Can you be allergic to different temperatures?

Growing up in New York, I experience what I like to think are hot hot summers and long cold winters. One of my best friends claims she is “allergic to the cold”, I have always wondered if this is even possible, how cold you be allergic to the cold? In the cold without enough layering Victoria, my friend, would break out in hives and have to put on more jackets, layers hat etc. I decided to look into this to see if she was just claiming some sort of illness.

After research I found a disease called “cold urticaria”, this is a skin reaction to the cold, so maybe Victoria was right! Cold urticaria is described as, “Skin that has been in contact with cold develops reddish, itchy welts (hives),” according to The Mayo Clinic website. This disease is more frequently seen in younger people, teenagers, and this disease also goes away as one ages. Not only is this reaction common in cold weather but it is also extremely common to come across cold urticaria when swimming in cold pools or other bodies of water. According to The Mayo Clinic website, some symptoms include, temporary reddish, and itchy welts on the part of the skin that came in contact with the cold temperatures. Other symptoms include, worsening of the reaction as skin warms, swelling of hands when coming in contact with something cold, and finally the swelling of areas of the face much as the lips when contacting a cold food or drink.

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There are many types of cases with cold urticaria when the situation is very serious. In Victoria’s case she does not need to worry about this, she only experiences hives and other rashes on her body. It was very interesting to learn that this disease I thought was a myth is actually valid!

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/cold-urticaria/basics/symptoms/con-20034524

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2015/02/25/can-really-be-allergic-to-cold/

 

5 thoughts on “Can you be allergic to different temperatures?

  1. Jada Baity

    I can imagine that being allergic to the cold is a thing because there are so many different people allergic to so many different things. One of these things, for example, could be the sun. This article calls allergies to the sun polymorphic light eruption (sun poisoning). If someone could break out in hives when sunlight came in contact with someone’s skin, I can imagine that there is someone out there who breaks out in hives when exposed to extreme cold. There are prescriptions that can be administered to people with cold urticaria which include antihistamines, cyproheptadine, doxepin (Silenor), etc. I found this post to be very interesting. It’s amazing to know that there are physical reactions to something as small as the weather.

  2. zsw5031

    I always knew people could be allergic to different seasons or the changing of seasons. I personally have THE WORST allergies when spring time rolls around. All the pollen in the air destroys me. I am always sneezing and will have a horrible congested nose. But to think people could be allergic to different temperatures is mind-boggling. I have never heard of “cold urticaria” but I could probably say the same about many other diseases since there seems to be a new one everyday. The fact that your friend actually develops hives and rashes is horrifying. I don’t know how I would make it through every winter each year if I had this disease. I tried researching whether you can be allergic to hot temperatures but I couldn’t seem to find anything. The only sites that came up were ones involving the cold and cold urticaria. I wonder why that is.

  3. zsw5031

    I always knew people could be allergic to different seasons or the changing of seasons. I personally have THE WORST allergies when spring time rolls around. All the pollen in the air destroys me. I am always sneezing and will have a horrible congested nose. But to think people could be allergic to different temperatures is mind-boggling. I have never heard of “cold urticaria” but I could probably say the same about many other diseases since there seems to be a new one everyday. The fact that your friend actually develops hives and rashes is horrifying. I don’t know how I would make it through every winter each year if I had this disease. I tried researching whether you can be allergic to hot temperatures but I couldn’t seem to find anything. The only sites that came up were ones involving the cold and cold urticaria. I wonder why that is.

  4. Giana Shan Yu Han

    While I have never liked the cold, I had no idea someone could be allergic to it. I heard someone claiming to be, but I was a bit skeptical. Not only was this post interesting, but it also made me a better informed person, so I will be less inclined to look at someone’s claims to be allergic to the cold with disbelief. I am curious, though, as to why the condition lessens with age. Does this go for other allergies as well? And is cold urticaria an actual allergy or a condition with reactions similar to those of an allergy? I also thought that the point the other comment made, that cold seasons can have negative effects on other allergies was a very interesting point, as well. This was a very creative post, and it certainly peaked my curiosity.

  5. amp6199

    I never knew that being cold could have a dermatological effect that went passed dry and itchy skin. However, now I know that people can actually, in a sense, be “allergic” to the cold! Did you know that being allergic to the cold can actually increase certain preexisting allergies? Winter is actually the worst season for people with indoor allergies (things like mold, dust, and pet dander) because people are gaining more exposure to them since they are inside. This was a great article!

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