Category Archives: School Libraries

2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium

Deadline Extended to 12/15: Call for Papers for Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium 2018

The planning committee for the 2018 Gender and Sexuality in Information Studies Colloquium invites you to continue these conversations July 20-21, 2018 in Boston, Massachusetts at Simmons College. For more information, see the conference website and #gsisc18 on Twitter.

We invite submissions from individuals as well as pre-constituted panels. Submit your proposals here by December 15: https://bit.ly/GSISC18

WORK: GSISC 18

 

How do gender and sexuality WORK in library and information studies?

Gender and sexuality play various roles in the production, organization, dissemination, and consumption of information of all kinds. As categories of social identity, they do not act alone but in interaction and intersection with race, class, nation, language, ability and disability, and other social structures and systems. These intersections have been explored by information studies scholars, librarians, archivists, and other information sector workers in various contexts, including at two previous colloquia in Toronto (2014) and Vancouver (2016).

We invite submissions that address gender and sexuality and WORK: working it and doing the work, organized labor and emotional labor. The colloquium takes place in a moment of intensification both of various systems of oppression and resistance movements to them. As conservative national, state, and local politics and policies threaten healthcare and abortion rights, intensify the militarization of national borders, and attack organized labor from multiple directions, we are heartened by surges of organizing, activism, and direct action against them. In the information sector we see renewed focus on issues related to diversity and inclusion, open access and open collections, and critical approaches to everything from teaching to data management. Feminist and queer theory and practice are central to the work of making new and just worlds.

We are especially interested in submissions that link gender and sexuality to other, intersecting forms of difference. Potential topics might include:

  • Gender, race, and class dimensions of “professionalism”

  • Sex and sexuality in materials selection, organization, preservation, and access

  • Intersections of social, political, and cultural organization with information organization

  • Information practices of diversity, equity, and inclusion

  • The work of the “normal” in information studies and practice

  • Labor organizing in information workplaces

  • The ways that gendered or feminized labor is and is not documented in the historical record

  • “Resistance” as a mode of information work

  • Ability and disability as structuring forces in libraries and archives

  • How information workers inhabit, deploy, restrict, and manifest as bodies at work

  • Eroding distinctions between work and leisure

  • Distinctions between embodied, emotional, intellectual information work

  • Contingent and precarious labor in the information workplace

  • Ethics of care and empathy in information work

  • Masculinity and power in libraries and archives

  • Desire in the library and archive

Deadline for submission: December 15, 2017

Notification by February 1, 2018

Registration opens February 15, 2018

Please direct any questions or concerns to Emily Drabinski at emily.drabinski@gmail.com

3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018: Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community

Call for Proposals

Deadline November 15, 2017

Submit proposals here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

The 3rd National Joint Conference of Librarians of Color in 2018, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community” will take place September 26-30, 2018 in Albuquerque, NM. The conference is promoted by the Joint Council for Librarians of Color whose purpose is “To promote librarianship within communities of color, support literacy and the preservation of history and cultural heritage, collaborate on common issues, and to host the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color every four to five years.”

The Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC) is a conference open to all library staff, students, influencers, and decision makers interested in exploring inclusive policies and practices in libraries and how they affect the ethnic communities who use our services. JCLC strives to deepen connections across constituencies, create spaces for dialogue, promote the telling and celebrating of one’s stories, and encourage the transformation of libraries into more democratic and diverse organizations. This conference is sponsored by the five ethnic affiliates of the American Library Association: the American Indian Library Association (AILA), Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association (APALA), Black Caucus of the American Library Association (BCALA), Chinese American Librarians Association (CALA), and the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish Speaking (REFORMA). JCLC 2018 follows the first gathering in 2006 in Dallas, TX and the second in 2012 in Kansas City, MO.

The 2018 JCLC Steering Committee invites you to submit a proposal for presentation at the conference focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community”. Proposal submission deadlines are listed below.

What’s on the page:

JCLC Tracks and Topics

JCLC 2018 seeks conference session presentations in all areas of diversity, including, but not limited to, the topics below, focusing on the theme “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.” Ideal sessions will provide:

  • Insights, skills, tools, and strategies that stress solutions, implementation, and practical applications
  • Highlight exemplary programs, approaches, and models
  • Facilitate constructive dialogue, interaction, and understanding around significant issues affecting conference constituencies
  • Discuss efforts to create more inclusive environments, curricula, and programs.

The Program Committee will strive to select a balance of academic, school, tribal, special, and public libraries learning opportunities.

