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Crowd Funding Success!

We are very grateful for the donations given to support the advertising and marketing of the Walk in Penn’s Woods. We raised $4,900! Thank you to all who supported this statewide effort to build appreciation for forests, the people who own them, and the importance of tending them.

Our tours and walks are lining up. As of today, August 1, we have almost 30 walks scheduled across the state. There will be open houses and guided walks in rural, urban, and suburban woods, state and national forests and parks, municipal watersheds, conserved areas, private lands and industry forests showcasing the multiple values and diverse uses of Pennsylvania’s priceless forest resources. Information about each walk can be found on the Where are the October 7 Walks Happening? section of this website.

We hope Pennsylvanian’s will continue to show their support by joining us on October 7: participate in a walk, share information about Penn’s Woods with others, or even host their own learning adventure in Pennsylvania’s woodlands. Mark your calendar to attend an event in your area.

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Urban Refuge

The urban forests in our municipalities are highly diverse, ranging from healthy natural areas and traditional parks, to open space and greenways, woodlots, and trees and plants found in streetscapes and other residential and business landscapes. Trees and parks provide multiple environmental, human health, economic, educational, family, and social benefits that support healthy and prosperous communities in many ways.

Urban trees: • Increase the property values 5 to 20%. • Increase the amount of time people spend shopping and the amount they are willing to spend for parking and retail goods. • Increase desire to lease commercial real estate, even more than a building’s proximity to main roads. • Reduce health, energy, stormwater, and other costs to people and society.

A single large shade tree: • Saves $29 in summertime air conditioning by shading a building and cooling the air. • Absorbs 10 pounds of air pollution, including ozone and particulates plus 90 pounds of carbon dioxide through direct sequestration in wood and reduced power plant emissions. • Intercepts and evaporates 760 gallons of rainfall in its own crown, thereby reducing runoff of stormwater and flooding.

Photo by Julianne Schieffer

Two more days left in our Match Week where your gift doubles. And, less than a week left to GIVE! Donate today Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018 Campaign.

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Vital Water Resources!

There is a direct connection between the forest and your faucet. Forests are the most effective land cover for maintaining good water quality. They serve as natural sponges, collecting and filtering rainfall and releasing it slowly into streams. One hundred mature trees catch about 139,000 gallons of rainwater each year – enough to fill 10 average-sized in-ground swimming pools! Forest cover has been directly linked to drinking water treatment costs – the more forest in a source water watershed, the lower the treatment costs. And, when you’re out in the woods, there’s nothing quite as refreshing as a nice cold drink of water from a mountain spring! Whether you’re fishing, hiking to a waterfalls, skipping rocks in a stream, or simply getting a drink from your own faucet, remember the role forests play in providing clean, fresh water!

Photo By Laura Kirt

Your gift to Walk in Penn’s Woods helps us connect the forest and the faucet.

In the last 20 days we have raised $1,810.00. Donate today Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018.

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Wildlife Everywhere!

Everyone oohs and aahs when they see a just-born fawn, a beautiful bird, or mama bear and her cubs. These may bring the “wow” factor to a day in Penn’s Woods, but there is so much more to discover. Penn’s Woods is host to more than 3,000 species of plants, 400 species of birds, 200 species of fish, 75 species of reptiles and amphibians, and 70 species of mammals. All told, there are more than 25,000 species documented in the state – more than half are fungi and invertebrates (insects, crustaceans, worms, etc.). Hundreds of thousands of people come to Pennsylvania to enjoy this natural heritage, adding to the estimated $1.93 billion in economic activity connected with hiking, camping, bird-watching, and similar activities.

Photo by Laura Kirt

Please support Walk in Penn’s Woods to help us tell the story of all its creatures!

Donate today Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018 Campaign.

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The Penn’s Woods Story!

