Security-sponsored Domain Awareness Center aimed at intensifying and aggregating surveillance around the city. This talk and film performance considers how Muslims in coalition with activists, lawyers, and organizers, mobilized against this program articulating the effects of surveillance, gentrification, and policing on their families, communities, and the possibilities of political dissent.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about Maryam Kashani HERE

February 12, 2019
  • Faculty/Grad workshop with Maryam Kashani: "Representation, Resistance, and Refusal"

    February 12, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

February 21, 2019
  • ‘Before the Human: Africans, Sovereigns & Slaves’ with Herman L. Bennett

    February 21, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 160 Willard Building, Penn State, University Park, PA 16802

    This talk by Dr. Bennett asks how might the focus on eighteenth-century race and commodification obscure earlier and equally expansive ideas about difference and dispossession?  In taking up this question as a conceptual starting point, the talk charts a different, if not lost, genealogies of difference and dispossession that defined how Europeans in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries registered their encounter with Africans and subsequently classified some as subjects of sovereigns and other as sovereign-less subjects who could be enslaved.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about Herman Bennet HERE

February 22, 2019
  • Faculty and Grad workshop with Herman Bennett

    February 22, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

    For more information or to RSVP, email mellonsawyer@psu.edu

March 21, 2019
  • "The Racial Logics of Extraction" with Christopher Loperena

    March 21, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 160 Willard Building, Penn State University, 16802

    Through an ethnographic engagement with the politics of frontier making in Honduras, I interrogate the racial logics of the extractivist development agenda that cohered in the wake of the 2009 coup. This developmental mandate is crucially bound up with dominant racio-spatial epistemologies, which render indigenous and black peoples as barriers to national progress. The suspension of democratic norms following the coup was used to usher in the sistema de la muerte (system of death) that has not only claimed the lives of dozens of land and environmental activists, but also resulted in the concession of over 30% of Honduran territory to foreign and national investors. I demonstrate the ways in which the expansion of extractive capitalism is contingent on a settler colonial logic of elimination, which positions blackness outside the spatial boundaries of the state’s sovereign political territory in order to hasten processes of accumulation for the national elite.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about Christopher Loperena HERE

March 22, 2019
  • Faculty and Grad workshop with Christopher Loperena

    March 22, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

    For more information or to RSVP, email mellonsawyer@psu.edu

April 3, 2019
  • "The Future of Black Studies (In Theory)" with Dr. Brittney Cooper

    April 3, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 10 Sparks Building, Penn State University, 16802

    More information to follow.

    Learn more about Brittney Cooper HERE

April 17, 2019
  • "The Denial of Anti-Blackness: Multiracial Redemption and Black Suffering" with João Costa Vargas

    April 17, 2019 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm 162 Willard Building, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802

    This talk by Dr. Vargas will invite the audience to consider the concept of anti-blackness and the challenges of Black autonomous analysis and political organizing. He will bring to light how progressive research and progressive multiracial efforts that address Black suffering are often unable to engage foundational, structural, multigenerational, and ubiquitous forms of anti-blackness. In multiracial progressive mobilizations of the Black diaspora, Brazil and the U.S more specifically, Black suffering is acknowledged while anti-blackness is negated.

    This event is free and open to the public.

    Learn more about João Costa Vargas HERE

April 18, 2019
  • Faculty workshop w/João Costa Vargas

    April 18, 2019 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

    For more information or to RSVP, please email mellonsawyer@psu.edu.