  • Advocacy, Outreach and Collaboration
    Marketing; outreach to diverse populations; community collaborations; user spaces; public policy; health education; using census data and other government information; cultural programming; services to and rebuilding of communities hit with disaster; research; undocumented, urban, rural and low-income communities; etc.
  • Collections, Programs and Services
    Ethnic and multicultural collections; film and music; information literacy; children’s, youth and adult programming; programs for diverse populations; reference; instruction; grant funded programs; technical services; archives; preservation; digital inclusion; documenting traditional knowledge; research; cataloging/subject headings/controlled vocabulary; etc.
  • Bridge Building, Intersectionality and Inclusion
    Fostering awareness, acceptance, and inclusion of all communities; disabilities; gender; celebrating elders; religion; sexual orientation/LGBTQIA populations; nationality; sharing traditional knowledge; serving the incarcerated; immigrant and refugees; cross cultural issues; transnational communities; multiculturalism; best practices and model programs promoting bridge building, intersectionality, and inclusion; microaggressions; cultural humility; etc.
  • Leadership, Management and Organizational Development
    Administration; staff development/training; recruitment and retention; leadership; organizational culture; management; cultural competencies; mentoring; assessment; mid-career strategies; staff and paraprofessional issues; conflict resolution and mediation; reorganization and restructuring; leading during tight economic times; institutional change; research; fundraising; institutional racism; breaking the glass ceiling; etc.
  • Technology and Innovation
    Teaching and learning; emerging technologies; e-repositories; social networking applications; digitization; equal access for users; library tools; e-books; mobile devices; widgets; mashups; online learning and collaboration; open access movements; social aspects of technology and implications for use; videos; etc.

Session Formats

All sessions are 75 minutes long with the exception of preconferences (Preconference programs may be either 4 or 8 hours) and may take one of the following formats:

  • Panel Presentation
  • Individual Paper/Presentation
  • Roundtable
  • Workshop
  • Poster Session
  • Film with discussion
  • Preconferences

JCLC will also accept proposals in different formats (other than those listed above) that will excite, engage, and create a new learning environment for conference attendees. Proposals may be accepted on the condition of combining proposed sessions into a single session with other proposals or as a different format than originally accepted.

Prohibited Submissions

Program proposals promoting or selling products/services during conference sessions will not be accepted.

Deadline

All proposals must be received by midnight PST on November 15, 2017. No late submissions will be accepted. Notifications of proposal selection will be made on a rolling basis beginning on January 15, 2018 and ending on February 15, 2018.

Selection Criteria

All proposals will be reviewed by the JCLC Program Committee. Proposals are evaluated on quality and clarity of content, uniqueness of topic, relevance to conference attendees, ability to engage the audience, and the relationship of the proposal to the mission and theme of the conference, “Gathering all Peoples: Embracing Culture & Community.”
All presenters of selected programs must register for the conference. Only registered participants will be allowed to present.

Proceedings

JCLC will encourage the selected conference presenters, in all formats, to publish their content using the online conference program application. The content will be directly linked to the program abstract and remain posted for one year. It is recommended that all program content be uploaded by the day of the presentation. Authors will retain copyright to their original work and are encouraged to publish their content in other established venues.

Submission site

Please submit your proposal here: JCLC 2018 Conference Proposal Submission Site

Questions

Many questions can be answered on the FAQ. Questions not answered in the FAQs may be sent to the JCLC Programs Committee at jclc2018programs@gmail.com.


The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Call for Chapters:

Working Title: The Complete Guide to Open Scholarship

Editors: Darren Chase & Dana Haugh

Submission Deadline: December 1st

Publisher: ALA Editions


Book Description

This peer-reviewed collection will bring together a dynamic set of librarians, scholars, practitioners, policy makers and thinkers in order to take measure of the open access movement. Critical essays, research, case studies and other pieces will create a substantial, far-reaching text.  This collection will be critical and practical, and provide practical examples and theory in understanding the open access movement, open data, open educational resources, open knowledge, and the opportunity for an open and transformed world.


More and more universities–often spearheaded by university libraries–are adopting open access policies as a practical way to promote open access and further the research enterprise, while countering the often closed, restrictive and costly scholarly journals and databases.  This book will provide a substantial and practical overview of the open access movement, along with critical essays and consideration of the meaning of open access and its potential to leverage existing technology to transform how we support, share and access research.