Here’s a little Penn’s Woods forest history: Back in 1630, before the early settlers, Pennsylvania’s forest cover stood at 90%, over 40,000 square miles of untouched forests! Is it any wonder why our state’s name – Pennsylvania – means Penn’s Woods? William Penn’s 1681 Charter of Rights called for colonists to leave 1 acre of forest for every 5 acres cleared. The 1800’s saw the state at the center of the industrial revolution, driven by the expansion of mining, railroads, petroleum, iron and steel (and hence charcoal) production, and manufacturing. By the beginning of the 1900’s Pennsylvania’s forest cover had dwindled to 32%. Conservationists like Joseph Rothrock and Gifford Pinchot had decades earlier realized gravity of the loss of one of the nation’s greatest natural resources, and conservation efforts got underway in earnest in the early 1900’s. Forest recovery was a slow process, with trees planted by hand in the barren lands that were once beautiful forests. Restoration efforts gained momentum and funding during the 1900’s, and today, close to 60% of the state is once again covered in trees. What’s happening now? Pennsylvania’s forests are shrinking, a trend predicted to continue into the future. A 2012 study shows that by 2030, an estimated 6% or 761,000 acres of all privately-owned forests in the state will succumb to residential development. That’s 1,200 square miles, over 8 cities the size of Philadelphia!

Photo from Penn State Archives

Your gift to Walk in Penn’s Woods will help us share the history of our working forests and ensure an informed, bright future!

Donate today Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018 Campaign.

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For the Love of Trees!

Have you hugged a tree in Penn’s Woods lately? Pennsylvania’s most common forest types are mixed oaks and Northern hardwoods. In fact, Pennsylvania is one of the top producers worldwide of hardwood lumber, with revenues from the state’s wood products industry reaching $11.5 billion a year. The top 10 tree species found in our 16.58 million acres of forest are: 1. Red maple, 2. Black birch, 3. Black cherry, 4. Beech, 5. Sugar maple, 6. Hemlock, 7. White ash, 8. Red oak, 9. Chestnut oak, and 10. Black gum. But some of our favorite species are under attack. Non-native insects and tree diseases increasingly impact Pennsylvania’s forests. Gypsy moth, emerald ash borer, hemlock woolly adelgid, chestnut blight, Dutch elm disease, sudden oak death…the list keeps growing. The latest culprit is the spotted lanternfly, which is causing quite a stir throughout the state, especially in the southeastern counties.

Photo by Laura Kirt Studios

Help us raise awareness about the importance of Penn’s Woods and how we can better care for this vital resource. Make your contribution and help share the word: (Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018). And go out and hug a tree today!

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It’s All about Solitude!

Do you know the number 1 reason why Pennsylvanians own forests? It’s solitude — that quiet, alone time that empowers us after a crazy, hectic day! A few well-spent hours in a forest can recharge, revitalize, and restore us. As naturalist John Muir puts it, “In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.” It’s no wonder that nearly 12 million acres of Pennsylvania’s woodlands are owned by private forest landowners! About three-quarters of a million people own a part of Penn’s Woods. But, with a total population of 12.5 million people, we need your help in introducing every Pennsylvania citizen to the wonders of our forests through the statewide Walk in Penn’s Woods on Sunday, October 7.

Photo by Laura Kirt

Please support Walk in Penn’s Woods and help us tell the story of all its amazing benefits! And be sure to take time this week to rejuvenate and enjoy Penn’s Woods!

Since Monday, we have received $1,700 towards our goal of $5,000. Donate today Walk in Penn’s Woods 2018 Campaign.

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Here’s what people are saying…

“It was a beautiful afternoon for a ‘Walk in Penn’s Woods.’ It was an enjoyable and refreshing outing for everyone in our group!”

Photo Credit: Laura Sellers

“Having a variety of stations on many different forest topics was appreciated by the audience. Everyone found something that was of interest to them. We will definitely go this way next year!”

Photo Credit: Laura Sellers

 

“…a perfect day in the woods learning about tree species., how to use a field guide, and the diverse benefits and uses of trees. The comradery among individuals (many meeting for the first time) was amazing.”

Photo Credit: Laura Sellers