Black-eyed Children

Before you guess, no, these are not the love children of the popular 2000s group the Black Eyed Peas.

The black-eyed children are paranormal creatures that resemble children around the ages 6 to 16 who have pale skin and pitch black eyes and completely soulless. (So maybe the love children of the Black Eyed Peas?)

Let’s do some history shall we? Some people claim that these children have existed since the 1980s, however, most sources say that the legend actually originated in 1996 in posts written by a Texas reporter named Brian Bethel where he wrote about two alleged encounters with the black-eyed children. He said that he encountered two children in Abilene, Texas with pale skin and black eyes and that someone had a similar experience in Portland, Oregon. In 2012, Bethel retold his story on the TV show Monsters and Mysteries in America, he then wrote an article for the Abilene Reporter News where he described his experience again.

Also in 2012, a horror film titled Black Eyed Kids was produced and in 2013 an episode of MSN’s Weekly Strange featured different reports of the black-eyed children. Both of these things were thought to have helped spread this urban legend along.

This legend even crossed bodies of water and landed in the great land of the UK where in 2014 the Daily Star wrote three front-page stories about sightings of the black-eyed children in the haunted pub in Staffordshire. These alleged sightings were taken very seriously by ghost hunters who believed that the black-eyed children were extraterrestrials, vampires, or ghosts.

Now days, people still claim to see the black-eyed children when driving late at night down an empty road, or outside of their window late at night, or even lurking in the shadows of their room. In fact, many people have reported seeing the black-eyed children standing in the corner of their room during their episodes of sleep paralysis or even waking up in the middle of night because they sensed someone was watching them and in the shadows were these children.

Now, I’ll leave you with a lingering question…

Where are their parents?

**I feel like you can really see my sleep deprivation in this one**

3 thoughts on “Black-eyed Children”

  1. Hi Larsen!
    Your story is quite interesting. I am thinking that maybe from a distance, kids look like they have black eyes sometimes? I feel like children are not inherently evil but the epitome of innocence, so movies like “Children of the Corn” are wholly improbable…perhaps, people get creative about scary mysteries because it gains them tourists. For example, I know there is a city in Pennsylvania (I think) that is home of the “Moth Man” which is basically just a flying man that has the wings of a moth. The city has stores and statues dedicated to this phenomenon, and they host an annual moth man festival every year. So, for this town the urban legend has actually gained them revenue! I think that’s funny. Maybe the same thing is going on with these black-eyed children. Thanks for a good read! 🙂

  2. Is Fergie the mother and of all demon children? Hm…a thought(tm) that I think scientists, theorists, and maybe even the great Bill Nye himself should be looking into…you never know… 🤔🤔🤔

    In all seriousness, this was really fascinating to read. I love this stuff. I don’t know what it is about children that makes them so creepy in this context…maybe it’s the usual innocent nature of children? In this legend and in other horror-y, thriller-like things (like The Shining and a whole bunch of other things with creepy kids I’m definitely forgetting about), kids are used to develop a really unsettling atmosphere and I think this really came through in the tales of the black-eyed children. Gonna go analyze all of the Black Eyed Peas songs for clues in the lyrics…

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