We are looking for case studies, research, and critical essays on various aspects of open access scholarship, including:


  • Library Open Access Initiatives (implementations, challenges, processes, training, promotion/outreach, etc.)

  • Open Access Publishers & Journals (reception, evaluation measures, predatory publishers)

  • Repositories (green open access, university-specific, network of open repositories, discipline-specific platforms)

  • Open Educational Resources (current landscape, value/usage, challenges)

  • Open Data (data repositories, linked data, metadata, research data management)

  • Publishing Models (gold open access, new models, university presses, peer-review etc)

  • Research consortia, governmental & NGO initiatives

  • Public access to publically-funded research

  • University policies on open access (issues of mandatory vs. voluntary, on-boarding faculty/staff, creating buy-in, etc.)

  • Future of open access

  • Other areas of open scholarship


Timeline

Abstract submission deadline: December 1, 2017

Notification of acceptance/rejection: January 15, 2017


Submissions

Please use this form to submit abstracts of 200-500 words.
Abstracts should briefly describe your topic and how your chapter relates to open scholarship. Multiple submissions are welcome. If your submission is tentatively accepted, the editors may request modifications. Material cannot be previously published.

Final chapters will be in the 3,000-5,000 word range (some exceptions will be made for longer chapters). Chapters will be peer-reviewed.

Please direct any questions to Darren Chase (darren.chase@stonybrook.edu) or Dana Haugh (dana.haugh@stonybrook.edu)


About the editors

Darren Chase is Head of the Center for Scholarly Communication, Stony Brook University.  His research interests include open access, crowdfunded research, online learning, digital badging and information literacy. Darren has written and presented widely on myriad scholarly publishing topics.  He spearheaded the development and eventual adoption of the Stony Brook University Open Access Policy, and coordinates the annual Stony Brook University Open Access Symposium.


Dana Haugh is Web Services Librarian at Stony Brook University Libraries where she leads the design and development of the library’s web presences. Her research interests include web design, open access, marketing & outreach in libraries, and information literacy. Dana has extensive experience writing for top journals and monographs in the library field. She’s particularly focused on ensuring scholarship is openly accessible and helps manage her university’s institutional repository which promotes open access to scholarship published by Stony Brook University faculty.

Urban Library Journal (ULJ)

Call for Papers
Urban Library Journal (ULJ) is an open access, double-blind peer-reviewed journal of research that addresses all aspects of urban libraries and urban librarianship.
 
Urban Library Journal invites submissions in broad areas such as public higher education, urban studies, multiculturalism, library and educational services to immigrants, preservation of public higher education, and universal access to World Wide Web resources. We welcome articles that focus on all forms of librarianship in an urban setting, whether that setting is an academic, research, public, school, or special library.
 
Possible topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Reference and instruction in diverse, multicultural urban settings
  • Radical librarianship, social justice issues, and/or informed agitation
  • Intentional design / “library as space” in an urban setting
  • Physical and/or virtual accessibility issues
  • Open access / open education resources in urban systems
  • Innovative collaboration between academic departments, other branches, or community partnerships
  • More!
 
Completed manuscript length should fall between 2,500 and 5,000 words. Full author guidelines can be found on the ULJ website: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj/author_guidelines.html
 
The submission period is open! We publish articles on a rolling basis and close issues twice per year (Oct / May). For more information about ULJ and to see the latest issue: http://academicworks.cuny.edu/ulj.
 
If you have questions about whether your paper topic is within the journal’s scope, please email the editors Anne.Hays@csi.cuny.edu,  Angel.Falcon@bcc.cuny.edu, and/or Cheryl Branch cb1704@hunter.cuny.edu

 

18th Distance Library Services Conference

Proposals for panel sessions, poster sessions, and workshops are being accepted for the 18th Distance Library Services Conference. The conference will be held April 11-13, 2018, in San Antonio, TX.

Panel Sessions:

Panel sessions are an opportunity for three or four presenters from different institutions to interactively address an issue of importance to distance librarianship and should focus on helping attendees understand multiple perspectives on a topic. Active participation is an important element of these sessions, so panelists are encouraged to engage in debate, pose questions to the audience or each other, and help the audience engage actively.

Poster Sessions:

Poster sessions provide an informal forum to report on innovative projects, introduce new services and resources, or test research ideas of interest to distance librarianship. Posters should be a creative visual representation of a topic, including graphs, tables, charts, and images. A contest will be held to encourage creativity in poster design and content. Attendees will vote on their favorite posters and the winning poster will be awarded a $50 Amazon gift certificate.

Workshops:

Workshops are two (2) hour sessions that provide active learning opportunities for attendees. Participants will engage an issue, learn a new skill, or develop an action plan or other activity where hands-on learning is integral. Workshops should allow participants to be involved in and contribute to the learning process and the learning experience should excite and encourage the participants to be fully engaged. Participants should leave the workshop with ideas, information, techniques, or skills to share with their colleagues. Workshops will be held on the first day of the conference, April 11, 2018..

Proposals will be accepted through Oct. 1, 2017. To submit a proposal, please visit http://libguides.cmich.edu/dls2018/call_for_proposals.

Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thad Dickinson

Coordinator, Distance Library Services Conference

Central Michigan University

thad.dickinson@cmich.edu

CCLI 2018 – Library Instruction by Design: Using Design Thinking to Meet Evolving Needs

The California Conference on Library Instruction seeks to showcase the ways in which librarians have approached library instruction and information literacy problems through the lens of Design Thinking.

Design Thinking involves using a designer’s perspective to improve services through creative problem solving. A fundamental aspect of this process is that it is iterative, in that intermediate “solutions” are potential starting points that allow for experimentation and flexibility in piloting or revitalizing programs. Design Thinking allows for redefinition of the initial problem by stakeholders throughout all points of the design process. “The challenges facing librarians are real, complex and varied. And given the rapidly evolving information landscape, they need new answers, which requires new perspectives, new tools, and new approaches. Design thinking is one of these new approaches” (1).

We invite you to submit a proposal in the form of a breakout session (60 minute presentations or 75 minute workshops) or a lightning talk (5 – 7 minutes). We recommend that prospective presenters review our evaluation rubric for presentations and workshops at: cclibinstruction.org/ccli-rubric-2018/. Proposals should relate to the conference theme, clearly outline the session, and be timely and applicable to librarians. For presentations and workshops, please include 2 – 3 learning outcomes as well as how you plan to incorporate active learning into your session.

Proposals might entail descriptions of a way in which you have gathered inspiration and generated ideas, made those ideas tangible, and / or how you have communicated what worked and what did not. Specific questions that could be addressed are:

What methods did you use to place library users at the center of your thinking?
What data did you gather before undertaking a large change?
What kinds of iterations did a large project undergo and how did you keep things on track?
What did you learn from unfinished, or even failed, approaches?

Please use our submission form at bit.ly/CCLI2018. The deadline for submissions is Monday, October 23. CCLI 2018 will be held at the University of San Francisco on Friday, June 1st, 2018.

We appreciate your consideration and look forward to hearing from you! For questions, contact Irene Korber (ikorber@csuchico.edu) or Ryne Leuzinger (rleuzinger@csumb.edu).

(1) IDEO. (2014). Design Thinking for Libraries. http://designthinkingforlibraries.com/

 

ISTE 2018

 Chicago IL

June 24-27, 2018

For more information go to: https://conference.iste.org/2018/presenters/submit_proposal.php

ISTE 2018 is the place where educator-tested strategies come together with proven resources for transforming learning and teaching. It’s also the place to get connected to the brightest minds in edtech, then network with them all year long.

We seek proposals from educators at any career stage, from all backgrounds and all parts of the world, and we love to see student participation in presentations! We also welcome exhibitor proposals that demonstrate noncommercial uses of technology to transform education.

Proposals must be submitted online by 11:59 p.m. PT, September 29, 2017.

What makes a good proposal?

We’re looking for presentations that:

  • Take advantage of student-centered pedagogy; show how educators can individualize learning by differentiating instruction and introducing real-world problem-solving; and support your ideas with the latest scientific research on how students learn.
  • Enhance educators’ knowledge. Our goal is to increase both the technical knowledge and the pedagogical content knowledge of educators and teacher candidates.
  • Help develop leadership skills. Explore ways to encourage and empower educators and students to lead.
  • Advance digital age learning. Delve into systems, models, practices and strategies for creating meaningful digital age learning experiences, both virtual and face to face.
  • Address the ISTE Standards. How does your proposal support the ISTE Standards? Provide a model for achieving standards-aligned objectives.
  • Encourage audience participation. Think beyond the lecture and devise new ways to engage your audience. Our session formats include interactive lectures, BYODs, snapshots, roundtables, open-area poster sessions and more. Demonstrate the use of technology to model instructional best practices.
  • Add to the conversation around current relevant challenges, including computer science and integration of computer science into curriculum, higher ed topics and virtual reality.

 

Journal of Formative Design in Learning

An official journal of the Association for Educational Communications & Technology

Presents original papers that inform the study and practice of education and training

Bridges theory and practice, discussing new developments and their impact on the practice of education and training

Fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process

Journal of Formative Design in Learning bridges the gap between theory and practice by providing reflective practitioners (designers, teachers, instructors, researchers, and others) in teaching and learning with a single source of scholarly papers that discuss new developments and the impact of this new knowledge on the field. The journal publishes original papers on research-based design and development with a focus on applied research, including evaluation reports, action research, case studies, and lessons learned that inform improvement in instruction, and design and development approaches. While the main audience is practitioners, all articles are grounded in established research and theory. The journal encourages and nurtures the development of reflective practitioners of the learning sciences and serves to update and redefine the concept of learning. The journal fosters collaborations between researchers and practitioners of the learning process, and articles inform the study and practice of education and training. The journal provides opportunities not only to established academics and practitioners, but also to junior faculty and emerging scholars. A formative peer-review process is specifically designed to help less experienced authors understand the submission, review, and publication processes of this peer-reviewed academic journal.

For more information about submissions go to http://www.editorialmanager.com/JFDL/default.aspx

International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Mission of IJBIDE:

The International Journal of Bias, Identity and Diversities in Education (IJBIDE) investigates critically the positioning of diverse individuals in formal and informal contexts of education – from kindergarten to adult education, but also lifelong learning. Diversities here refer to different identity markers such as ethnicity, religion, gender, social class, citizenship, disabilities, educational background and language(s). IJBIDE is clearly positioned within a non-essentialist and non-culturalist perspective. IJBIDE also aims to promote original research methods by linking up macro- and micro- methodological approaches. The journal is fully blind peer reviewed by the best experts in the field and publishes empirical and conceptual research and case studies from around the world.

Indices of IJBIDE:

  • Cabell’s Directories
  • Google Scholar
  • Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory

Coverage of IJBIDE:

The topics covered in the contributions include (but are not limited to):

  • The perception, place and role of diversities in (teacher) education (students, teachers, student-teachers, leadership, etc.)
  • Bullying, bias, segregation and discrimination in education
  • Academic and student mobility and diversities
  • Diversities and informal learning
  • School choices and diversities
  • Teaching about diversities (intercultural/global competence)
  • Forms of discrimination and segregation in education
  • Place/space and diversities
  • Diversities and digital educational technologies
  • Links between ‘home’ and school in relation to diversities (parents)
  • Media representations of diversities in education
  • Assessment, evaluation and diversities
  • Role and place of diversities in education policies
  • Diversities within a school system
  • Teaching material and diversities
  • History of diversities in education
  • Interactions between and integration of students of diverse backgrounds
  • Role and place of teachers of diverse backgrounds
  • Perception and integration of the ‘foreigner’ in education
  • Diversities and multilingual education
  • Methods or methodologies/conceptual approaches and researching diversities
  • Reflexivity and/or critical awareness around diversities in education
  • Social Action and Diversities
  • The commodification or processes of commodifying of diversities in education
  • Inclusive education and diversities
  • The impact of globalization on diversities
  • Social processes and diversification/differentiation
  • Multimodality and diversities

Interested authors should consult the journal’s manuscript submission guidelines www.igi-global.com/calls-for-papers/international-journal-bias-identity-diversities/125026

PaLA Conference Poster Sessions

October 15 – 18, 2017
DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh – GreenTree
We hope you will plan to attend the Pennsylvania Library Association Annual Conference to take place at the DoubleTree by Hilton, Pittsburgh–Greentree, located in a Pittsburgh suburb with close proximity to city attractions.  The PaLA Conference offers numerous ways to further your career with innovative educational programming and opportunities to network with your peers in the library community. 

Poster sessions provide an informal forum for library professionals from across the state to share their successful program ideas or innovations with colleagues. An effective poster presentation highlights, with visual display, the main points or components of your topic; the presenter fills in the details verbally and answers questions from those viewing the poster. The object is to gather feedback and to make connections with others interested in the same subject. If you have an idea for a program or study that you’d like to share, we invite you to present a poster!

The deadline for submission of poster proposals is Wednesday, May 31, 2017.

For more information about the conference, and to access the link to the session proposal form, visit the 2017 Conference Information Page.

Thank you in advance to all that submit proposals, we appreciate your dedication to PaLA and to Pennsylvania’s libraries!